Category: Recruitment Process


How Social Media Can Impact Your Recruiting Strategies

January 15th, 2017

Acquiring the right talent for any position can be challenging. Often, finding that one person who fits the role just right is critical to the success of a project or position within the company. Fortunately, today there are many avenues for researching and recruiting the qualified candidates. In the ever-changing world of social media, new recruiting strategies are surfacing. If you are not currently utilizing social media as a tool for talent acquisition, it is time consider a shift in your position because whether you like it or not, the odds are good that social media will have an impact on your ability to acquire the right talent before someone else does.

The Power of the Big Three in Social Media

LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter are still going strong as social media powerhouses and can be used to your advantage when searching for talent and creating a strong brand image for your company. If you are not currently using these, you may be missing out on numerous talent acquisition opportunities. LinkedIn provides access to a large group of professionals and networking opportunities. Its matching algorithms will even provide suggestions for potential employees based on your activity on the site.

While LinkedIn is the most popular for recruiters, Facebook is still the largest social network on the planet. With the volume of people who use Facebook and its powerful built-in search engine, called the Graph Search, you can source candidates who have a specific educational background, work experience, post content that you find of value to the position, and even uncover candidates who work for competing companies.

Twitter is the most underutilized of the big three. If you can take advantage of this powerful tool for talent acquisition, then you are ahead of the game. First, over half of all job seekers use Twitter for researching company profiles, so it is crucial that your company is well represented. While many job-seekers are interested in applying for tweeted employment opportunities, not many companies consistently tweet these openings. If you are not currently utilizing Twitter, it is time to start.

Social Media Platforms Can Propel You Ahead of the Competition

Not only are the endless opportunities to explore and discover candidates through the big three, there are many other less common platforms that should also be considered in recruitment strategies. Some may be specifically geared to certain types of candidates or skills. By learning and utilizing these, you may discover many opportunities that others have not yet explored, giving your company an advantage over most.

Do you need help navigating the world of social media for talent acquisition? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450.

How to Write Job Descriptions That Will Identify the Right Candidate

December 28th, 2016

When responsible for managing staff, one of the most important tasks is hiring new employees or contract talent. Choosing the wrong person can have negative consequences. In turn, if your job description does not accurately describe the job requirements, you may not attract the right person for the job, or high quality talent. So what is important in a job description for today’s best candidates?

Convey Your Company’s Culture

Laptop vector illustration. Flat design. Notebook with text on screen. Working with documents on computer  illustration for writing, coding concept, app icon, logo design. Isolated on white background.

Company culture is very important when it comes to interviewing and recruiting a potential employee. Your want to attract candidates that will be a good fit for the company and will enjoy coming to the office every day. You may think that you have found the perfect candidate based on their education, experience and skills, yet, if this person is not a culture fit, he or she may not be productive or perform to their full potential. Communicate the corporate mission, work-life balance and other important aspects of the company culture in your job description. If you offer remote work opportunities, flexible schedules or an on-site gym, include each on the job description, it can make a difference between competing opportunities.

Make it Interesting

Candidates spend significant time looking at job descriptions and hopefully tailoring their resume to that description. Many candidates will simply move on to the next employment listing if they are reading a boring job description. Make your job listing stand out by being creative. Use a unique font or text color. If you can, add a short video to the job description. The video could talk about the positive aspects of the role along with some perks of the company.  It could also feature employee testimonials talking about why they love working for the company and where the company is headed in the future.

Focus on What Is Most Important

A job description should be short and simple. Do not drive away potential candidates by listing every single desirable qualification. The ideal candidate may not have every skill that on your list. Language that is exclusionary may cause the perfect candidate to not bother applying for the position. So, choose what skills are most important and list them in the job description. Stick to about five or six key qualifications. The same goes with job duties. Do not list every duty associated with the job. It does not provide insight into what tasks are the most important and can drive potential candidates away. Instead, choose five or six of the most important responsibilities for the position.

Do you need help writing job descriptions or identifying talent for hard to fill roles? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450!

Why Having a Booth at a Job Fair is a Great Way to Recruit New Talent

August 17th, 2016

When it comes to recruiting new talent for your businessTalent Strategy Job Fair, you have multiple options to choose from. You have agencies with a database of talent that they can introduce to you and you even have job boards where prospective employees search and apply for jobs. However, another excellent method of recruiting new talent that you can use as a supplement to your recruiting strategy is through a booth at a job fair. Hosting a booth at a job fair can be an invaluable part of an overall recruitment strategy for your company.

Having a booth or desk at a job fair can have multiple benefits that can serve as a big boost to your overall recruiting endeavors. You will get to meet and interview each and every candidate that approaches your booth out of their curiosity about your company. You will have a chance to determine whether this job seeker is a presentable, well-spoken person who will get along well with your other employees.

Using a job fair as a recruitment strategy can especially be beneficial to companies that are looking for employees who have “soft skills” such as sales, communication, and management. Within a few minutes, you’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be confident, determined, and well-spoken enough to survive in the competitive and volatile world of outside or inside sales. You’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be commanding enough and has enough control over his/her emotions to be able to manage a team of employees every day.

You can save a lot of time and money by only calling back employees who made a good first impression and who meet the criteria you’re looking for on the resume they handed to you at the job fair.

Some employers believe they can do some sort of video conferencing interview to quickly screen candidates instead of participating in a job fair, but you may not have a chance to see as much as you could when you meet a candidate face-to-face. Through video, you may not be able to determine how a person carries himself, what his/her body language is really like, and whether he has a strong presence. All of these factors are definitely important particularly when candidates are seeking jobs where they have to deal with clients on a regular basis.

We highly recommend that you take advantage of the opportunity to host a booth or desk at a job fair. As we mentioned, this gives you the chance to really see job candidates as a whole. How can you find them? Let’s list some ways:

  • Online directories
  • Contact colleges campus officials
  • Find big outdoor events

We have one final tip: pay close attention to what a candidate asks you when one approaches your booth. This will shed light on his/her level of interest as well as his/her intentions.

How to Recruit Passive Candidates

June 22nd, 2016

magnet attracting passive candidatesSometimes recruiting can be pretty straight forward. You have an open job, you post it online, and a significant pool of talented individuals apply for the job, eagerly expressing their interest. You interview, negotiate offers and fill the position. But often, when the job opening requires unique talent, passive talent will be the target. Active candidates don’t fulfill the requirements and you need to reach the candidates that aren’t searching for jobs, haven’t expressed any interest in your requisition, and are generally happy with their current role.

Recruiting these passive candidates requires a strategic approach to generate interest. Passive candidates usually don’t have a resume online, and certainly aren’t regularly applying to jobs. Identifying and recruiting passive candidates should be focused on marketing the opportunity to each individual. Think about why his or her background translates well into the role, and tailor your message appropriately.

The goal is to engage and build relationships with pools of highly skilled candidates. It’s important to position yourself as an expert in the industry market and develop your network. Again, marketing or selling the job and company is crucial. Put yourself in their shoes. What’s it like to receive an unexpected message, call, or an invitation to connect on social media? Are you making that unexpected conversation worth their while? Remember, in the passive candidate market, the recruiter needs the candidate, not the other way around.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

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What is the purpose of a recruitment strategy?

May 25th, 2016

what-is-the-purpose-of-recruitment-strategyWhat is the purpose of a recruitment strategy? What is the point of any strategy? A strategy defines the big and important questions. Who, what, when, and why. Who is doing what by when? And why are they doing it? Your recruiting strategy hopefully creates an efficient use of company resources to provide the best talent your business needs to get the job done. Your strategy may even create a productive advantage in your marketplace!

So what’s the purpose? A recruitment strategy creates proactivity and clarity of purpose in your process of attracting and selecting talent for your business and aligns talent acquisition goals to the business goals.

A recruitment strategy starts with clearly understanding your company’s values in order to best define and understand the employee behaviors you want to attract. A recruitment strategy also clearly articulates a company’s purpose or vision for the future. A well executed recruitment strategy will also align employees to the specific behaviors that are encouraged in the company.

A recruitment strategy has the distinct purpose of deciding how talent will be identified and attracted to the business, how the employer brand will be marketed to talent and ultimately how candidates will be evaluated for employment.

Attracting talent relies on your recruiting brand. How will you position and describe your company and its brand in an authentic way? Where will you promote your company? This is where good job descriptions, score cards, job postings, recruitment technology, and recruitment partners come into play. Today, no one can be the best at their entire strategy.

Evaluation of talent is also a huge part of your recruitment strategy. Do you want your managers to talk with recruits about how they got into the business and oversell why you company is great? Or will you define the questions and role of your managers as you create hiring teams? Always define the team roles in evaluating talent. Set evaluation processes and standards to ensure talent is attracted and evaluated in a consistent way!

A recruitment strategy defines the following:

  • A solution to meet a business challenge: for example, need to hire 1500 employees to open a new plant in New York, or need to hire 75 sales people to expand into new regional territories
  • How you will find and attract talent
  • Your hiring process and how you will evaluate talent
  • How you will leverage the company business plan to highlight your employer brand promise. (Why us versus competitor!)
  • Budget for recruitment
  • Resource allocation – both internally and with partners who will help carry out strategy

Need help defining or have a gap in your recruiting strategy?

Recruitment-Assessment

How is talent sourcing different from recruiting?

May 13th, 2016

recruiter-vs-sourcing-specialistRecruiting in the traditional sense includes at the very least some talent sourcing. Both sourcing and recruiting are often intertwined skills and responsibilities. But more recently, Talent Acquisition strategy is trending toward a more specialized approach, separating talent sourcing and recruiting roles. So what’s the difference between sourcing and recruiting, anyway?

Typically, recruiting includes reworking job descriptions, choosing candidates from a pipeline, leading the interview process, and managing offers and on-boarding. Specifically, recruiting does not often include the proactive identification of candidates outside of the talent pipeline. That pipeline is the product of excellent talent sourcing.

Successful talent sourcing requires a thoughtful and detailed strategy. Identifying, engaging, generating interest, and ultimately building a pipeline of candidates can either make or break the talent acquisition process. Therefore, sourcing talent has become a specialized skill set, requiring in-depth knowledge of techniques, tools, and channels that differ from the skill set and strengths of a recruiter.

Of course, Talent Acquisition thrives on the consistency and collaboration of both talent sourcing and recruiting. Consequently, there is a emphasis on information sharing and teamwork for either to be deemed successful. Don’t be afraid to think about your recruiting process critically — you just may identify a weakness that could be easily corrected.

Why Managers are Failing to Hire – It’s not always HR’s Fault

May 4th, 2016

Often, managers keep C talent in roles too long. Here’s why networking can help.

First, it’s important to understand what today’s economy and labor market look like:

  1. There are a lot of job openings.
  2. Unemployment is low.
  3. 1 in 3 workers that is happy, however, they intend to change jobs.

Yes, we are now in a market where happy workers are moving around and ready for their next challenge!

In a candidate’s market, what do managers do about hiring for their team/department/division? I know what they do. Complain to Human Resources and to their boss that they are not seeing enough talent for their openings. I hear this everyday from customers. And we tell them the same thing every time. Failing managers count on others to find talent for their organizations. And then blame HR or Talent Acquisition teams.  

This is why failing managers keep average or below average talent. In survey after survey, managers admit they keep sub par talent because they have no one else to do the job. Which is another way of saying that they don’t intend to do that job either. They are simply happy with the notion that someone is doing the work. But the failing employees are not happy! The employees are missing time, or making mistakes, and causing havoc with the rest of the team. Aren’t leaders responsible for budgets, productivity and results? Of course.

how-to-hire-a-players-coverSo why not network to go from being an average or failing leader to one who networks and fills their own jobs? This is what I call keeping your sofa full. (Check out chapter 7 in How to Hire A Players by Eric Herrenkohl.)

Failing (C players) managers blame others and do nothing.

Winning Leaders (A players) get out out to meet talent at trade shows, industry events, chamber meetings, or at civic and social clubs. Leaders get out to build their network. To meet people. To offer help and create value. But they are always working on building their bench and know who their next hire is going to be!

Which type of leader are you?

What is a pipeline of candidates?

April 27th, 2016

A common definition: A pipeline of candidates also referred to as a ‘candidate pipeline’ or ‘talent pipeline‘ is a pool of candidates who are qualified to assume open positions when they are created or vacated through retirement, promotion, or someone leaving the company.

what-is-a-pipeline-of-candidates

To clear up any misconceptions of what a candidate pipeline is, let’s discuss what a pipeline of candidates is not.

A pipeline of candidates is not…

  1. A Resume Database: Any company with an Applicant Tracking System or file of resumes collected over time technically has a ‘database of candidates.’ Likely those same candidates sent their resume to other companies, which means just having the resume isn’t worth much of anything. Has anyone qualified those candidates or built relationships with the people behind the resumes? Without at least a phone screen, a batch of resumes is no more helpful than a pile of blank paper.
  2. A Static, On-call List of Candidates: In the world of recruiting, you’re not buying a thing, you’re buying a person. People have wants and needs, and they often change and evolve. People are promoted, switch jobs, change paths, have different priorities, etc., etc. It’s important to stay in touch with candidates and move people on and off the list of qualified candidates. If you’re buying a pipeline of candidates, you should expect that a Recruitment Consultant is staying in touch with the humans on the list and updating the talent pipeline.
  3. An Exclusive Access Pass to Top Talent: No recruiter has ‘a list of people that no one has. LinkedIn is public and the world is small. Lists may be different but don’t expect that your money can buy something that the company down the street can’t.

Now that we’ve cleared that up, I hope you’ve also learned that developing a pipeline of candidates takes time and requires consistent relationship building. This is what makes a ‘list of names’ investing the time in or worth paying for. Instead of a pile of resumes, a talent pipeline is a list of qualified candidates that have each shared their background, skills, career goals and and interests with a Recruiter and those things line up with your company’s ideal candidate profile.

Building a talent pipeline is a shift from reactive recruiting to proactive recruiting, or recruiting in advance of your hiring needs. So instead of waiting until a position opens or is vacated, you work to fill future openings with talent that is a fit for your business. It means that when you have a new job open or an employee leaves, you can tap your talent pipeline to fill your jobs faster. That’s how a talent pipeline improves your recruiting process.

How Hiring Has Changed From 20 Years Ago

December 29th, 2015

20 years ago…

A Personnel Manager advertised a job by:

  • Senior Java Developer Vacancy in Newspaper. Job Search Concept.Placing an ad in the paper, usually in Sunday’s job section!
  • Handing out applications to walk-in job seekers.
  • Talking to their network, friends & family.
  • Encouraging referrals through sign up sheets/cards that were on the shelf in the HR office with all of the other forms.
  • Calling a temporary agency for a temp.
  • Reaching out to their favorite search firm or headhunter for more difficult positions.

Job seekers applied by:

  • Walk-in resume submission in the office lobby.
  • Sending resumes by fax machine, postal mail, hand delivery or even a courier!
  • Signing up in person at the local temporary agency.
  • Talking to their network, friends & family.

Employers reviewed talent by:

  • Batching and reviewing resumes — Often times a task to do at night in front of the TV.
  • Searching  for talent on Resumix or other early Applicant tracking systems (as time allowed).
  • Calling applicants, returning calls and screening people over the phone (leaving a lot of messages on home voicemail machines)
  • Keeping track of activity with paper sheets or maybe excel.
  • Interviewing people in person.

In the last 20 years, technology and social media have made significant changes to the way we hire talent. What things do you miss about the old-fashioned way of hiring? What technology and social media are you forever grateful for? Are there any new things that you wish were never invented or introduced?

Do your recruiters use the “Recruitment Bulldozer” method?

August 12th, 2015

Outside-In® Chronicles: Originally published with the title Look out for the Recruitment Bulldozer! four years ago this month. Are you a recruiter that bulldozes candidates? Is your company running over candidates to fill jobs? Here’s a suggestion for a more Outside-In® way to recruit. But first, let’s explain what we mean by bulldozing!

Over the years, I have coached many talent acquisition professionals. One of the soundbites that I’m typically heard saying is, “don’t bulldoze!” What do I mean? Recruiters are tasked with presenting our company, knowing what the hiring manager is looking for and understanding technical terms to have knowledgeable discussions with prospects. Once we are prepped for an interview, we get so excited to share what we know, that we tend to pitch the job. This usually sounds something like, “Hi John, I am Chris Burkhard from CBI Group and I am recruiting today for underwater basket weavers.”

The challenge with the job pitch approach is that it doesn’t leave a good next step. If the person is not interested or does not have the right skills, we need to quickly transition to asking for referrals or help with networking. The problem is that with this approach, the majority of recruiters never talk to that person again. We keep plowing ahead for the talent we need for the requisition in front of us. We just keep running callers over to find what we want.Bulldozer Front RetroAfter I say, “Don’t bulldoze” and I have the recruiter’s attention, I suggest a more Outside-In® way to recruit. I certainly did not invent this approach but I have refined it over the years to be more customer centered.

How? Flip the conversation around and focus your conversation on the caller. Find out what matters to the job seeker. What are they trying to accomplish in their career? Focusing on them typically sounds a little different. “John, I help talented underwater basket weavers achieve their next career objective. Could we spend a little time finding out about you and what you might be interested in?” This approach requires a lot of time, energy and curiosity. But isn’t finding out what the person wants helpful to determine if your current opening is a fit right? If not for this req, then perhaps you can be honest and talk in bigger terms — about where your company is going and how the future might involve them.

The focus shifts to building a relationship with the talent. To building potential pipeline. This makes tomorrows’ recruitment easier and this is where good recruiting takes shape. It means you truly know your talent in the marketplace and particular people come to mind when open requisitions fit their career goals and objectives.

It may seem so much easier to take the Bulldozer path. I hear it over and over again, “I do not have the time and I have jobs to fill.” But I think the typical recruiter has it all wrong. None of us should have the time to do it wrong the first time. Recruiting talent and getting to know prospective candidates is what recruiters should and must do to differentiate. No more bulldozing please!
 

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