Category: Talent Acquisition


Being Creative with Your Recruiting Model

March 9th, 2016

What is the best way to find talent for your business?

If I had to sum up a talent acquisition manager’s job, it would be with that question. The people responsible for recruiting in 2016 face the challenge of attracting quality applicants in a candidate’s market, keeping up with hiring demands, and ensuring all this work is on budget. You’re expected to have a streamlined recruiting process with consistent candidate messaging representing your employer brand, and you need to optimize that process for each skill set using targeted and up-to-date tools and methods. Easy day in the life, right?

The competitive market is putting talent acquisition at the top of the business’ strategic goals. If you’re struggling with the best way to find talent for your business in any capacity, it’s time to get creative with your recruiting model.

So, what’s the first step?

The first thing you need to do is identifying the business challenge. To create an effective recruitment solution, first you need to uncover the true source of your recruiting woes. Where’s the gap? What are you struggling with most? Maybe you’ve got a streamlined process and a great employer brand but are not having success finding quality candidates for a specific skill set like sales, IT or healthcare. Perhaps you need better job profiles. Or maybe, it’s not clear or obvious to you.

I’ve identified by recruiting challenge, now what?

Once you know what you need to fix, it makes it easier to build a solution. The first option is an obvious one – if you can identify the problem, you may be able to solve it in-house. But when you can’t identify the problem or don’t know how to fix it, there are lots of options for getting creative with your recruiting model. When it comes to working with recruiting providers for your direct hire roles, you can:

  • Find a full-cycle recruiting partner for help for one position.
  • Hand over all of your hiring from start to finish.
  • Break up recruiting by the skill sets you hire or by geographic regions.
  • Unbundle the recruiting process to get help in one area like sourcing or screening.
  • Bring in on-demand help for projects like opening up a new office/branch or launching a new product.
  • Blend any of the above!

Building a Recruiting Solution

With the complicated and diverse nature of recruitment challenges, creative solutions will help meet hiring objectives. If you’re interested in a free recruitment assessment to identify your recruiting challenge, connect with CBI Group today.

Recruitment-Assessment

 

When to Use an Executive Search Firm

March 1st, 2016

When to use an executive search firmWith every hire, companies have the choice to “stay in house” or outsource to a recruiting company. But how do you know where to draw that line? When should you call on a recruiting agency? This article explores seven scenarios when investing in a search firm is a good idea. And while our companies offer many outsourced recruitment models, this blog examines traditional executive search, also commonly referred to as headhunting.

  1. The Most Obvious. Most often, employers call on an executive search firm for really important roles, especially c-suite or executive leadership roles like CEO, CFO, CTO, CHRO, etc. Not only are leadership positions crucial to the success of the business, but it’s helpful to have a 3rd party perspective to avoid blind hiring (sometimes internal team members see only what they want to see).
  2. Underwater Basket Weavers. In addition to executive-level positions, some companies offer such a unique product or service that they require rare skill sets that are essential for driving core, strategic areas of the business. Pop culture may refer to these candidates as unicorns, we call them Underwater Basket Weavers because, well, how many of those are there out there?! Executive recruiters are used to developing a strategy for finding these ‘needle in a haystack’ candidates.
  3. The Search for the Best. Recruiting is one of those things that anybody can do. Just about anyone can find a person to do a job. But if you’re looking for the ideal candidate who will check all the boxes, you need to work with someone who really knows what they are doing. And executive recruiters generally are the best of the best at what they do and will help you find the best candidate, instead of just any candidate.
  4. You’ve tried, but have not had success. Either you have an active search that has been open too long or you’ve used up your knowledge and recruiting tricks and aren’t sure what to do next. Working with a recruiter opens up your pool of candidates beyond your network.
  5. Brand new roles. Generally, companies are used to filling their core positions — why go to an outside firm when you are in a rhythm? But then they create a brand new position in the company and they don’t know where to begin. This is a good time to ask for help from an expert.
  6. Confidential Search. If you have an employee that is under-performing, you may want to start recruiting before you let them go. Or you may need to recruit talent from organizations that your company does business with. In these cases, a search firm can provide the secrecy you need.
  7. Time & Resources. If your ‘day job’ is not recruiting, you may not have the time or focus to dedicate to an important search. Or your day job may be recruiting but you have too many open and not enough time. When you lack the time and resources, search firms are a great resource for giving an executive search the time and resources necessary.

Working with a search firm is not always a necessity. These seven scenarios are common cases for when it makes sense to hire help. After all, recruiting A players can be complex and requires strategy and a lot of hard work.

Need help with a search?

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Why I Hate Headhunters

January 29th, 2016

Let me start with the ironic truth: I am a headhunter. My family has been in the recruitment business since 1971. We are a family of headhunters. And we have helped more than 50,000 people (our customers) with their career and search. Yes, we have helped them find their next role. So I think I have an earned perspective on what I hate about the very field I live and breathe in each day.

I Hate Head HuntersHeadhunters are selfish.
They tell you about how they make money. Or how much they make. Or worse yet, they perpetuate the notion that they are in the headhunting business just to make money. We all want to work with the pompous ass who brags about paying for his cigarette boat with his commision check, right? Headhunters see value in dollar signs, not human success stories – and that makes their actions and goals selfish.

Headhunters sling resumes.
We have all heard the demand from headhunters: Give me your job opening. Pretty please, hand over your hardest job to fill, the one that has been open forever and you have met with 50+ candidates that don’t fit the bill. Yes, that one. Once a headhunter takes the order, they will sling 10 resumes at you that aren’t even in the right job class. All they are doing is clogging up their “client’s” inbox.

Headhunters’ “clients” often don’t know they are clients.
Please just say yes – that you are open to seeing talent. Then, I will call you my client and push talent and resumes your way. There is no partnership here. And, you certainly don’t feel like a client.

Headhunters disappear when you need them most.
Wow, what’s really aggravating? When a hire blows up at the end of your headhunter’s guarantee period. It’s common for a headhunter to guarantee their placement for 60, 90 or some number of days. Headhunters call their customers all of the time. But then they disappear when there is a problem to avoid replacement hires or giving money back.

Headhunters make placements.
They don’t build recruitment solutions. Each placement is a transaction to a headhunter that means a payout. So headhunters build their goals around how much money they want to make, instead of solving their customers problems. Why do you need your next hire? What are your challenges in finding the right person? Headhunters don’t really care so long as they put a butt in a seat.

So yes, I hate headhunters.
The term headhunter is derogatory. But only because people live up to these stereotypes. And people that don’t live in the industry are left to believe that this is what all recruiters are like.

This is not how my company recruits. Quite frankly many good competitors do OK too. But many headhunters, well, they make it a little easier for the Outside-In Companies to make placements. Because we headhunt talent, but we don’t perpetuate the headhunter myth!

Consider scheduling an info session with our Senior Recruitment Consultant and see for yourself how we’re different.

What is the future of hiring?

January 27th, 2016

Hiring Predictions 2016A few weeks ago, I posted How Hiring Has Changed From 20 Years Ago. Lots of folks were curious and asked, What is the future of hiring? While the future is always uncertain, I have never been shy about making a few predictions.  

My 10 Predictions on the Future of Hiring

  1. Candidate Marketing Automation: Job candidates online behaviors will be tracked and monitored for changing career interests and information will automatically be sent to their inbox about your company (content created by your team or provider of course).
  2. Mobile Technology: It will be possible to complete 100% of the hiring process from a smart phone.
  3. What phone?  All video, all recorded… for all steps in the hiring process.
  4. Automated Referral Programs: The employee referral process will be easier and staff will seamlessly find future talent for the company.
  5. Selling Passive Recruits: The hiring process will be a sales process for the passive job seeker.
  6. No More Resumes: Resumes will no longer exist, your electronic business profile will become the standard!
  7. Networks Still Matter: You will still find jobs by who you know and how well you network and maintain relationships.  Those that leverage digital solutions will do the best job of maintaining business relationships.
  8. Hiring Managers: There will still be a need for Hiring Managers who will maintain their role in hiring process by determining technical fit for positions.
  9. Nurture Talent: Functional roles like HR or Talent Acquisition will drive process for acquiring enough or the right talent through marketing processes that attract, nurture and close talent.
  10. Talent Sharing: A transferable hiring clearance status will be developed across companies and institutions giving the person reciprocity to work for many different companies.

What do you think? Anything you would add? Or debate with me? I would love to hear your opinion.

If you’re interested in discussing the future of your hiring with me, I welcome you to schedule a 30 minute consultation with me. Click here to find time on my calendar.

3 Thoughts for RPO in 2016

January 20th, 2016

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

RPO 2016Another year has passed, and the labor market has continued to be strong as we kick off 2016. There were 2.7 million jobs added in 2015. And we ended the year steadily with the lowest unemployment since 2008; dropping 0.7% from January to December, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. So what can you expect for RPO providers engaging and recruiting talent in 2016?

Talent Pipelining:  With increased hiring comes increased pressure to find the right talent, and find it quickly. This is especially true with 5.4 million open jobs (BLS). RPO Providers will be focused on talent pipeline services in 2016 to help provide clients talent as fast as possible and helping reduce time to fill.

Technology: Technology, our old friend from our 2015 RPO Thoughts. Yet again, technology is a sticking point for this year’s recruiting trends. With the fast paced nature of RPO engagements, technology can streamline processes, saving each partner time and energy. Look for providers that offer real time reporting. Wouldn’t it be nice to have access to your provider’s activity on your hard-to-fill job on a real-time basis? With today’s technology, you shouldn’t have to wait for the next status update from your RPO partner.

Big Data & Analytics: I’m sure you’ve read or heard the words “big data” when looking at trends or predictions. But it’s here, and it’s been here for longer than you might think, driving growth in some very mainstream industries. Data and analytics experts are highly sought talent. Don’t get left behind by partnering with an RPO provider that lacks experience sourcing and engaging these experts successfully.

Looking for recruiting advice in 2016?

Working on recruitment planning? Making changes to your recruitment process? Schedule an info session to discuss your talent acquisition goals and receive recruitment advice from our team – at no cost to you.
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The 1 Thing You Should Be Doing About Talent

December 16th, 2015

People ask me all the time if there are any shortcuts in recruitment. Are there any quick fixes to deal with today’s changing talent landscape? Normally I would lecture you. I’d explain that your talent strategy is as fundamental as your business strategy or marketing plans. However, there is something you can do right now that will help you and your business immensely in the long run.

The one thing you should be doing about talent is keeping the sofa full. Leaders should practice “keeping the sofa full,” by interviewing talent all of the time. (Read my blog on Keeping the Sofa Full here)

Everyday leaders struggle with proactivity and routines. A business needs a rhythm or way of pulsing and discussing what is most important. Where should we put our focus? Where should we put our time and attention? What matters most? Deciding what is most important is the hardest part.

I’ll say it again, your business should be interviewing talent all of the time. It is really that simple. We don’t sell only when we need a new customer. Proactivity is everything. Keeping the sofa full is about always knowing who your next hire is. But I don’t have any openings right now you may be thinking. You may not now, but you will. We all will. That is the one fact in today’s talent-driven economy. Your business and every business will lose some talent for good and not so good reasons. What you do about it is a choice.

When you keep the sofa full, it will take less time to fill your open positions. If you always keep an eye on talent and meet people, it can shorten the days it takes to fill a recently vacated position. Keeping the sofa full also improves your brand and your productivity. Can you find better talent than you have? Can you top grade or upgrade someone who is failing or has average performance? Keeping the sofa full is a direct way to improve your engagement scores and culture at the same time because it requires you to be giving feedback to staff and to know if they are productive and a culture fit.

I know this seems impossible for your company. You’re fighting today’s fire. Dealing with this week’s crisis or business opportunity. The business has a different plan du jour right now. Time is always the enemy for good ideas like this. Recruiting proactively takes planning, discipline and prioritization to interview all of the time. As a leader it takes time, money and most importantly resources to commit to this. It seems like a soft dollar cost savings to turn hiring all of the way off. But have you ever tried to get any program going again when it was turned off completely? It takes retraining, planning, kick off meetings, etc. to breathe life into something that has not been used in a while.

So take action. What are your three most abundant skill sets? What is the hardest role to fill in your business? Build recruiting for these roles into your daily operations. Take all networking calls. Meet any referrals quickly. In short, interview talent all of the time.

Outside-In® Chronicles: Hard In and Easy Out

November 11th, 2015

Outside-In® Chronicles: a throwback post, originally published five years ago in November 2010 While many of the same “people questions” exist, the state of the economy, with the lowest unemployment rate since April 2008 (5.0%), makes the answers or solutions uniquely different. And through all the ups and downs in hiring, our mantra of “hard in, easy out” has remained the same.

Leadership is all about the “people side of the business”. It just seems as if the focus and importance of people issues ebbs and flows with the state of our business. For the last two years, most “people” conversations have been exclusively about cutting costs, reducing head count or associated expenses, and/or plans to create efficiencies. Many businesses find themselves in a spot where they are lean and this means that many, many organizations find themselves panicking quietly about people and talent issues. I hear these questions each and every day with more urgency:

Should we hire to add headcount or use temporaries?
I do not have staff to conduct hiring; how do I get started again?
Should I have a long term strategy or simply react now?
How do I make hiring a core competency? What role should my managers and staff play in the process?

I will let you in on a little secret – HR folks of all kinds are now finding jobs at a steady, if not record clip. We cut them fast and hire them back just as fast. Perhaps a little too fast. Over the last twenty years I have operated within an informal mantra, “It should be hard to get into your company as a new hire, yet very easy to leave”. This statement of hard in, easy out is simple to remember yet profound in its significance to your business.

Concept of confusion and right strategy of a businessman

First, let’s address “hard in”. Your employees want to feel proud of how we bring new staff into the business. It is great if your process for hiring is effective and makes it exclusive. It should be difficult to get hired. Truthfully, it should be a process that never, ever stops. How many of you regret that your stopped viewing talent over the recession? Most of us (if we are honest) know it to be true. We need cash and TALENT to win as opportunities continue to emerge!

The “easy out” is just as important. Trust me when I say that the workforce knows they will not work for you for a lifetime. They expect to have seven or so different roles throughout their career. This reality is reinforced every moment with a media frenzy of companies that make business decisions that impact their workforce! The workforce knows business can no longer afford to be loyal. And surprise! They won’t give it to you anyway. There is too much churn and reality in the business world for anyone to be lulled into a false sense of security. No longer do candidates call us and say, “I am just looking for a safe company that I can stay with for many years.” That is no longer the reality for most employees.

My suggestion is to create an honest, open environment around this issue. Your culture must be capable of accepting the fact that you are “leasing” an employee for a period of time. You want their productivity, their creativity, their innovation and they in turn get fair market value in compensation and learning that makes them a more valuable asset to their careers.

Make it hard to get in to your company, yet make it very easy to leave. Do this and you will have the talent you need and the honesty that makes business simple, refreshing and a great story to share.

Job Market Trends: Plentiful vs Hard to Get

September 23rd, 2015

Something unique is happening in the job market and no one is paying a bit of attention. While most of us were squeezing in one more summer vacation or doing back to school shopping, employees left their jobs in what appears to be record numbers! Allow me to explain.

The US economy is into to its sixth year of job recovery. Relative to the labor market there has been a slow but steady environment of job creation with an average of 211,000 jobs created per month in 2015 while the unemployment rate has dropped .4 percentage points during that time. In August, while a little below average, 173,000 jobs were created, prompting unemployment to drop from 5.3% to 5.1%. All of this has happened right in front of us, with very little impact on the mindsets of employees and hiring managers.

A lack of awareness of the recent turnover makes sense on a base level. We have had very little, if any, wage pressures or inflation. There has been no real pain for employers. Sure, we hear the market talking about some skills sets that are in short supply. That STEM jobs never really felt the recession. But, job postings that used to produce a slate of candidates, well, no longer produce quality candidates. In fact, in July the US set an all time record going back to the year 2000 for the number of jobs posted. Yet hiring was about the same, yet consistent number? Why?

What is the shift? Voluntary Turnover. Every Monday morning we are getting calls and messages pointing out the obvious. Employees are leaving for greener pastures. And, more than likely, they were not even looking for work. They either got a call from a friend, someone sent them a job posting, or perhaps they got a call from a recruiter. At 5.1% there are fewer being laid off, fewer who are unemployed. There are simply less active job seekers available now than there have been since 2007 (pre-recession). And the pressures of this environment are now starting to show during planning sessions with talent acquisition professionals. For most, business is good, earnings are up. Revenues hanging in there. Now we have talent gaps, shortages and resignations? What next?

But Burkhard, where is your hard data? This is just conjecture and first-hand marketplace experience. Trust me, we are looking for others that are studying this. And we are working on plans to launch our own survey very soon. But here is my proof.

The Conference Board just updated Jobs Survey Results — a survey they have done for 20+ years. September is the first time since late 2007 that the proportion of respondents “who are finding jobs plentiful equals that for those who are finding jobs hard to get. The last two times the ‘plentifuls’ first exceeded the ‘hard-to-gets’ after an economic slowdown were 1996 and 2005.” In both of those period jobs, unemployment, and frankly a good economy followed. (Source: Bloomberg, Wells Fargo Investment Institute)

So mark my words: what we see is real. If the economy holds up we are entering a new era in employment. Get ready for turnover. Be prepared for job postings to produce less. Get conditioned to recruitment and talent being critical business issues that hold back your business. Employees have had choices. They and their employers simply did not know it. Demand is so strong that the jobs are coming to them!

I am not sure business is prepared for what’s to come. Expect Monday morning surprises “Hey boss, do you have a minute?” Your talent strategy will stop producing they way it did. Your turnover could and should spike, regardless of your focus on talent, culture and employee engagement. Whatever your talent weakness has been, it will be exploited!

Got data? Lets talk! We have many, many relationships that are seeing this ‘plentiful vs. hard to get’ trend.

Outside-In Team Featured in Delaware Business Times

September 2nd, 2015

On September 1st, members of the Outside-In® team were featured in the Delaware Business Times article, “Job Market: The need for employees with specialized skills spikes.

Our President, Chris Burkhard was quoted, discussing how “the growing employment market would finally give unemployed and underemployed workers the chance to follow their career plan.”

“We are starting to see more opportunities, not that the recession is behind us fully, but people are willing to step back away from a job and try again. I think people are starting to have enough confidence in the market to consider a move from their current jobs,” Burkhard said. “We had the awful 2008-2009 financial crisis. I think there are a lot of people who are unemployed or doing things they don’t really like. I think that’s always a mistake. We’re coming out of an era when people were just happy to have work. It seems the market is finally giving people a chance to pursue their career goals.”

Images and Infographic from Delaware Business Times [Images and Infographic from Delaware Business Times]

Along with Chris, team members Debbie Fincher, Karesa Blagrove, Heather Pelaez, Rich Kolodgie, Shante Hynson and Joshua Wiggins were photographed in our Newark, DE Office. To review the article and learn more about the top job postings in Delaware and current job market trends, click here.

CBI Way: Thorough Intake Leads to Successful Sourcing Strategy

August 26th, 2015

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

In the last CBI Way blog, we discussed improving sourcing efficiency by cutting out defects and weaknesses throughout the sourcing process. So where can your sourcing strategy go wrong? When do you start wasting your time? Let’s start from the beginning of the process; the intake call with the hiring manager.
Businessman Working Calculator Balance Financial Planning Paperwork Concept

Your intake call should be used to gather as much information as possible about the responsibilities and qualifications required for the role. The more questions you can ask the better. Ask why the job is open, what the target fill date is, and everything in between.

An overview of the position can lead you to more probing and specific questions about the desired candidate profile. Use this time with the hiring manager to fully understand what he or she is really looking for in a great candidate, which can often differ from the formal job description and and listed requirements.

Don’t be afraid to ask for the profile of someone who has been hired previously. The closer you can pin down the ideal profile before you begin sourcing, the better. Not only should you think about sourcing the right candidate during the inquisition, but also find out the best selling points for the position itself. These selling points will be important if you’re targeting passive candidates who need to be engaged or motivated to make a move.

Creating an effective sourcing strategy directly depends on the quality of your intake call with the hiring manager. Don’t take it lightly or breeze through it. Think critically, plan your questions, and reach back out after the intake if you feel something may have been missed. A thorough intake conversation will prime your sourcing strategy for success, and create a strong rapport with your hiring partner.

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