Category: Outside-In®


15 things I learned over 15 years! Advice I might give my 32 year old self.

July 27th, 2016

Who ever thinks about where they will be 15 years from now? Who really thinks about tomorrow? At 32, I put it all on the line and became the fourth generation in my family to take the entrepreneurial plunge – starting my first company, CBI Group.

I was asked to share a little bit about what I have learned over the last 15 years of running my own business, CBI Group and the Outside-In® Companies. Perhaps I can pass on some wisdom you might find useful, or a musing that you find entertaining? For me this is pretty darn cathartic! Write it down. Get it out. And keep pressing play and come back at it again tomorrow, right? That is what most entrepreneurs do best. As Churchill said, “Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever give up.” These are my words to live by through thick and thin.

As I think back I get emotional. I have had servers stolen, office roofs collapse, 9/11 on my first day. I have had floods and fires on Super Bowl Sunday! Through all the good, bad and disaster, here goes 15 thoughts from reflecting on 15 years in business.

  1. Most business are not pink unicorn businesses. Few entrepreneurs have million dollar business ideas, let alone billion dollar ones. So think about it as you sip your Starbucks, while shopping using your Amazon Prime account to compare rates with Walmart. To be the next Facebook, you have to have a scalable idea, a really great brand promise that is very defendable, and be a very skilled leader/founder that knows how to scale. Most of us mere business mortals build our businesses and keep them for a long time. Progress, profit, growth, real break through impact and change come slowly! And not all businesses will sell, merge or be acquired. Day after day we run our companies.
  2. What is success, anyway? The funny thing about success is that it looks easy. And is often viewed that way with envy and jealousy. However, show me an overnight success and I guarantee you it is the exception to the rule. Success is a judgement, anyway. Success comes with hard work, luck, perseverance, and fortitude that few can stomach. I am at year 15. Success is all relative.
  3. The stages of growth are challenging. If you’re lucky to navigate the growth stages, to learn from them, and frankly survive your inevitable inability to adapt and change fast enough, you have learned this too. As leaders we must change our approach/style/focus and even our goals for each phase of growth. And no one tells you this when you start! I started this business with a flip cell phone, an 89 page business plan, and a card table desk in a friend’s office break room. (Thank you, Jim!) We grew, added staff and then one day nothing worked. We adjusted and changed and then we hit another growth wall. Years later, I am now better informed on what goes into next growth stage and the challenges that we will face as a company, and that I will face as a leader. The lucky ones get a chance to learn from their mistakes and live to fight another day. Some great insight on each phase of growth can be found at here.
  4. Just how often can I change my style and role, anyway? Day 1 I did everything… Sales, marketing, customer service, hiring, billing, taking out the trash, you name it. Where did all of these employees come from anyway? 15 years, three brands, thousands of employees and customers later… think of all those budgets, strategic plans, and years of promise and change? Today, I spend my days teaching and coaching leaders and employees in through making tough decisions for their business. Our values guide me in my work and help others to forge their own path and make their own decisions. Some days, I still sell, market, answer the phone, and take out the trash. BUT, I come back resolutely to our strategy. Where we are going? And why? And then I align everyone to the plan and to the current operational plans for the business this quarter. And my role will continue to involve — what will year 20 look like?
  5. Hiring more people is an entrepreneurial answer to just about everything. We get excited about growth and enjoy opening more offices, generating more sales and of course increasing headcount. BUT, I’ve learned what you really need to do is to solve problems with better scalable systems and technologies! That is where value and scaling can come into play.
  6. Define your why. Coming to work without a real purpose or perhaps to just make money is a hollow place to be. Customers, employees, and vendor/partners get excited when your business exists to serve the greater good. Why do you get out of bed? Defining that in your business attracts folks to your business and keeps them coming back.
  7. Go find someone who has solved the problem before. If you know me as stubborn, you would not be the only one. My biggest learn over the last five years is all around this point. For years I solved the problem with what I had, my way of thinking and my team. Instead? Go get the answer, find folks that have solved it before. Gather perspective. Then make your path forward with that information. So much time, energy, resources and money have been wasted on starting from scratch! This is a problem when you have a culture that prides itself on innovation and creativity. I’ve learned that simple is often more elegant.
  8. Not everyone is going on the ride with you. Or at least the whole ride. My dad, Alan Burkhard told me once, “Not even your mother made all 27 years with me in the business.” Life changes. Business needs change. Folks do different things, they move, change careers, get married and start businesses. Or they disagree with your thinking and business direction… and they leave you. Get used it! However, treat them like they will be with you forever. I had less then 2% turnover in core staff the first 7 years. Man, I used to brag about it. Then we changed business models and great legacy folks left me. My heart was broken at the time. No one goes on the ride with you the entire trip. Get used to it. I have.
  9. Make it really hard to get in your business. But easy to leave. This is a borrowed family mantra. But it works really well. In other words, hire slowly. But throw folks a party when they leave. Loyalty and allegiance are good things. Unless that is all that is left. And it happens. Staff and the jobs they are in do not remain a good fit for long. We are really lucky if your current duties align with your interest more then a few times a year. Work is cyclical and project based. Most businesses change everything fast. Try and stay aligned to the purpose. Try to keep your quarterly goals relevant as the business changes month to month. Do your quarterly or six month goals seem outdated when you go to review them? Welcome to the pace of change today. Agile employees, agile rolling forecasts, agile performance reviews or feedback sessions. Everything must be portable, flexible and easy to move. Including you.
  10. Be way more conservative and realistic. I have suffered from and am often overly optimistic. I am reformed at this point. But at 32, I could sell, I could talk fast,  and I could and did try to outwork others. So most of the time, I was lucky enough to outwork my optimism. But the truth is I have had to be much more honest around planning scenarios. Today, work cast scenario planning really matters to me. And I prefer realistic  and conservative thinking today. And it is hard this way. Running a business can be more fun when your a gambler who goes for it all of the time. No rules in the early years of the business is fun for others right? Until you fail big time. And I have. So, today I balance long-range strategy thinking (and dreaming) with a dose of reality.
  11. Have you really mastered being a leader? I hear it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master anything. Humbly, I am triple that in real world practice as a leader. And I still have so much to learn.
  12. I wish I did not wait so long to be direct. Tell the truth. Let folks know where they stand. Give them feedback. We all crave it. Stop hinting someone to death. Love them up or out. Your team deserves to be successful, challenged, and to be the best they can be for you. Or move folks on to their next successful place. That is a leader’s job – or at least one that cares about their people.
  13. Running a business is cyclical. Economic swings, job markets and times/politics change. I always felt I was too small a business to worry about how much market share I had. BUT, I wish I had learned earlier on that the market changes. And how I run the business needs to change with it. There are times to go for it, and times to be very conservative and play things tight to the vest.
  14. I had no idea I could be this patient. If I had to give my younger 32 year old self some advice it would be, “This is going to take a while. You’re going to need to sacrifice everything. Put it all on the line, everything, your house, your marriage, your key relationships… Younger self, are you ready for all of this? Time, patience, fortitude, moxie, perseverance. At times you go numb. At times you come to the office but take the day off mentally. But most days the world will not let you. Entrepreneurs need to be relevant and focused almost every day to make it. And that says nothing about success or making it big time!”
  15. Everything changes. Good days fade. Bad days take longer to go away. Business is terrific. Then change happens. Some years you grow and don’t make money. And in flat years you’re running a better company and the bottom line is sweet! Change keeps coming. Employees come and go. Customers are bought and sold, go bankrupt and move out of town. Customers’ needs and wants change. Multi-million dollar business lines dry up. New products grow up before your eyes and become your big bell winner, your future. Rookies become managers. Managers become senior leaders. I have learned that being a student of change is my one true advantage. Embrace it, drive it, and know status quo is deadly in the long run!

So my 32 year old self was full of himself. Glib and confident. Boundless and endless energy on reserve. Every problem in the business was one I created. I celebrated those early fiascos, they were fun to try and resolve. Everything was about the vision for what I wanted to build with that early team. We were going to reinvent and create a space in staffing and professional services. We vowed to make culture important (believe it or not when those words were foreign in most business’s large and small). I worked endlessly. For two years straight I worked every single day. My theory was an hour worked today is an hour I would get back when I exited the business. The exit plan was scheduled for year nine! Well, six years later I am still at it. Today it’s much more about the journey than the destination.

p.s. if you’re interested, here are my 10 musings from our 10th anniversary in 2011!

Please Stop Writing about Millennials in the Workplace

June 15th, 2016

Millennials chatterIn five years, a majority of workers will be Millennials. Boomers are retiring or being replaced at a rapid pace of 10-13,000 per day! Everyone talks about how Millennials are going to change work for the rest of us. They have. But the change started long before they came on the scene in large numbers. The only point that matters is that many of us want to work differently. And have been working on it since Millennials were born.

Smart businesses have realized that most of us don’t work for a paycheck. We work for a purpose. Which is why so many of us care about working some place that has a mission!

They say Millennials only care about their growth and new skills. Haven’t we all grown tired of video games and smoothies at work? Food and tchotchkes barely, if ever, really mattered that much compared to how much I liked my job. But, chances to have new experiences? Lead new projects. Learn new technologies. That is what real talent has always wanted.

Nobody can lead like a 5 star general anymore. Command and Control is dead. Communication and ideas must flow freely. And decision making is distributed and pushed out to the front lines, putting decision makers much closer to the customer. This is not new, this is 20 years in the making kind of stuff. Millennials (and the rest of us) want leaders that can coach too and value our whole selves. So please, stop writing and talking about Millennials in the workplace. We get it, there’s a lot of them.

What is the purpose of a recruitment strategy?

May 25th, 2016

what-is-the-purpose-of-recruitment-strategyWhat is the purpose of a recruitment strategy? What is the point of any strategy? A strategy defines the big and important questions. Who, what, when, and why. Who is doing what by when? And why are they doing it? Your recruiting strategy hopefully creates an efficient use of company resources to provide the best talent your business needs to get the job done. Your strategy may even create a productive advantage in your marketplace!

So what’s the purpose? A recruitment strategy creates proactivity and clarity of purpose in your process of attracting and selecting talent for your business and aligns talent acquisition goals to the business goals.

A recruitment strategy starts with clearly understanding your company’s values in order to best define and understand the employee behaviors you want to attract. A recruitment strategy also clearly articulates a company’s purpose or vision for the future. A well executed recruitment strategy will also align employees to the specific behaviors that are encouraged in the company.

A recruitment strategy has the distinct purpose of deciding how talent will be identified and attracted to the business, how the employer brand will be marketed to talent and ultimately how candidates will be evaluated for employment.

Attracting talent relies on your recruiting brand. How will you position and describe your company and its brand in an authentic way? Where will you promote your company? This is where good job descriptions, score cards, job postings, recruitment technology, and recruitment partners come into play. Today, no one can be the best at their entire strategy.

Evaluation of talent is also a huge part of your recruitment strategy. Do you want your managers to talk with recruits about how they got into the business and oversell why you company is great? Or will you define the questions and role of your managers as you create hiring teams? Always define the team roles in evaluating talent. Set evaluation processes and standards to ensure talent is attracted and evaluated in a consistent way!

A recruitment strategy defines the following:

  • A solution to meet a business challenge: for example, need to hire 1500 employees to open a new plant in New York, or need to hire 75 sales people to expand into new regional territories
  • How you will find and attract talent
  • Your hiring process and how you will evaluate talent
  • How you will leverage the company business plan to highlight your employer brand promise. (Why us versus competitor!)
  • Budget for recruitment
  • Resource allocation – both internally and with partners who will help carry out strategy

Need help defining or have a gap in your recruiting strategy?

Recruitment-Assessment

Why Managers are Failing to Hire – It’s not always HR’s Fault

May 4th, 2016

Often, managers keep C talent in roles too long. Here’s why networking can help.

First, it’s important to understand what today’s economy and labor market look like:

  1. There are a lot of job openings.
  2. Unemployment is low.
  3. 1 in 3 workers that is happy, however, they intend to change jobs.

Yes, we are now in a market where happy workers are moving around and ready for their next challenge!

In a candidate’s market, what do managers do about hiring for their team/department/division? I know what they do. Complain to Human Resources and to their boss that they are not seeing enough talent for their openings. I hear this everyday from customers. And we tell them the same thing every time. Failing managers count on others to find talent for their organizations. And then blame HR or Talent Acquisition teams.  

This is why failing managers keep average or below average talent. In survey after survey, managers admit they keep sub par talent because they have no one else to do the job. Which is another way of saying that they don’t intend to do that job either. They are simply happy with the notion that someone is doing the work. But the failing employees are not happy! The employees are missing time, or making mistakes, and causing havoc with the rest of the team. Aren’t leaders responsible for budgets, productivity and results? Of course.

how-to-hire-a-players-coverSo why not network to go from being an average or failing leader to one who networks and fills their own jobs? This is what I call keeping your sofa full. (Check out chapter 7 in How to Hire A Players by Eric Herrenkohl.)

Failing (C players) managers blame others and do nothing.

Winning Leaders (A players) get out out to meet talent at trade shows, industry events, chamber meetings, or at civic and social clubs. Leaders get out to build their network. To meet people. To offer help and create value. But they are always working on building their bench and know who their next hire is going to be!

Which type of leader are you?

Why Networking Pays Off for the Best Candidates

April 14th, 2016

In thinking about what sets the best candidates apart from the average ones, here’s why networking pays off for the best candidates, but doesn’t work for the average ones.

The best candidates understand that networking is not an event. Instead, it’s something you do with regularity, like the slow and steady drip of the coffee pot each and every morning. Networking is not what you do when you’re unemployed and looking for your next gig. Or something you do when you’re in sales and your need to reach your monthly sales quota… The world we sees you coming, you need something, right? Well, you’re the last person the room wants to meet.

best-candidates-networkThe best candidates can network because they do it consistently in their company, in their industry and in their local marketplace. They know networking helps address many professional needs at one time. That networking allows you to learn from others. And is a way to meet people (and for people can meet you). Yes,  relational capital. Check out Ed Wallace, The Relational Ladder for more good stuff on that!

The best candidates build relationships with the people they meet, which leads to opportunities to help/serve/do something for others. It is in this act of service that the best candidates distinguish themselves. When you know someone, you can build trust, respect and even like them. And the best candidates learn to accumulate these relationships and develop a network of connections that have been cultivated to develop mutual benefit and gain.  The more a good candidate networks and serves, the more the they can count on their network to reciprocate.

To be the best candidate, practice these simple steps:

  • Network like clock work (harder than it sounds).
  • Serve the needs of others.
  • Practice the “accumulation and time effects” — network a little all of the time forever.
  • Do more for your network than you ask of it.
  • Live by a mantra of trust, credibility and value creation:
    • Be trustworthy— make your word mean something with impeccable follow through.
    • Have credibility— Give back to your network with what you know and who you know.
    • Ask yourself, am I creating value for people in my network?

So yes, the best candidates are great at networking.  And they are in demand because of it.  These candidates can land any coffee meet up or job they want in their network. How do I know? Think of the best candidates, they usually fit this mold!

Is “No Silos’ an achievable goal?

February 10th, 2016

Silo Mentality‘ is “an attitude found in some organizations that occurs when several departments or groups do not want to share information or knowledge with other individuals in the same company.” (Investopedia)

The key phrase I’d like to point out in the above definition is “do not want to share.” Why? I’ll get to that, but first let me set up where I am coming from.

No Silos is one of our Outside-In® values. We like to brag about being one team where politics, title and departments do not create barriers to doing business for us. With multiple brands, teams and functions this value symbolically declares our equality — regardless of title or role — to everyone internally and externally in the business.

Silo MentalityBut I am here to say that we have silos, and probably always will. There are a few sources of silos that are unavoidable. For one, it is only natural for people to imprint strongly or bond with a team, a client, or group of people (when you start in the same orientation class, for example). Folks are always going to find some commonality to silo around. Everyone looks to self identify — where we live, who we know, what we know and of course who we work with or share information with. We tend to discriminate or create silos when we don’t know others. It is easier to not help or not share when you are strangers. So with strong relationship bonds, silos are naturally created.

Another example of unavoidable silos in business are organizational functions. The operations, finance, HR and sales teams (and so on) are by nature separate functions that create silos for a number of reasons: knowledge/expertise, common projects & goals, shared leadership, or even the fact that people sit closer together. Work is organized in such a way that you spend a lot of time together working on similar work, and therefore barriers are created between one functional group and another.

So yes, companies and organizations will always have silos. There will always be groups of friends, project groups, account teams, functional departments and leadership at every company. Let’s go back to the phrase “do not want to share” in the definition of silo mentality. There is one thing that separates a company with silo mentality and one without: it’s the willingness to share information.

If you sense a Silo Mentality at your company, dig deeper into the why. 1. Are people unwilling to share information with other teams? 2. Are there rules from leadership that prevent information sharing? Or 3. Is it the organizational structure that makes it hard (but not impossible) to work across teams and departments?

At Outside-In® Companies, we have experienced a lot of organizational change lately as we get organized for growth and scaling. As we define roles and put infrastructure in place, we are experiencing some of #3. But what I can tell you, is that our issues with silos are not as severe as the stories I hear about from companies that experience #1 and #2. How about needing to fill out an actual form that must be approved by each department head to receive permission to talk to another department? So much for collaboration at the water cooler or getting together for happy hour to create, solve or address business problems, large or small.

Or this recent one. Sales and Account Management teams refused to include the Service team in the customer conversation. These departments misconstrued who owns relationships, and maybe most importantly who is involved with delivering an experience to the customer! Imagine trying to get anything done!

So yes, at the Outside-In® Companies, we do have Silos. But our Silo Mentality is not because we are unwilling to share with our team members or because we have rules in place that prevent cross-team collaboration. In fact, with No Silos as a value, cross-team collaboration is encouraged. The No Silos value is about building relationships because you can. And encourages reaching out across silos — without rules, forms, sign up sheets or leader’s permission. Regardless of a one leader’s behavior, one can always talk to or work with whom they want.

Now, back to the question at hand, “Is ‘No Silos’ an achievable goal?” No Silos is an aspirational value. It’s impossible to have No Silos in a business. But you can reinforce a ‘No Silos Mentality’ and adjust your organizational structure to break down barriers that prevent departments or teams from working well together. The mentality or mindset is achievable, and one we always strive to improve upon.

Does your company have a Silos Mentality? If so, you have a leadership problem. Yup, I said it. Silos exist because leaders allow it, can’t address it, or are rewarded or incentivized to allow them to exist. So dig deeper to find out the why.

What is Outside-In?

February 4th, 2016

Although Outside-In® is a regular topic in my blog, the definition tends to elude some readers. By definition, Outside-In® is when a business is customer-centered. It is a philosophy, a culture, a way of thinking that impacts the way a business and its employees operate. When you’re Outside-In®, you are always listening to your customers’ needs and wants for opportunities to improve, drive change, or try something new for your customers.

I know many leaders that pride themselves on focusing on the customer exclusively — kudos to them. But how many leaders truly turn outward first, then build a company that does the same? A leader’s focus on the customer does not necessarily translate into every employee. Outside-In® suggests that leaders don’t have to hold the customer’s wants and needs on their shoulders alone. In a world that is moving faster every day, isn’t it better to have everyone in the organization listening and reacting to customers, instead of just one or a few?

Outside-In® companies should and can run like one, big, constant focus group. Imagine a focus group that never ends, where employees get to ask the questions and observe the customers’ behavior. What if these observations were collected and cherished every day and that company decisions and plans were driven based on all the customer insights collected? In an eternal focus group, every employee sees the impact the company has on the customer and when that impact is negative or unproductive, each employee has the opportunity to recognize how the issue could be addressed.

Employee IdeasLast year, Comcast NBCUniversal awarded employee ideas in the company’s internal ‘Shark Tank’ competition, The Idea, which challenged employees (139,000+ globally) to come up with the next big idea to make the company better. Employees responded to challenge, submitting 200 submissions within two hours of the program’s announcement, and nearly 3,000 ideas in the end. All employees’ suggestions “for enhancing the customer experience or driving innovation and new business opportunities.” Maggie Suniewick, a Senior VP for the company and organizer of the competition shared, “We have so many talented and engaged employees with really good ideas — they just haven’t always known how to share them more broadly.” The Idea winner, Nathan Kalish agreed with executives inspiration behind the competition, “We have to look to employees and consumers to identify needs and challenges,” he says. “And if we want to adapt and grow, we need to respond.”

Google is another example of a company that not only rewards employees but also their customers who uncover vulnerabilities in Google’s system. Last year, Google rewarded Kamil Hismatullin who discovered that he could delete any YouTube video file in minutes. Instead of exploiting this information, he reported the code he used to Google, who fixed the issue within a few hours and gave him $5,000 as a thank you. And just this week it was reported how much Google paid the man who bought the Google.com domain back in October 2015. What would Google do if they no longer had Google.com?!

There are lots of companies that practice the Outside-In® behavior of listening to customers to fix problems, make improvements and implement new ideas. And you don’t need to be a big company with a huge bank account like NBCUniversal or Google. Harvard Business Review notes one Japanese company Idemitsu, which gets more than a hundred ideas per employee each year without offering any bonuses. Imagine your company living with a customer-centric mindset 24/7! Wow, think of the money you could save. Or how much your company could make with new ideas?

How to Earn the Right with Outside-In

January 13th, 2016

I have a problem with the way you conduct yourself.

Earn the RightYes, that’s right I do. You have called me repeatedly and asked for my time. I have emails from you, many I might say. I even got the snail mail brochure that is sitting on my desk under a pile of other papers. You have done a terrific job of making you and your firm known to me. However, not in a good way. I am a small business person. Without relationships, customers, even new prospects to talk to, I do not have a company to run. So, I feel uniquely qualified to comment on this subject. I am, what I am going to call an “earning the right expert”. What is earning the right you might say? I hope you ask me that question or better yet read this post before you call and email for the 7th time on Tuesday at 1:30 pm. Yes, I even know when you are going to call me. And I make plans to avoid your call.

Earning the right is a core value of the Outside-In® Companies. Admittedly, I think we can do better at this one. Earning the right is what we must do for all of our relationships both internally and externally in our business.

  • Earning the right is about how we build trust.
  • Earning the right is how we make and keep small commitments.
  • Earning the right is how we demonstrate and create value for people.
  • Earning the right is about doing something for others because you have made an effort to find out what is important to them. And once you know that, deciding if your sphere of influence can help them out.
  • Earning the right is the first step to becoming something more in a relationship.

Need an example? Try asking me what my problems are. Or consider investing in me personally. Everyone always has a car to buy, has a kid graduating, a neighbor who needs a vendor or vendor who needs a problem solved. Help me help you. Be authentic. Be Genuine. Invest in me first.

Your calls, emails, and letters will be left where they are until you ask me to share my story. And you actually listen to it. Yes, I probably need what your selling. I might even be actively looking for your product or services right now. I could make your month or your quarterly bonus. But don’t sell me your product or your company. Tell me your story. But ask me about mine. Earn the right first.

ps: By the way earning the right fits in every single relationship situation. This is about slowing down. Doing things right. Don’t be selfish. Or at least fake it a little, please. Folks that don’t practice earning the right sound like whiny teenagers demanding the car keys on a Saturday night! Earn the right in all your relationships.

New Year Leadership Planning Tips

January 6th, 2016

Outside-In® Chronicles: a throwback post, originally published five years ago in January 2010

2016 Leadership PlanningLeaders often ask me about how they can be a better leader tomorrow. What can they do right now to have impact on their business. I find the key is to know how to plan and approach leadership actions creatively. Still not sure what I mean? Leaders do stuff — they are in meetings, they make and take phone calls, they solve problems, etc. As a leader you could spend all day reacting to the world around you. In fact, it never stops coming. All day long the cell phone rings and the inbox fills up. Yet this is not leadership. And it’s certainly not planned, thoughtful leadership. Leadership planning is a way to have a real impact. To be proactive and creative in improving the lives of your employees and the productivity they can achieve.

No matter what industry you are in, you will inevitably have customers, employees, vendors and prospects in your day. The best way to plan? Let’s start by thinking about any employee. What do they need right now? A compliment?  Recognition? A tough talk? Someone to listen? Training? Your job is to eliminate barriers for your employees while holding them accountable, to remind people that they have something to learn, let them know you’re there to help and that you care.

Still not so sure what to do? Think about your customers next. Who can use a proactive call from you. Have you pulled the team together just to talk about a customer when there is not a problem? This is where the real opportunity lies.

  1. Leadership planning is scheduled time.
  2. Leadership planning involves critical thinking.
  3. Leadership planning can be exciting and creative if you know how.
  4. Leadership planning is a basic skill that can change your world. And your employees.

Do this homework assignment on a Sunday night.

  1. Take out a note pad. Right out your top to do’s for the week/Monday.
  2. Analyze the list. How much is recurring or just work to do?
  3. Make a list for an employee or special project.
  4. Think about them. What do they need from you to be more successful?
  5. Make plans.

Remember we all can get better, all of the time. And we will if our leaders can impact us in a meaningful way.

Need help to have real impact or want to share your ideas with others? Would love to hear more from you; we all have something to learn!

4th Annual Holiday Infographic

December 10th, 2015

Happy Holidays from the Outside-In® Companies!

Take a look at our year in numbers through our 4th Annual Holiday Infographic!

Outside-In® Book List

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