Category: Outside-In®


Outside-In® Chronicles: Why is Bruce Springsteen Called The Boss?

March 11th, 2015

I recently attended my first Bruce Springsteen concert this past week in Hershey, PA. We talk about leaders only being leaders when they have followers. Well Bruce has followers. After all, he is the Boss, right? I bet you don’t know why he is called the boss. Well, back in the early (glory) days he was the one who had to collect the night’s receipts and be responsible for distributing the money to bandmates. At first, Bruce hated the name because of what boss typically means as a stereotype. I think it’s safe to say at this point he has tacitly accepted his moniker. And after watching him play for three hours and ten minutes with barely a sip of water? There is no doubt in my mind that he is in charge, in control, and on top of every little detail as a master showman can be. He is The Boss today but for very different reasons than way back when!

After watching his performance I can assure you he is a good leader. He has such high energy and regard for people including his bandmates and crew, the fans, and all those that he can help. (Bruce brought seven different fans on stage to jam with him, sing, and to share their cause). Without fear or thought that they might in anyway be there to hurt or harm him or others!

All of this Boss talk got me thinking. Do you like being called boss? I had a favorite administrative assistant who called me jefe, which means boss and I hated it. She insisted she meant it in a different meaning than the stereotype. Jefe meant that I was in charge and that she could count on me.

So I looked up the definition of boss. And guess what I learned?

Boss as a noun seems reasonable enough to me. Someone in charge of a team or organization. Each culture and its value is different in each group however, someone, is always responsible for a team—even in self-directed teams.

So how about Boss as the adjective? Boss means excellent or outstanding. If everyone can be the boss and live up to excellence or be outstanding then let’s all get name tags! An environment of results and outstanding can’t be all bad, right?

ID-10066133Now we are getting into it. Boss as the verb. To dictate. To lord over. To domineer. To push around. To browbeat. To create undue pressure. This is where the stereotype exists!

No one wants to work for a boss. Few people tolerate dictators or lords if they can help it.  No one wants second class treatment when they can be equally important. I’m sure that being pushed around or browbeat isn’t motivating for long. Bossing and managing by fear mongering works for as long as the Boss has power. Which is usually only as long as it takes employees to figure out what to do about it.

So unless you’re Bruce Springsteen, be careful about acting like a boss!

How the Outside-In® Companies Do The Whole Trust Thing

March 4th, 2015

Last week, my company celebrated a Values Holiday around our core value of Trust. Every twenty or so business days we focus our attention on reinforcing one of our twenty values. This is incredibly powerful stuff as “culture work” helps us all be mindful of expected behaviors in our workplace. I jump out of bed every single day because our values are ubiquitous to all the roles we play and all the people we meet.

Trust for me was learned behavior. Not that I was untrustworthy as a young person. I just did not understand that my very character was shaped by my words, thoughts, and actions. I remember being a young college kid just starting to date (the girl who I knew was the one, and I married her!) Kim held my up to high standard and I guess her perspective and opinion really mattered to me so I lived up to it. She simply taught me to be trustworthy by expecting it and as in any important relationship, I did not want to let her down. I think the challenge for all of us is to adopt this approach in more of the relationships in our life, not just the ones that we consider the most important!

So, I decided to do a survey on what constitutes trust in a relationship and I asked my team, “What type of actions and behaviors build trust?” Everyone has had different insights and experiences that shape them, however, all are valuable points of views. I hope you enjoy the trust thoughts as much as I did!

  1. ID-100250128Being reliable.
  2. Being up front with one another.
  3. Honesty.
  4. Constructive criticism.
  5. Do what you say you will do.
  6. When the person follows through, and does what they say they are going to do.
  7. When you do something to assist the other person, without having to be asked, or better yet, when they are not expecting it.
  8. Consistency.
  9. Reliability.
  10. Trust is something earned, not something that is given. Trust is earned over time as people prove that they are people of their word and simply that they are worthy of trust.
  11. Without a doubt, honesty builds a relationship more than anything else. Honesty is an essential building block, and without it you don’t have much, if anything!
  12. Honesty. Consistent, unwavering, believable honesty.
  13. Knowing someone on a personal level and their ability to be direct in communication.
  14. I am really impressed, and inclined to go the extra mile, when someone helps me even though it was not necessary or expected. They just helped me because they were being team-based, or simply generous. That makes me see the person differently and help them at any opportunity. It is more than returning a favor. It is more like I have elevated that person to a new level of respect. It doesn’t even have to be something done for me – it can simply be that I observed a person’s kindness when “no one was looking”. That is big for me.
  15.  Aaaahhhh Trust. Trust is like money yet more valuable. It takes time to build or accumulate, but can be blown in an instant of bad decision. What builds trust? Proving you’re trustworthy not by what you say, but by doing what you said you would do. In order to maintain trust, one must be honest, humble, and genuine.
  16. Being honest and following through while not “over-talking” others. By “over-talking,” I’m referring to talking at a higher level than necessary or for the audience to understand. Always strikes me as dishonest and that they are doing it to hide or shade over something.
  17. For me, the formation of trust occurs over time, and with effort from both sides. I think one of the reasons that our team works so well together is because we’ve developed a deep level of trust of over the past six months. We take the time to genuinely get to know each other, as colleagues and as friends. We build trust both at work and outside of work, even if it’s as simple as a 30 minute lunch where we talk about our families. An important component of building trust is earning it by following through on tasks, or being there to lend a hand without being asked. I trust that my team will support my decisions and be there if I need council. I also trust that they will not take judgement, and instead will help me to learn and grow from the situation.

Trust is a two way street. And my favorite insight from the team? Trust takes much more time to earn than it does to lose it. Gone in a moment as they say.

Take my personal challenge and try to answer the question yourself—how often do you live these suggestions in building trust? All of us can do better. What type of person are you when it comes to trust?

In order for trust to be built, you need a drive commitment from both parties. Both must be open to building and maintaining that trust. Formation of trust takes a long time, but can be lost in a matter of moments.

Trust is a regular deposit in a relationship—it must be balanced but always must be nurtured.

Upcoming 2/26 Talent Seminar: Gore’s Employer Brand Story

February 6th, 2015

Please join us on Thursday, February 26th (7:30-9AM) for our Outside-In® Talent Seminar featuring guest speakers, Graham Williamson and Steve Shuster from W.L. Gore & Associates. A strong employer brand is a sustainable competitive advantage in the quest for talent. Find out what Gore learned on the way to developing their employer brand and what principles you can apply to any organization.

Eventbrite - Outside-In® Seminar: The Happy Harry's Story

WHO SHOULD ATTEND? ID-100248850

You should join us if you are:

  • An HR Leader
  • In Talent Management or Recruiting
  • A business leader planning to implement or improve his/her company’s culture
  • Looking to expand your knowledge on best business practices
  • Seeking HRCI recertification credits*

*This seminar is currently pending approval for HRCI credits.

ABOUT OUR GUEST SPEAKERS

Graham Williamson, Regional Recruiting Leader

grahamGraham provides leadership to W.L. Gore & Associates’ Recruiting team and is part of a global HR leadership team at Gore responsible for aligning the HR strategy with enterprise objectives. For the past twenty years he has been involved in different sectors of the staffing industry from executive search in Europe to consulting and leading recruiting teams. One of his passions is Gore’s work on employer branding and the current global thread through this work is the focus on creating experiences for candidates and businesses that positively differentiate Gore.

Steve Shuster, Global Brand Manager

steveshusterbwSteve has thirty plus years of business experience with W.L. Gore & Associates. During these 30 years he has experienced many roles, such as; sales, marketing, product management, brand management and business leadership. Steve has extensive knowledge in value pricing, product development, market assessment and global markets.

Currently, Steve is the global Enterprise brand leader responsible for growing and protecting the GORE® brand and portfolio of Enterprise brands. For the past five years he has focused on developing and implementing global brand management processes for the Enterprise. In this role he developed, mentored and led associates globally around the importance of adding value to the portfolio of brands within the Enterprise. As part of this role he developed new strategic approaches to branded offerings throughout the Enterprise. Steve also co leads the Global Employer brand initiative. Steve is also a passionate champion for the Gore culture. At this point in his career his energy is derived from helping others grow through leadership development mentoring and coaching.

What Does it Mean to “Earn the Right?”

February 4th, 2015

How many of us know what earning the right actually means? Today, my son asked me if he could go to a friend’s house, and I shared a story with him instead of saying yes or no. I told him that when I want to hike all day on a Saturday with friends, I am certain to find out what I can do around the house on Friday night prior to my fun. His response was a perplexing one; he did not think that he needed to prove himself to anyone to get what he wanted. He simply wanted what he wanted. This may work with a teenager on occasion (especially when his parents get worn down from the barrage of constant requests), but it rarely works in business. The challenge here is that successful staff members figure out how earning the right works, while unsuccessful ones run out of here while the rest of the staff might just help them leave! Earning the right is one of the values that we have at the Outside-In® Companies. To be successful no matter how you define success? This is a prerequisite.

I was recently in a discussion with a colleague who had a meaningful, strategic dialogue with a long time customer of the Outside-In Companies® about how we could help them solve their workforce challenges. This is our wheel house. This is what we live for. This is what we want to do as workforce consultants all day long, every day. Unfortunately, we don’t spend all day doing this. Not all of our relationships challenge us to be our best and I sense that earning the right has 100% to do with it!

EarntheRightEarning the right is when you do the right things in a relationship to earn the privilege to ask for or expect something from someone else. This is relevant on your team. This applies if you work with other teams in the company and it certainly applies if your role is customer facing. Customer facing roles are based on relationships with existing customers, suppliers, new inquiring ones, and anyone that your business comes in close contact with.

In the world of business development and sales, the notion of earning the right is often a source of conflict for sales and service associates. Salespeople have to sell things, they need to ask for next steps and commitments and they must show forward progress. If you’re serving a customer the same is true. You must ask for commitments, information, time and calendar space, and you must be taken seriously to do the job.

Maybe you’re in a company and you need the assistance of others that are not in your team or division to help you get a project done. Although you are passionate and the project is urgent, why should anyone else care or help you? You will have to do more then plead and beg for a lending hand, that is for sure. The work starts well before your need arrives.

To earn the right, you must first understand that earning the right is on you, your cubicle mate, your leader, the founder, and even the janitor. It is critical to understand that we are always in the process of earning the right. Our actions and decisions can knock us down a few rungs on The Relational Ladder. This is a fluid and ongoing process. One that everyone uses (formal or informal) on whether we are going to say yes to anything.

This is why it can take months, years, even decades, to establish what is right with each other, prospects, and customers. Next week, we’ll be talking about the Top Eight Ways to Earn the Right!

What if There Was a “Back to Business” Holiday?

January 7th, 2015

ID-100263930Now that the holidays are behind us, I find myself waking up with the Holiday Blues. The holidays are a constant buzz of exciting activity and stimulation. All of us get so busy preparing, traveling, eating, and then recovering, that the world slowly limps into that first week or two of January. Even if you’re a Scrooge and intend to plow right through the holidays, the world around you is going to slow down so much that there will be less you can do to feel active!

Although the holidays are much needed (and well deserved) for employees, they are not very beneficial for the shareholders and customers of the business. The holiday season causes delays in production and hinders decision making due to limited staff in the office for meetings. Getting back into work and beyond the blues is easier said than done. It will take a few days to dig out from all of those emails, for schedules to free up, and for important meetings to take place. Then maybe decisions will be made and maybe next week business will be normal again.

The frantic pace that built up to the holidays when everything was either done by December 19th or left to January 2nd to deal with has officially dwindled. My point is that it has been a while since we have had a normal business week. I’m not sure we can all survive a five day work week after the frenzied rush before holidays and the post-season blues!

All joking aside, I think we are longing for some normalcy. Forget all of the January stereotypes regarding goal setting, New Year’s resolutions, and new annual business budgets that go live this month. There is so much pressure on performance both personally and professionally; yet there’s only so much we can do about it. I would like to see a business holiday formed inspired by the idea of going back to work now that the holidays are over. Everyone go to work that day and know that the playing field is equal and all businesses will be getting back to the grindstone at the same time—Imagine that!

Now that we’re back in action, we want the phones to ring, the emails to start flying, and for business to get back to normal. We all need this fast because before you know it snow and MLK day will cause the next business delay!

Upcoming 1/29 Talent Seminar: Influencing Cultural Transformation – One Small Step at a Time

January 5th, 2015

Please join us on Thursday, January 29th (7:30-9AM) for our Outside-In® Talent Seminar featuring guest speaker, Beth Bunting Arnholt. Sometimes change requires large-scale process. But often you can have more impact by creating seemingly small opportunities and leveraging them as catalysts. Beth will share how she influences cultural transformation one step at a time in her role as VP Integrated Talent Management at Comcast/NBCUniversal.

Eventbrite - Outside-In® Seminar: The Happy Harry's Story

ID-100289097WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

You should join us if you are:

  • An HR Leader
  • In Talent Management or Recruiting
  • A business leader planning to implement or improve his/her company’s culture
  • Looking to expand your knowledge on best business practices
  • Seeking HRCI recertification credits*

*This seminar is pre-approved for HRCI credits.

ABOUT OUR GUEST SPEAKER

bethbuntingarnholtBeth Bunting Arnholt serves as Vice President of Integrated Talent Management for Comcast/NBCUniversal. In this role she partners across Comcast Corporate, Comcast Cable, and NBCUniversal on the design and implementation of world-class Talent strategies. She works closely with the Cable and NBCUniversal teams to build a culture that takes a future focused, enterprise wide view of talent as a key business driver.

Beth joined Comcast from BDC Consulting where she served for five years as Principal and Owner, providing strategic human resources and organizational development counsel to a variety of companies including Comcast Cable, Conectiv Energy, BAYADA Home Health Care, The Reinvestment Fund, Versus, and The Golf Channel. Prior to BDC Consulting, she held various roles at Comcast Cable, most recently serving as Vice President of Human Resources, and before that, Vice President of Recruiting and Career Development. She also held positions at Acsys Resources, Inc. and Mobil Oil Corporation.

Beth is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board for LeBow College of Business at Drexel University, a Big Sister in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program, a Philadelphia Advisory Committee member for Women of Tomorrow, and actively involved as a mentor for Comcast/NBCUniversal’s Employee Resource Groups and Executive Leadership Forum. She holds a Master in Business Administration from Drexel University and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Delaware. She resides in Garnet Valley, PA with her family.

Everyone is a Leader—How Do You Lead?

December 31st, 2014

Everyone is a Leader is the hardest Outside-In® value to live and the most important value for us to get right! Culture is our secret sauce and our choke point. Our culture is “free.” Anyone can see it, read about it, experience it, and copy it. Then why is it so hard to mimic? Ego, success, habits, what exists, to name just a few. Giving everyone a chance to be a leader when there are so few good ones? Well, that just might be the point after all. Would you rather have one, or two, or many? I think getting all to embrace and understand the essence of leadership gives us a real marketplace advantage.

ID-100260051Imagine an organization and the advantage it could possess if its workforce dedicated itself to learning about leadership? Would growth be more manageable as key openings were easier to fill? Especially if you can fill these roles from within?

Living a value and being a great leader are obviously different. For our companies we want and expect:

  • All to have a say, especially in customer matters
  • All to learn how to make effective decisions
  • All to learn how to develop leadership capabilities
  • All to practice leadership skills

Leadership Mastery is a 10,000 hour pursuit. Thats 3 hours a day for a really long time—over ten years! Living the value of Everyone is a Leader frankly takes just as much organizational energy. But like I said if we do it well it is a free advantage that is extremely difficult to copy!

Customer Service: Nth Degree Mindset

December 17th, 2014

There is so much talk about customer service yet so little of it sticks. Every business, every leader, every single one of us, has good intentions. None of us go to work saying, “Today I am going to plan to disappoint a customer when I interact with them. Let’s hang up on them. Avoid them. Get their order wrong. Misinterpret them. Let’s just be average and kind of ‘blah.’ That is where most of us end up really. In the Valley of Blah, we don’t quite fail or flob, however, we are far from memorable. Being memorable requires you to understand those critical “Moments of Truth.”

ServiceNMoments of Truth are those customer points of intersection. A great culture helps. At the Outside-In® Companies, we have a value “Service to the Nth Degree” and our goal is to go above and beyond expectations. We provide service without boundaries, limits, or governor. Just push service as far as you can. A good culture helps an employee trust that they can serve without barriers. The company system supports and rewards those customer service behaviors! Have you ever had an experience where a cashier or customer service representative indicates that they need manager approval and the manager never comes or arrives in what seems like an unacceptable time frame? All of this for a simple product return or change in your purchase! That’s a poor business system at it’s best.

We think empowering employees to think to the Nth Degree is just part of the answer to providing an Outside-In® experience. This enables us to create Nth Degree moments that are spontaneous and authentic.

However, the real magic in creating Moments of Truth is to think about those key moments of interaction with your customer. How can you save them time? Speed up the process? Enhance the experience? How can you make that moment memorable and ensure every customer experiences that Moment of Truth? Our goal is to make Outside-In® and Nth Degree a repeatable thing. Full of great in the moment Moments of Truth and planned Moments of Truth.

The sky’s the limit to Nth Degree service thinking. The key is to take each part of your business and brainstorm how to be more Nth Degree. One of the ways we practice our Nth Degree value as a team is to partake in charity work for our community. We have a charity of the month program where each month we fundraise and donate our time and services to a charity in need.

Try and pilot it. Measure it. Operationalize. Then repeat!

Here’s to Nth Degree moments!

3rd Annual Holiday Infographic

December 9th, 2014

Happy Holidays from the Outside-In® Companies!

We looked back on our year through mint, gold & rose colored glasses. Take a look at our year in numbers through our 3rd Annual Holiday Infographic!

 

Happy Thanksgiving from Outside-In® Companies!

November 26th, 2014

Each year, the Outside-In® team likes to express our gratitude in a fun and unique way. This year we asked our team members what they are most thankful for and had them write it all down on a piece of paper to create an appreciation wall. View our video below to see what we are most thankful for!

Wishing all of our customers a safe & happy holiday!

Archives

Outside-In® Book List

© Year CBI Group. All Rights Reserved. Site Credits.