Category: Customer Stories

How Smaller Businesses Can Attract Quality IT Talent

October 19th, 2016

Many companies experience difficulty attracting qualified information technology candidates. Specifically, smaller businesses face even more of a challenge. A rapid growth in the technology space has led to incredible value for even the smallest of businesses to invest in IT software and processes. In turn, IT talent has become increasingly in demand. From offering sky-high salaries and generous benefits, businesses are pulling out all of the stops to try to attract technology talent.Programmer at computer desk working on program design. Software concept. Vector illustration flat design. Man working at desktop computer laptop. Coding web technology. Development applications.

So what can small businesses do to beat their bigger competition for this niche pool?

Look internally and locally. While not all businesses have a robust IT department, it may be worth identifying any talent already in the company who would be able to step up. In addition, hiring from within cuts down on expenses related to training a new employee on business processes. Try partnering with local schools or programs to attract computer science majors, offering an exciting opportunity before the future candidate hits the open job market.

If your recruitment team has identified external candidates, its important to make quick decisions. Do not leave candidates dangling, he or she knows the demand for their skill set. IT candidates likely already have other offers and any delays give other companies an opportunity make the first move. High level professionals wont often sit around waiting for a decision.

Also, think outside of the box when attempting to attract IT candidates. While salary is important, smaller businesses can compete by marketing the opportunity for development and training. Tech talent values a work/life balance, and the flexibility to work remotely if needed. Perhaps offer to pay for a certification of interest to the candidate, as IT professionals also value the opportunity to work on exciting projects and have meanin

gful and purposeful work. Its crucial to focus on where the company is headed, and what future investments in technology are coming. What’s the 3 year plan?

Small businesses must play to their strengths to attract and retain Information Technology candidates. What can you offer that is more valuable than the soaring salaries offered by large organizations? A work/life balance, ongoing training, and true feeling of value to the company may set you apart when recruiting IT talent.


What’s Your Social Media Recruiting Presence?

October 12th, 2016

Social media use has jumped dramatically in the past decade; almost two-thirds of Americans were active on social media networks in 2015, up from only seven percent a decade earlier. This substantial increase in social media usage presents a significant opportunity for Recruiters to reach more potential candidates, and customers, if used and promoted the correct way.

Social media use in job searches on the riseInternet of things and cloud computing concept - wifi outline by cloud computing and Internet of things concept icons

A 2015 Pew Research Center study on the role of the Internet in job searches found that almost two-thirds of Americans who use social media have used social networks in some part of their job search process. Specifically, 35 percent of social media users turn to the various social networks as they research and search for potential jobs, and 34 percent of users share information on available jobs with friends and family. This trend is particularly pronounced for Millennials, an important demographic for employers seeking candidates to grow within the business. Forty-three percent of social media users between the ages of 18 and 29 have used social media in the process of searching for and researching open positions, and 40 percent of users in this age group have informed others of job opportunities through social networks.

Why you should be all over Social Media

Recruiters and Sourcers can focus their entire social media presence on their expertise, providing oneself with much greater visibility to the potential workforce and customers who are looking to fill a number of roles. Due to the nature of the business, and the difficulty connecting with passive candidates specifically, building a large professional network outside of LinkedIn can set you apart from the competition.

Talent acquisition professionals are also able to build robust networks on social media by cultivating connections with individuals who have been placed in the past, or even just spoken to about a particular role. These former placements, who are often potential candidates for future roles themselves, bring with them their networks of friends and family. Referrals and recommendations are a fantastic source for recruiters to not only build their network, but also develop new talent pools to target during a search.

What’s it mean?

As social media use rises and gains importance in the job search process and recruiting in general, the ability to reach the broadest range of candidates on social media will be key in identifying the best talent. Of equal importance is how social media is used by recruiters; with job promotion and marketing being key. Utilizing social media to market jobs, while also sourcing and identifying candidates with profiles or social media activity – who might not be found elsewhere – a focus on your social profile can create huge benefits in the long run.

Fastest Growing Industries: Who Will Need Help?

October 5th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs the US Economy continues to recover slowly from the economic downturn of 2008, certain industries are booming, and a few you may not think of right away. Consequently, there are industries that can’t find talent fast enough. According to Economic Modeling Specialist International, CareerBuilder’s labor market analysis branch, these industries will be adding thousands of jobs, but are challenged in recruiting the talent to grow at such a pace. What are a few industries that will grow the fastest?

1. Online and Electronic Shopping

It’s no secret that online shopping has changed the way people purchase goods. For those looking for a job, this is the fastest growing industry out there. Companies such as Amazon and eBay have become huge hits with the general public. In such case, expertise in high volume hiring and recruiting is key. Do you have your own talent that specializes in sourcing and recruiting huge numbers of candidates for the retail field?  In the next five years, the industry is projected to add close to 80,000 jobs, a 32% increase.

2. Translator and Interpreter Services

As the workforce continues to diversify, people who speak a second language are at a premium. From businesses to hospitals and everywhere in between, translators are in high demand. This industry will witness job growth close to 30%. At the same time, talent acquisition professionals who speak more than one language can really carve out a niche to partner with businesses to help hire and recruit bi-lingual candidates.

3. Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapists

Modern medicine continues to advance and is truly a miracle of science. People are getting back to work more quickly, but patients require a large amount of therapy to return to the workforce or even get out of bed. This means plenty of available jobs for those who are licensed in various fields of therapy. This industry will add close to 100,000 jobs in the next five years, representing a 25% increase. The challenge is identifying and retaining these therapists as the industry booms and candidates are more sought after.

Job growth can almost always translate into talent acquisition growth. Businesses and industries with excelling job creation need help recruiting talent. Positioning yourself as an Talent Acquisition expert in a certain industry can put you at an advantage over competition. Do you need need help identifying talent in high-growth industries? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450.



Do You Really Know Who Would be Best for Your Team?

September 28th, 2016

When there are open positions to fill, you have the chance to add team members who can enhance your current status quo and take your company to the next level.  On the other hand, if you hire the wrong people, you could be facing an epic fail that will be costly on budget, as poor hiring decisions typically result in expensive turnover costs.

flat vector design of employees or executives in meeting. this vector also represents company meetings discussions and opinions employee interaction & engagement

So, how do you combat the potential pitfalls and find people who will be perfect for your team?  Many decision-makers are far removed from the day-to-day tasks of the people under them.  Ironically, these same leaders are often the people tasked with choosing which candidates to hire.  When you take a step back, and look at the bigger picture, this system is set up for failure.  If you want to hire folks who will truly fit well with your existing team, you need to go directly to the source, and seek input from the people who will be working next to the new colleague.  Remove yourself from your role as a leader, and become a learner, the results can be astonishing!


Gathering Employee Feedback Boosts Engagement

When you seek assistance from your existing staff, employees will appreciate the fact that you trust them enough to want their feedback.  This simple act shows that you trust your team and want what’s best for them — two key elements to boosting existing employee engagement.  If you don’t want to be stuck filling more positions in the near future, it’s vital to learn how to build and retain employee engagement at every opportunity.

Integrating the Input of Existing Employees

Before you even begin calling candidates into your conference rooms, consult with your team members.  Begin by bringing everyone in as a group.  This will allow people to bounce ideas off each other as suggestions are made.  Make note of the following characteristics:

  • What do they do everyday?
  • What traits make the existing team work well together?
  • What are the downsides to the work they do?  (Although this isn’t a pretty question, the honesty can help open discussion for further improvement in the future, and it can help you identify candidates who can withstand the downfalls in the meantime.)
  • What can your team or company do to improve?

Each of these questions will likely lead to longer discussions from which you can derive plenty of information that you can take back to leadership regarding both the addition of your new team members, as well as changes that should be considered for your existing employees.

Invite Your Employees to the Interviews

Rather than relying on your instinct, bring a team member or two to the interviews.  They will likely think of questions you may not have even considered, and when it’s time to choose the right candidate, you’ll be able to gather a more well-rounded general consensus.


What are your thoughts about integrating existing employees into the hiring process?  We’d love to hear your opinions!  Join in the conversation by leaving a comment below, or head over to our Outside-In Facebook page!

How to Make Your Business a Talent Magnet

September 21st, 2016

Every company, large and small is challenged when it comeVector business conceptual background in flat style. The hand of businessman holding magnet and attracts happy customers or clients of different age and race to the business.s to attracting, developing, and retaining the best talent. For decades now, “lean” has been the buzz word in manufacturing. The lean business model has spread across industries, including the recruitment of quality talent. Here are a few tips to help you attract and keep the best and brightest, while remaining efficient:


What if, instead of bearing the cost of recruitment, (fees, travel expenses, etc.) you could have all the top candidates be drawn to you like a magnet? Corporations such as Apple and Google have perfected the art of employer magnetism. But you don’t have to be a tech giant to create a similar attraction.

Businesses need to focus on creating a workplace environment in which people enjoy working, according to Roberta Matusun, author of Talent Magnetism: How to Build a Workplace That Attracts and Keeps the Best. She also points out that, apart from the product or service they offer to consumers, businesses should also brand themselves as an employer.

Create Purpose

A mid-sized California BioPharm company has been able to capture the element of purpose. They boast a job satisfaction rate of 77% of their 18,000 employees. Almost all of them (90%) stated that they feel as though they have a “high job meaning.” Purpose is especially important when you are targeting a younger workforce as Millennial generation; it is said, work for the purpose, not the pay.

How to Create Purpose

Graham Kenny, writing for the Harvard Business Review says purpose, is not a company’s values, mission or vision. Your purpose statement needs to say; “this is what we are doing for our customers.”  To craft an effective purpose statement, it is important to convey the impact your organization has on the lives of the people it serves. Success in this area will inspire your employees to become invested.

Engage, Motivate, Retain

Face it, at times it is simply hard to get out of bed in the morning. Imagine working in an environment where you wouldn’t be missed if you didn’t show up at all. It is imperative that the modern workplace is structured to make employees feel integral to the day-to-day operations. Doing so creates a culture of engagement and a feeling that the success of their organization is dependent on the full participation of each individual, no matter their position. When employees feel motivated, they become more engaged, and that translates directly into improved retention.

By creating a corporate culture in which employees enjoy working, feel they have a purpose, and understand how they connect to the overall “big picture,” you will not only attract the most desirable talent but most importantly, inspire them to stay.

8 Candidate Traits to Thoroughly Vet

September 14th, 2016

As a recruiter, it is your responsibility to recruit quality employees, whether for your client, or internally. Depending on the size of your company or client, you likely get plenty of resumes each day, or identify plenty of potential talent. So how can you tell early on in the process if a candidate is possibly no the best fit?

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#1 Long Gaps Between Jobs

With the unemployment rate what it has been these days, it is very uncommon to find long gaps between jobs on a candidate’s resume. While it is common to have a gap or two at one point in their career, if you have an applicant with long gaps between jobs, there should be a good reason. Childbirth, education, and being self-employed are valid reasons, however; if there is no explanation for the gap, it is a red flag.

#2 The Applicant is Unemployed

The first thing you would need to do is find out why the person is no longer employed. If the applicant was fired or they quit, they may not be the best person to recruit., but its worth vetting. Dive into their thinking and reasoning to make your decision. If they have been unemployed for a long period of time and out of the workforce, their jobs skills may not be as fresh as other applicants.

#3 Job Hopping

Going from job to job could mean that the candidate cannot commit to a job. When things get tough, the applicant doesn’t stay. Hiring this type of employee can waste the company’s time and money to hire and train someone to replace the individual.

#4 Poor Attention to Detail

One of the biggest red flags when going through resumes is spelling errors. If the candidate couldn’t take the time to proofread their resume, chances are, they won’t be dedicated to their role after hiring. Someone who took the time to thoughtfully and accurately put together their experience indicates more of a quality candidate.

#5 Lack of Professionalism

Professionalism is a must when it comes to recruiting employees. You should look for professionalism in their resume, the first phone call, and the interview. If an applicant shows a lack of professionalism, its crucial to dissect their true personality during interviews.

#6 Social Profile

A potential employee’s social profile can say a lot about them. You can learn a lot about a person by looking at their social profile. If the employee had posted any derogatory or disparaging comments about a job, employer, or former employer, it is a huge red flag. You don’t want to recruit a person who has no problem posting this type of negativity for the world to see.

#7 Discrepancies

If you are reviewing a potential candidate’s resume and LinkedIn profile and find discrepancies, it could be cause for concern. Either they are lying on their resume, they are forgetful when it comes to dates, or they are just plain sloppy. No matter the reason, not the best sign for quality talent.

#8 The Applicant is Overqualified

Some recruiters might find that an overqualified applicant to be a dream come true, however, it really isn’t. If the applicant is overqualified, it could be he or she is looking for a job to hold them over until they can find a better job. Also, they could get bored, and want to move on quickly. Take time to thoroughly vet the reasons for their interest.

Need help identifying quality talent? We can help! Give us a call at (302) 266-0860 

How to Attract and Retain STEM Professionals

September 7th, 2016

Illustration of STEM education in apply science concept

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) professionals are in incredibly high demand. Government agencies and research organizations have a variety of definitions for what constitutes a STEM professional, but it generally includes the following career paths for employers in the United States:

  • Science: life sciences such as biology and geoscience, hard sciences like chemistry and physics, and social sciences such as psychology, sociology, and economics
  • Technology: computer and information technology, cyberinfrastructure, nanotechnology, robotics, geographic information systems, software engineering and development
  • Engineering: civil, electrical, aerospace, industrial, and mechanical engineering
  • Mathematics: applied mathematics, statistics, actuarial science

There are several other subfields within STEM that intersect with similar career paths as well, such as biomechanical engineering. When most private sector employers think of STEM they tend to think of high-tech professionals like software developers, engineers, and data scientists since the needs (and average compensation) for the applied sciences and mathematics fields are not homogenous with that of high-tech and engineering.

Each field and subfield has various roles and expectations in the workplace. According to surveys of STEM graduates, higher starting salaries are extremely important to computer science and engineering technology professionals but mathematicians and life scientists value diverse workplaces with strong camaraderie, rather than going for the organization offering the highest paycheck.

Other integral findings for what STEM professionals are looking for in the workplace include the following:

  • Benefits that are meaningful. Benefit packages actually outrank starting salary in terms of what STEM professionals look at when they compare potential employers. Are you offering a competitive amount of flex time, sick days, maternity and paternity leave, transit benefits, medical benefits, and other perks that are important for attracting and retaining high-value employees?
  • Opportunities for personal growth and advancement. Regardless of where the professional falls on the STEM spectrum, all are seeking opportunities for personal growth like working on projects that are important to them, being challenged, and having a supportive work environment conducive to this kind of growth. If your projects can give also give him or her a chance to improve their communities, they highly value that opportunity more than enviable starting salaries.
  • Job security. Job hopping is the new normal in many fields today and most people want job security. However, STEM professionals highly covet job security over other factors in their work environment when selecting an employer. If you recruit primarily on a project basis or have high turnover rates, your organization will have a hard time attracting quality STEM candidates.
  • Inclusive and supportive company culture. STEM professionals greatly desire diversity and recognition for doing a great job over a casual atmosphere that offers craft beer on tap and ping pong tables. Make sure that your website and promotional materials demonstrate great company culture.
  • Assignments are clearly-defined. STEM professionals want to work in organizations where they don’t have to sift through middle management and oblique mission statements to figure out what they’re working on. If your company is known for getting down to brass to business, be sure to market your business in that way.


Why the World Loves and Hates Executive Search Solutions

August 24th, 2016

The world loves Executive Search because it is easy, with either no or low commitment. In the world of contingency, you may not know my name or company logo but if I have the rare talent you need — you don’t seem to really care who I am all of that much.

Hiring managers (aka an expert in something other than hiring),  are happy to offload and delegate what they don’t like or know enough about — and that includes finding talent. This is strategic right? Outsource non-core tasks. Or is it lazy?

Executive Search Solutions

When people and culture are important to a company, leaders better be up to snuff in best in class hiring techniques. This is the quandary. Leaders and hiring managers know what’s expected of them, but can’t be good at everything. They understand that they are supposed to make talent important, but often don’t have the hiring infrastructure and support in place to be good at it. So, what do they do?

They excitedly or begrudgingly work with Search Firms.

We are your worst nightmare. The world hates Search Firms like mine because the service offers an expensive cost per hire. We are your last resort. Everyone in the business wants to avoid working with the dreaded executive search industry. You brag when you cut our costs. Sometimes it is the goal, lower hiring costs. But at what true expense and impact if you can’t find the talent you need to execute your business?

Nonetheless, you choose this, because you frankly have no other choice. Build expensive, scaled hiring infrastructure or pay someone for one hire who has that hiring process down pat and in place.

Don’t hate me for the honesty. Search firms exist on the fringes of your strategy at best. And I  know some great search firms, including my own. But we know our place. When we win, Human Resources sometimes feels like they lose, that we did their job or something. That should not be the case — the Search process works best when the firm partners with Human Resources and the Hiring Managers. When we are a part of the overall solution-building process. When we are a part of the organizational chart and strategy.

Why Having a Booth at a Job Fair is a Great Way to Recruit New Talent

August 17th, 2016

When it comes to recruiting new talent for your businessTalent Strategy Job Fair, you have multiple options to choose from. You have agencies with a database of talent that they can introduce to you and you even have job boards where prospective employees search and apply for jobs. However, another excellent method of recruiting new talent that you can use as a supplement to your recruiting strategy is through a booth at a job fair. Hosting a booth at a job fair can be an invaluable part of an overall recruitment strategy for your company.

Having a booth or desk at a job fair can have multiple benefits that can serve as a big boost to your overall recruiting endeavors. You will get to meet and interview each and every candidate that approaches your booth out of their curiosity about your company. You will have a chance to determine whether this job seeker is a presentable, well-spoken person who will get along well with your other employees.

Using a job fair as a recruitment strategy can especially be beneficial to companies that are looking for employees who have “soft skills” such as sales, communication, and management. Within a few minutes, you’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be confident, determined, and well-spoken enough to survive in the competitive and volatile world of outside or inside sales. You’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be commanding enough and has enough control over his/her emotions to be able to manage a team of employees every day.

You can save a lot of time and money by only calling back employees who made a good first impression and who meet the criteria you’re looking for on the resume they handed to you at the job fair.

Some employers believe they can do some sort of video conferencing interview to quickly screen candidates instead of participating in a job fair, but you may not have a chance to see as much as you could when you meet a candidate face-to-face. Through video, you may not be able to determine how a person carries himself, what his/her body language is really like, and whether he has a strong presence. All of these factors are definitely important particularly when candidates are seeking jobs where they have to deal with clients on a regular basis.

We highly recommend that you take advantage of the opportunity to host a booth or desk at a job fair. As we mentioned, this gives you the chance to really see job candidates as a whole. How can you find them? Let’s list some ways:

  • Online directories
  • Contact colleges campus officials
  • Find big outdoor events

We have one final tip: pay close attention to what a candidate asks you when one approaches your booth. This will shed light on his/her level of interest as well as his/her intentions.

Is Passive Talent Better Than Active Job Seekers?

August 10th, 2016

Balance weighing two spheres blue and red. Scales measuring abstract objects. Comparison choice confusion exchange and decision concept. EPS 8 vector illustration no transparency

One of the more difficult aspects of sourcing and recruiting is engaging with passive talent. It takes a thoughtful and strategic plan, and even a detailed plan isn’t guaranteed to work. So it’s leaves you to wonder — is passive talent better than active candidates, anyway?

The answer isn’t clear. There are benefits to both hiring active and passive talent. Passive talent is often that very niche pool of candidates that has a specialized skill set, and therefore highly sought and generally very valuable to any company. Therefore, recruiting passive talent can be expensive and time consuming, especially without an efficient talent acquisition process.

Active candidates are at least keeping their ears open for a new opportunity and often pursuing those roles proactively. Sometimes, this can mean the candidate is more willing to make a move, will make that move more quickly, and for less of a salary increase. At the same time, why are they actively looking for a new role, good or bad?

Again, it’s hard to determine if one type of candidate is better than the other. Both have their traditional qualities, and both could be the absolute right fit for your company. Generally, having a preference before going into the recruiting process could create undesirable gaps in your talent acquisition process.

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