Category: Customer Stories


How to Recruit Passive Candidates, Part 2

July 20th, 2016

As discussed, the goal of of sourcing passive candidates is to build relationships with highly skilled pools of talent. You usually won’t find passive candidate resumes online, and engagement requires a strategic and thoughtful approach. So, what can you do?

passive candidate pool First, it’s important to build your pool, and in turn, your network. A great way to be successful is name generation. While resumes are nearly impossible to find, names are not. You know your target candidate, and you know the companies where they work. In it’s simplest form, creating an excel spreadsheet with columns of name, title, company, location, and contact info is a great start.

Use all the channels possible to build your pool; LinkedIn, associations, conferences, company websites, and universities, just to name a few. Put every name you find that is attached to the target industry and expertise for which you’re looking on the list. It can’t hurt to have more than you need when building a pool for passive sourcing.

With your list or ‘talent pool’ complete, you can begin to engage. You can start with your primary targets, or folks you know wouldn’t be an exact fit, but could be a great referral source. Modify your email or message for each set of candidates, requesting their expertise to identify the extremely niche skill set you seek.

More often than not, people are willing to help, point you in a good direction, or even have a colleague who would be interested that you missed. It’s important to be thorough and resilient when sourcing passive candidates, traits that will set you apart from every other sourcer or recruiter in the war for talent.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

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What is sourcing in recruitment process?

July 6th, 2016

Sourcing Recruitment ProcessSourcing is a common term, often used in the procurement of services and vendors. But sourcing is also commonly used in regards to talent acquisition. So what is sourcing in the recruitment process? Since not all jobs can be filled by posting a job online and having applicants find you, you (or someone on behalf of your company) have to go find good candidates to fill your position. That is sourcing.

Sourcing is a talent acquisition discipline which is focused on the identification, assessment and engagement of skilled worker candidates through proactive recruiting techniques (Wiki).

But wait, isn’t that recruiting? While sourcing is a discipline within the recruiting process, there is a distinction between sourcing and recruiting. Check out our article How is Talent Sourcing Different from Recruiting? There is also some heated debate over the definition of Sourcing vs. Recruiting, and whether recruiters are sourcers are recruiters.

What do you think?

How to Recruit Passive Candidates

June 22nd, 2016

magnet attracting passive candidatesSometimes recruiting can be pretty straight forward. You have an open job, you post it online, and a significant pool of talented individuals apply for the job, eagerly expressing their interest. You interview, negotiate offers and fill the position. But often, when the job opening requires unique talent, passive talent will be the target. Active candidates don’t fulfill the requirements and you need to reach the candidates that aren’t searching for jobs, haven’t expressed any interest in your requisition, and are generally happy with their current role.

Recruiting these passive candidates requires a strategic approach to generate interest. Passive candidates usually don’t have a resume online, and certainly aren’t regularly applying to jobs. Identifying and recruiting passive candidates should be focused on marketing the opportunity to each individual. Think about why his or her background translates well into the role, and tailor your message appropriately.

The goal is to engage and build relationships with pools of highly skilled candidates. It’s important to position yourself as an expert in the industry market and develop your network. Again, marketing or selling the job and company is crucial. Put yourself in their shoes. What’s it like to receive an unexpected message, call, or an invitation to connect on social media? Are you making that unexpected conversation worth their while? Remember, in the passive candidate market, the recruiter needs the candidate, not the other way around.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

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Please Stop Writing about Millennials in the Workplace

June 15th, 2016

Millennials chatterIn five years, a majority of workers will be Millennials. Boomers are retiring or being replaced at a rapid pace of 10-13,000 per day! Everyone talks about how Millennials are going to change work for the rest of us. They have. But the change started long before they came on the scene in large numbers. The only point that matters is that many of us want to work differently. And have been working on it since Millennials were born.

Smart businesses have realized that most of us don’t work for a paycheck. We work for a purpose. Which is why so many of us care about working some place that has a mission!

They say Millennials only care about their growth and new skills. Haven’t we all grown tired of video games and smoothies at work? Food and tchotchkes barely, if ever, really mattered that much compared to how much I liked my job. But, chances to have new experiences? Lead new projects. Learn new technologies. That is what real talent has always wanted.

Nobody can lead like a 5 star general anymore. Command and Control is dead. Communication and ideas must flow freely. And decision making is distributed and pushed out to the front lines, putting decision makers much closer to the customer. This is not new, this is 20 years in the making kind of stuff. Millennials (and the rest of us) want leaders that can coach too and value our whole selves. So please, stop writing and talking about Millennials in the workplace. We get it, there’s a lot of them.

The Many Names of a Talent Acquisition Professional

June 8th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs we discussed last week in What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?, the world of talent acquisition continues to evolve and with it, so do the roles of recruiting professionals. While the titles themselves don’t really matter, it’s important to clearly define roles within your internal recruiting department. Who does what? When & how often? How do you communicate and coordinate as a team? When building a talent acquisition team, clear allocations of roles & responsibilities is crucial.

But back to the many job titles of a recruitment professional — to prove to you just how many options there are we brainstormed as many names as we could, not including level and geography denotations like “junior” or “regional.” You can also add many more dimensions by adding specific functional recruiting like “technical/IT” or “marketing” and industries like “life sciences” or “healthcare” to define the types of roles and sectors the recruiting professional works with. We excluded words & phrases like “contract” “part time” or “remote”, which do play large part in talent strategy but add too many possibilities to the list. Finally, you can also get pay homage to your culture with creative adjectives like “Off-centered Recruiter” or “Rockstar Recruiter” so we left those out too.

By the end of it, we came up with 154 titles for talent acquisition professionals. Are we missing any? As social media and drip marketing evolves, we are on the look out for new roles & titles that specialize in new sourcing channels in candidate communications/engagement. Comment below if you have a title to add!

  1. Campus Recruiter
  2. Campus Recruitment Manager
  3. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  4. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  5. Chief People Officer
  6. Chief Talent Officer
  7. College Recruiter
  8. Contingent Workforce Manager
  9. Contract Recruiter
  10. Corporate Recruiter
  11. Corporate Recruitment Lead
  12. Deputy Head of Recruitment
  13. Direct Recruiter
  14. Direct Recruitment Specialist
  15. Director – Executive Recruitment
  16. Director – Strategic Resourcing
  17. Executive Recruiter
  18. Executive Recruiting Leader
  19. Executive Recruitment Manager
  20. Executive Search Lead
  21. Executive Talent Acquisition
  22. Executive Talent Sourcing Manager
  23. Experienced Hire Recruiter
  24. Experienced Hire Recruitment Manager
  25. External Candidate Developer
  26. Global Graduate Resourcing Manager
  27. Global Program Manager – Employer Branding
  28. Global Talent Selection Manager
  29. Graduate Recruiter
  30. Graduate Recruitment Advisor
  31. Graduate Recruitment Manager
  32. Head of Campus Recruitment
  33. Head of Client Services (RPO)
  34. Head of Graduate Recruitment
  35. Head of Graduates, Apprentices, & Resourcing
  36. Head of In-house Executive Search
  37. Head of Projects – Talent Acquisition
  38. Head of Recruitment
  39. Head of Recruitment Operations
  40. Head of Recruitment Projects
  41. Head of Recruitment Strategy
  42. Head of Resourcing
  43. Head of RPO Projects
  44. Head of Senior Hires Recruitment
  45. Head of Student Recruitment
  46. Head of Talent Acquisition
  47. Headhunter
  48. HR Manager – Recruitment
  49. HR Manager – Resourcing
  50. HR Staffing Specialist
  51. Hybrid Recruiter
  52. In-house Recruiter
  53. Inhouse Recruitment Consultant
  54. Internal Recruiter
  55. Internal Recruiter – Interns & Apprenticeships
  56. Internal Recruitment Manager
  57. Internal Talent Acquisition Manager
  58. Internet Recruiter
  59. Lateral Recruiter
  60. Lateral Recruitment Manager
  61. Lead Recruiter
  62. Lead Sourcing Consultant
  63. Lead Talent Scout
  64. Leadership Recruiter
  65. Manager – Executive Search
  66. Manager – Talent Systems & Resourcing
  67. MBA Recruiter
  68. MBA Recruitment Manager
  69. Onsite Account Director/RPO Account Director
  70. Onsite Account Manager/RPO Account Manager
  71. People Manager
  72. Principal Delivery Consultant
  73. Principal Recruitment Specialist
  74. Recruiter
  75. Recruiter / Sourcer
  76. Recruiting Coordinator
  77. Recruiting Researcher
  78. Recruitment & Engagement Manager
  79. Recruitment Account Manager
  80. Recruitment Advisor
  81. Recruitment Business Partner
  82. Recruitment Consultant
  83. Recruitment Director
  84. Recruitment Executive
  85. Recruitment Lead
  86. Recruitment Manager
  87. Recruitment Marketing Manager
  88. Recruitment Officer
  89. Recruitment Operations Manager
  90. Recruitment Partner
  91. Recruitment Program Manager
  92. Recruitment Representative
  93. Recruitment Specialist
  94. Recruitment Strategy & Planning Manager
  95. Recruitment Team Lead
  96. Recruitment Team Leader
  97. Researcher
  98. Resource Consultant
  99. Resource Partner
  100. Resourcer
  101. Resourcing & Recruitment Manager
  102. Resourcing Advisor
  103. Resourcing Associate
  104. Resourcing Business Partner
  105. Resourcing Director
  106. Resourcing Lead
  107. Resourcing Manager
  108. Resourcing Partner
  109. Resourcing Program Lead
  110. Resourcing Relationship Manager
  111. Resourcing Specialist
  112. RPO Lead
  113. Senior Recruiter
  114. Service Delivery Manager
  115. Sourcer
  116. Sourcing Advisor
  117. Sourcing Director
  118. Sourcing Manager
  119. Sourcing Specialist
  120. Sourcing Team Leader
  121. Staffing Channels Intelligence Researcher
  122. Staffing Consultant
  123. Staffing Manager
  124. Staffing Specialist
  125. Strategic Recruitment Lead
  126. Strategic Sourcing Recruiter
  127. Supplier Relationship Manager
  128. Talent Acquisition Administrator
  129. Talent Acquisition Advisor
  130. Talent Acquisition Associate
  131. Talent Acquisition Business Partner
  132. Talent Acquisition Consultant
  133. Talent Acquisition Coordinator
  134. Talent Acquisition Director
  135. Talent Acquisition Lead
  136. Talent Acquisition Leader
  137. Talent Acquisition Manager
  138. Talent Acquisition Operations Manager
  139. Talent Acquisition Partner/Business Partner – Talent Acquisition
  140. Talent Acquisition Program Manager
  141. Talent Acquisition Recruiter
  142. Talent Attraction Consultant
  143. Talent Attraction Specialist
  144. Talent Consultant – Executive Search
  145. Talent Data & Research Specialist
  146. Talent Engagement Advisor
  147. Talent Identification Manager
  148. Talent Magnet
  149. Talent Partner
  150. Talent Recruiter
  151. Talent Scout
  152. Talent Search Manager
  153. Talent Sourcer
  154. Talent Sourcing Lead
  155. Talent Sourcing Lead
  156. Talent Sourcing Manager
  157. Talent Sourcing Partner
  158. Talent Sourcing Specialst
  159. Talent Specialist
  160. University Relations Recruiter
  161. University Staffing Consultant
  162. Vendor Management Specialist -Talent Acquisition
  163. Vendor Manager – Recruitment

Need help structuring your talent acquisition department?

Recruitment-Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?

June 1st, 2016

talent-sourcer-sourcing-roleAs Talent Acquisition evolves, so do the roles involved in the process. One of the first challenges when deciding to hire new talent, is identifying the talent itself. Usually, the team member who tackles this challenge is the Talent Sourcer, also referred to as a Sourcing Specialist, Sourcer, Internet Recruiter, Recruiting Researcher, Candidate Attraction Specialist or Talent Scout. What does the Talent Sourcer do on a daily basis?

In it’s most standard definition, a Sourcer’s function in Talent Acquisition is the proactive identification of candidates that match a desired skill set for a current or future job opening. Yet, it is certainly more involved and detailed than such a general definition. While a Recruiter often handles the back end of Talent Acquisition, the Sourcer will handle the primary responsibilities of the process.

A Talent Sourcer is responsible for creating the Sourcing Strategy, which sets the entire process up for success. With strategy in hand, Sourcers proactively identify and engage with skilled workers to fill a current or future need, often gauging and generating interest in the opportunity. Depending on the strategy, reaching out to possible candidates via social media, email, and/or phone calls is also included in the Sourcer’s daily tasks.

While a quick phone screen may included, a Talent Sourcer usually stops short of interviewing and dispositioning, as well as on-boarding and negotiating offers. Sourcers and Recruiters work hand-in-hand, but tend to have defined roles during the recruitment process. Without defined roles and responsibilities, Talent Acquisition can quickly become scattered, and ultimately lack the efficiency that drives a great candidate experience.

Need to define the roles on your talent acquisition team?

Recruitment-Assessment

What is the purpose of a recruitment strategy?

May 25th, 2016

what-is-the-purpose-of-recruitment-strategyWhat is the purpose of a recruitment strategy? What is the point of any strategy? A strategy defines the big and important questions. Who, what, when, and why. Who is doing what by when? And why are they doing it? Your recruiting strategy hopefully creates an efficient use of company resources to provide the best talent your business needs to get the job done. Your strategy may even create a productive advantage in your marketplace!

So what’s the purpose? A recruitment strategy creates proactivity and clarity of purpose in your process of attracting and selecting talent for your business and aligns talent acquisition goals to the business goals.

A recruitment strategy starts with clearly understanding your company’s values in order to best define and understand the employee behaviors you want to attract. A recruitment strategy also clearly articulates a company’s purpose or vision for the future. A well executed recruitment strategy will also align employees to the specific behaviors that are encouraged in the company.

A recruitment strategy has the distinct purpose of deciding how talent will be identified and attracted to the business, how the employer brand will be marketed to talent and ultimately how candidates will be evaluated for employment.

Attracting talent relies on your recruiting brand. How will you position and describe your company and its brand in an authentic way? Where will you promote your company? This is where good job descriptions, score cards, job postings, recruitment technology, and recruitment partners come into play. Today, no one can be the best at their entire strategy.

Evaluation of talent is also a huge part of your recruitment strategy. Do you want your managers to talk with recruits about how they got into the business and oversell why you company is great? Or will you define the questions and role of your managers as you create hiring teams? Always define the team roles in evaluating talent. Set evaluation processes and standards to ensure talent is attracted and evaluated in a consistent way!

A recruitment strategy defines the following:

  • A solution to meet a business challenge: for example, need to hire 1500 employees to open a new plant in New York, or need to hire 75 sales people to expand into new regional territories
  • How you will find and attract talent
  • Your hiring process and how you will evaluate talent
  • How you will leverage the company business plan to highlight your employer brand promise. (Why us versus competitor!)
  • Budget for recruitment
  • Resource allocation – both internally and with partners who will help carry out strategy

Need help defining or have a gap in your recruiting strategy?

Recruitment-Assessment

3 Things a Headhunter Won’t Do For You

May 18th, 2016

headhunters-jobThere are many misconceptions about headhunters. As a job seeker, it can be frustrating if you expect a headhunter to do certain things and then they don’t. To help clear the air a little, here are 3 things that a headhunter won’t do for you.

Headhunters won’t:

  1. Read between the lines. If you’re not clear about your must haves or absolutely nots, headhunters won’t consider the things that are important to you in their communications with the employer. Don’t make assumptions that either the headhunter simply understands where you’re coming from or that they can decode your round-about way of communicating your priorities. Be clear with salary expectations, benefits, things you will do and aren’t interested in doing in a job, where you will travel and won’t, etc. That way the headhunter can find a good fit or negotiate terms. Oh, and if things change — make sure you let the headhunter know— I’ll reiterate that headhunters are not mind readers.
  2. Do all the work for you. Job seekers often assume that because a headhunter agrees to meet them, that they will find them a job. This is not the case. A headhunter’s job is to find the right candidate for their client, an employer who is paying for their recruitment services. In some cases, they may present you to other companies as well, but most often that is because they have other clients with similar needs. No headhunter will be able to find a job for every single person who contacts their recruiting firm. If a headhunter is presenting you to an employer for a job (that’s great!), make sure you’re tracking down other job leads as well.
  3. Tell you what you like to do or what you’re good at. It’s not a headhunter’s responsibility to tell you what career path to pursue, what types of things you like to do, or what you excel at doing. It may be tough, but if you’re struggling with what to do with your life — that’s up to you and only you to figure out. You can talk to friends and family to sort through pros and cons and receive guidance, our you can hire a career coach, but don’t lean on a headhunter. But when you do figure it all out, by all means, give a headhunter a call!

How is talent sourcing different from recruiting?

May 13th, 2016

recruiter-vs-sourcing-specialistRecruiting in the traditional sense includes at the very least some talent sourcing. Both sourcing and recruiting are often intertwined skills and responsibilities. But more recently, Talent Acquisition strategy is trending toward a more specialized approach, separating talent sourcing and recruiting roles. So what’s the difference between sourcing and recruiting, anyway?

Typically, recruiting includes reworking job descriptions, choosing candidates from a pipeline, leading the interview process, and managing offers and on-boarding. Specifically, recruiting does not often include the proactive identification of candidates outside of the talent pipeline. That pipeline is the product of excellent talent sourcing.

Successful talent sourcing requires a thoughtful and detailed strategy. Identifying, engaging, generating interest, and ultimately building a pipeline of candidates can either make or break the talent acquisition process. Therefore, sourcing talent has become a specialized skill set, requiring in-depth knowledge of techniques, tools, and channels that differ from the skill set and strengths of a recruiter.

Of course, Talent Acquisition thrives on the consistency and collaboration of both talent sourcing and recruiting. Consequently, there is a emphasis on information sharing and teamwork for either to be deemed successful. Don’t be afraid to think about your recruiting process critically — you just may identify a weakness that could be easily corrected.

Why Managers are Failing to Hire – It’s not always HR’s Fault

May 4th, 2016

Often, managers keep C talent in roles too long. Here’s why networking can help.

First, it’s important to understand what today’s economy and labor market look like:

  1. There are a lot of job openings.
  2. Unemployment is low.
  3. 1 in 3 workers that is happy, however, they intend to change jobs.

Yes, we are now in a market where happy workers are moving around and ready for their next challenge!

In a candidate’s market, what do managers do about hiring for their team/department/division? I know what they do. Complain to Human Resources and to their boss that they are not seeing enough talent for their openings. I hear this everyday from customers. And we tell them the same thing every time. Failing managers count on others to find talent for their organizations. And then blame HR or Talent Acquisition teams.  

This is why failing managers keep average or below average talent. In survey after survey, managers admit they keep sub par talent because they have no one else to do the job. Which is another way of saying that they don’t intend to do that job either. They are simply happy with the notion that someone is doing the work. But the failing employees are not happy! The employees are missing time, or making mistakes, and causing havoc with the rest of the team. Aren’t leaders responsible for budgets, productivity and results? Of course.

how-to-hire-a-players-coverSo why not network to go from being an average or failing leader to one who networks and fills their own jobs? This is what I call keeping your sofa full. (Check out chapter 7 in How to Hire A Players by Eric Herrenkohl.)

Failing (C players) managers blame others and do nothing.

Winning Leaders (A players) get out out to meet talent at trade shows, industry events, chamber meetings, or at civic and social clubs. Leaders get out to build their network. To meet people. To offer help and create value. But they are always working on building their bench and know who their next hire is going to be!

Which type of leader are you?

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