Category: Hiring and Recruiting


CBI Way: Thorough Intake Leads to Successful Sourcing Strategy

August 26th, 2015

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

In the last CBI Way blog, we discussed improving sourcing efficiency by cutting out defects and weaknesses throughout the sourcing process. So where can your sourcing strategy go wrong? When do you start wasting your time? Let’s start from the beginning of the process; the intake call with the hiring manager.
Businessman Working Calculator Balance Financial Planning Paperwork Concept

Your intake call should be used to gather as much information as possible about the responsibilities and qualifications required for the role. The more questions you can ask the better. Ask why the job is open, what the target fill date is, and everything in between.

An overview of the position can lead you to more probing and specific questions about the desired candidate profile. Use this time with the hiring manager to fully understand what he or she is really looking for in a great candidate, which can often differ from the formal job description and and listed requirements.

Don’t be afraid to ask for the profile of someone who has been hired previously. The closer you can pin down the ideal profile before you begin sourcing, the better. Not only should you think about sourcing the right candidate during the inquisition, but also find out the best selling points for the position itself. These selling points will be important if you’re targeting passive candidates who need to be engaged or motivated to make a move.

Creating an effective sourcing strategy directly depends on the quality of your intake call with the hiring manager. Don’t take it lightly or breeze through it. Think critically, plan your questions, and reach back out after the intake if you feel something may have been missed. A thorough intake conversation will prime your sourcing strategy for success, and create a strong rapport with your hiring partner.

Do your recruiters use the “Recruitment Bulldozer” method?

August 12th, 2015

Outside-In® Chronicles: Originally published with the title Look out for the Recruitment Bulldozer! four years ago this month. Are you a recruiter that bulldozes candidates? Is your company running over candidates to fill jobs? Here’s a suggestion for a more Outside-In® way to recruit. But first, let’s explain what we mean by bulldozing!

Over the years, I have coached many talent acquisition professionals. One of the soundbites that I’m typically heard saying is, “don’t bulldoze!” What do I mean? Recruiters are tasked with presenting our company, knowing what the hiring manager is looking for and understanding technical terms to have knowledgeable discussions with prospects. Once we are prepped for an interview, we get so excited to share what we know, that we tend to pitch the job. This usually sounds something like, “Hi John, I am Chris Burkhard from CBI Group and I am recruiting today for underwater basket weavers.”

The challenge with the job pitch approach is that it doesn’t leave a good next step. If the person is not interested or does not have the right skills, we need to quickly transition to asking for referrals or help with networking. The problem is that with this approach, the majority of recruiters never talk to that person again. We keep plowing ahead for the talent we need for the requisition in front of us. We just keep running callers over to find what we want.Bulldozer Front RetroAfter I say, “Don’t bulldoze” and I have the recruiter’s attention, I suggest a more Outside-In® way to recruit. I certainly did not invent this approach but I have refined it over the years to be more customer centered.

How? Flip the conversation around and focus your conversation on the caller. Find out what matters to the job seeker. What are they trying to accomplish in their career? Focusing on them typically sounds a little different. “John, I help talented underwater basket weavers achieve their next career objective. Could we spend a little time finding out about you and what you might be interested in?” This approach requires a lot of time, energy and curiosity. But isn’t finding out what the person wants helpful to determine if your current opening is a fit right? If not for this req, then perhaps you can be honest and talk in bigger terms — about where your company is going and how the future might involve them.

The focus shifts to building a relationship with the talent. To building potential pipeline. This makes tomorrows’ recruitment easier and this is where good recruiting takes shape. It means you truly know your talent in the marketplace and particular people come to mind when open requisitions fit their career goals and objectives.

It may seem so much easier to take the Bulldozer path. I hear it over and over again, “I do not have the time and I have jobs to fill.” But I think the typical recruiter has it all wrong. None of us should have the time to do it wrong the first time. Recruiting talent and getting to know prospective candidates is what recruiters should and must do to differentiate. No more bulldozing please!
 

What are the Hot Jobs of Summer 2015?

July 22nd, 2015

Last month we posted Hiring: All Signs Point to Growth, but are you wondering which industry groups top the employment growth charts? And which industries rank the lowest? Staffing Industry Analysts released the Hottest U.S. Job Markets: July 2015 Update earlier this month that answers these very questions.

Of 11 major industry groups, here’s how they ranked according to their composite growth score (CGS factors in the average monthly job growth over the prior 12, 6 and 3 months, as well as the level of acceleration or deceleration in growth observed over each of those periods).

  1. Professional and business services (74)
  2. Education and health services (72)
  3. Trade, transportation, and utilities (67)
  4. Leisure and Hospitality (64)
  5. Construction (62)
  6. Financial activities (47)
  7. Manufacturing (43)
  8. Information (43)
  9. Other Services (41)
  10. Government (37)
  11. Mining and Logging (15)

As you can see, of the 11 major industry groups, ‘professional and business services’ ranked highest in employment growth with a CGS of 74, and Mining and Logging ranked lowest with a CGS of 15. Within these major industry groups, 247 specific industries were ranked individually. Among all of the industries, here are the top 5 industries with the highest employment growth:

  1. Retail – Warehouse clubs and supercenters (78)
  2. Nonresidential electrical contractors (76)
  3. Computer systems design and related services (76)
  4. Management consulting services (76)
  5. Residential specialty trade contractors (74)

The 5 industries with the lowest employment growth were:

  1. Support activities for oil and gas operations (9)
  2. Agricultural, construction, and mining machinery (17)
  3. Oil and gas pipeline construction (19)
  4. Oil and gas extraction (21)
  5. Wholesale – Recyclable materials (21)

It’s also important to understand how many jobs there are in each of these industries. While some industries may have a high growth score, there may not be that many jobs overall in the industry. And then there may be some industries that do not have a very high CGS, but still employ a lot of people. So which industries boast a high CGS AND have a high overall employment number in summer 2015?

Industry  Composite Growth Score   Employment (in thousands) 
Retail – Warehouse Clubs & Supercenters 78 1,425
Hospitals 73 4,864
Computer Systems Design and Related Services 73 1,846
Offices of Physicians 71 2,538
Services for the Elderly and Disabled 70 1,526
Temporary Help Services 66 2,883
Restaurants and Other Eating Places 63 9,993



So what does this tell us? Any of the following would be a good place to look for jobs: healthcare jobs in hospitals, temp jobs at temporary employment agencies like Placers, jobs servicing the elderly and disabled, medical jobs at doctor’s offices, IT Jobs in all industries – and of course retail and restaurant jobs. Each are hot, hot, hot this summer 2015!

CBI Way: Improve Your Sourcing Efficiency

July 15th, 2015

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

Sourcing and identifying qualified candidates can sometimes be tedious, frustrating work. While this isn’t groundbreaking news to many in the talent acquisition world, it is also a pain point that can be resolved by taking a step back, and examining your sourcing process. By identifying the defects or weaknesses in your sourcing process or strategy, you can create a more polished, more efficient method to your sourcing madness.

Creating a sourcing strategy can contribute to smooth, effective, and efficient sourcing. However, if there is a defect in your process prior to executing the strategy, a well thought out plan can only do so much. For example, it’s important to completely understand the job requirements, specifications and responsibilities before moving forward. When you jump into sourcing without a total comprehension of the job, your time invested can easily become a wasted effort. And that wasted effort will likely negatively impact your overall success. sourcing-efficiencyBeyond the initial strategy, you may also want to look at your sourcing metrics to measure how different sources are performing.

Posting job opportunities can be a great way to have candidates quickly pipelined. And job boards can still be effective, with 25% of job seekers saying that found their job by responding to a job board posting (International Association of Employment Web Sites). However, in 2006, that same survey said more than 31% of job seekers had the same response. So, how can you improve your efficiency with posting jobs? Think about your sources for posting. Not all resumes or applications are a fit for you position, and when you have a lot of “rejects” it will negatively impact your efficiency. While it doesn’t seem like a huge problem, every resume you must review as a sourcer, takes away from time you can be digging for candidates you know are an ideal fit. Can you eliminate a source that doesn’t produce quality candidates?

Sourcing is critical to the recruiting process and strong sourcing practices help ensure you meet critical metrics with regularity. Ultimately, weaknesses in your sourcing process can hurt your efficiency as you continue to execute your strategy. Don’t be afraid to take a breath, step back, and identify any defects that you may be overlooking while digging deep in the depths of the world wide web. Afterall, information is the critical ingredient to improve efficiency.

Have you heard about our talent pipelining service, talentSOURCE? Learn about the sourcing service and benefits by downloading the talentSOURCE PDF.

Magic or Science? How Talent Acquisition is Misunderstood

July 1st, 2015

Outside-In® Chronicles: Originally published with the title Talent Acquisition is a Science in July, 2011, this article still rings true today. Today the market may be different and there are new recruiting methodologies, but there is still a science behind recruiting that is misunderstood.

Talent Acquisition professionals are misunderstood. Generally, recruiters are rebellious. We color outside the lines and come and go when we please. Often times, this freedom is misinterpreted. Our work can be considered soft, simple, easy. But frankly, we never stop recruiting. We work at night and on weekends and there is science behind the mysterious, magical quality of our work.

Crazy scientist in glasses with a bulb or test-tube We often hear things like, “I don’t know how you do it, but can you get me another one just like Mary (or John or whomever).” It is this mystery and ambiguity that makes our work seem more like art than true science.

I have managed more than 1,000 recruiters in my career and I can share from experience that only a few are born to recruit. Those that are born with it have some common traits. They are naturally curious, they care about people and they have the energy of the “Energizer Bunny”. They go, go, go 24/7 and they move mountains for their customers. They make it look easy, when it is not. This work ethic, curiosity and personality can get you started but it takes great science to be a good recruiter.

The trouble with the science of recruiting is that there is not one standard formula. When it comes to hiring, our clients respect education and certifications. There are CPA’s, MBA’s, RN’s, EE’s… you name it, these certifications and degrees are a symbol of excellence in a particular field. But how do you know when a recruiter has reached a certain level? That they know, understand and excel in their field? For recruiters, it is not as cut and dry. We learn by doing and sometimes we are lucky to have a good mentor show us the way. We can take some course work or get an Internet certification, but we do not have certifications that translate. Have you heard of CPC or CTS? Probably not. I have had both, but now they mean nothing.

All we do is run Internet searches or review our databases. Right? This misunderstanding of our profession means we aren’t typically viewed with strategic importance. We are rock stars for a year. We are homeless the next. Our expertise is necessary during certain times of a business cycle like growth, acquisition, new product or business unit launches. But we have to be creative with our skills to show our value in down times of the business cycle.

Our customers see outcomes (the people we hire, the requisitions that aren’t filled) not process. They don’t care about things like sourcing or behavioral based interviews because they need what they need when they need it. But take a minute to think about the people on your team. Would you hire them if it were up to you? How would you find the right people to build the best team? With enough thought I think you’d agree that people are really the science behind the strategy — and good recruiters are the science behind it all.

Download our recent white paper to learn some of the science behind creating a sourcing strategy, and why you shouldn’t start recruiting without one.

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Hiring: All Signs Point to Growth

June 24th, 2015

After reviewing recent news about recruiting and staffing trends in 2015, all signs point to growth. Below are excerpts from industry surveys and forecasts published this month (June 2015), and CBI Group President, Chris Burkhard’s response to the hiring optimism.

2015 recruiting trends

CFOs in the US are more confident now than they have been in years. – American Staffing Association
The 2015 CFO Outlook Survey conducted by Financial Executives International and Baruch College’s Zicklin School of Business found “67% of respondents indicated they have plans to hire at their company in the next six months, representing the highest percentage of CFOs to respond positively to this question in three years. The survey also found 77% of CFOs were not forced to reduce headcount over the past 12 months. Furthermore, 74% of respondents said wage levels they are paying are on the rise. The optimism index for US CFOs’ own businesses increased to 74.01 in this quarter’s survey, the highest reported since 2006.”

May Jobs numbers FAR exceeded expectations. – CareerBuilder
“U.S. employers added 280,000 jobs in May, which is the biggest job gain since the end of 2014 and much higher than the 225,000 jobs economists were expecting. That’s especially good news if you look back at some of the numbers from earlier this year.”

All metro areas set for job growth this year. – US Conference of Mayors
“2015 will mark the first year all 363 metro areas will see job growth since the economic recovery began, according to a new economic forecast released by the US Conference of Mayors and prepared by ISH Global Insight. The forecast also projects 316 metros, 87%, will see job growth greater than 1.0%, with only 47 areas, 13%, experiencing job growth of 1.0% or less.”

US staffing employment up more than 5% over year. – American Staffing Association
US staffing companies employed an average of 3.13 million temporary and contract workers per week in the first quarter of 2015, up 5.5% from the same period in 2014, according to data released today by the American Staffing Association. “Even with weak economic growth in the first quarter, demand for temporary and contract talent increased as businesses increased the size of their flexible and permanent workforces,” said ASA President and CEO Richard Wahlquist. “The continued growth in staffing employment means more long-term opportunities for job seekers.”

The US is projected to create 8 million jobs from 2014-2019 — a 5% increase. – CareerBuilder

“CareerBuilder has released a list of the industries expected to add jobs at an accelerated pace from 2014 to 2019… and it’s not just STEM jobs that look to have especially promising growth in the next several years. Technology and globalization continue to change the composition of the US workforce and push our economy in new directions. Based on EMSI’s data from more than 90 national and state employment resources, it appears the US is projected to create roughly 8 million jobs from 2014 to 2019 – a 5 percent increase. A significant number of industries will likely experience an even greater percentage gain during this period.

Around one-third of all U.S. industries are expected to outperform the national average for employment growth over the next five years. While it’s not surprising that technology and health care made the list, the accumulation of new jobs will take place within a diverse mix of industries requiring a broad range of skills and experience.”

The list represents 20 industries that are projected to add at least 10,000 jobs and experience 15% growth in employment over the next five years.

CBI Group President, Chris Burkhard’s response to signs of growth:

I am never more concerned than when all signs point to good times. Not to be contrarian in nature just for the sake of it. However, all of this demand, hiring and need for a contingent workforce solution will require a dramatic shift in how employers approach this “problem.” No longer can you post and pray with job boards or simply spend money to solve it. Organizations are going to need to make Talent Acquisition a strategy just like Finance, Operations, Sales and Marketing. And this time it is going to need to be foundational — pretty marketing around your employer brand or adding a few more recruiters on contract will not provide a sustainable fix. Talent strategy will need to be forever! Or until the next downturn or recession. And even then, great firms will be in a spot to take advantage of their strong position by scooping up the best talent!

CBI Way: Engaging Your Talent Pipeline

June 17th, 2015

By Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

Just as important as getting your talent pipeline started is keeping that same pipeline engaged with your business. Long before a position that needs to be filled quickly opens, you should be building relationships with the talent pools you’ve created or identified. There are number of ways to engage your pipeline. The methods that will work best for your talent pipeline will probably depend on the type of candidates that are in your pool. Let’s take a look at two strategies for engaging those candidates; social media and in-person networking.

According to a survey by ERE, just 38% of employers continuously recruit throughout a year. Talent pipelining is almost exactly that; keeping in touch with quality candidates, and forming a relationship that could pay dividends in the future. Your pipeline is like your business’ network. Think about sponsoring live networking events at a local college and give young professionals an inside look into your business, its values, and its goals. If you’re recruiting healthcare workers, promote an event for healthcare workers to your healthcare talent pipeline. Set a meeting place, a speaker, and an interesting presentation on new trends in the medical field, and explain the value the information could provide. Follow up the event with an email survey to the attendees in your pipeline and ask them to rate their experience and if they would attend another similar event for medical professionals.

The combination of personal networking and social media content can go a long way in keeping your pipeline engaged. The candidates could be interested in the next event or may be looking for more relevant content about their industry or even your company. Don’t forget to use social media and web content to your advantage. It’s easily accessible, simple to send out, and is a critical tool for keeping your pipeline aware and engaged.

Have you heard about our talent pipelining service, talentSOURCE? Learn about the sourcing service and benefits by downloading the talentSOURCE PDF.

CBI Way: Employment Situation and Talent Acquisition

July 16th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton 

The recent June employment situation released early this month has shed some new light on the workforce changes occurring since the new year. Another 288,000 jobs (predicted) were added in June, marking the fifth consecutive month more than 200,000 were added. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this is the first time since September, 1999 to January 2000, this has happened, almost fifteen years ago. Additionally, the 1.4 Millions jobs added in the first half of 2014, is also the highest number since the first half of that same year, 1999. Equally impressive is the unemployment rate of 6.1%, which has fallen 1.4% over the past year, the sharpest year-to-year decline in almost three decades, according to the BLS. While exciting, the report not only tells us something about the improving job market, but also speaks to the evolving and challenging world of sourcing and recruiting. In this CBI Way Blog, let’s first discuss the groundwork, sourcing.

ID-10098602More jobs and a lower unemployment rate means less candidates who are actively pursuing a new opportunity. As a refresher, active candidate sourcing is related to those candidates that are unhappy, concerned with their job security, or unemployed, for example. Active candidates are easier to find, as not only are they likely looking for you, the employer, but you are searching for them. Resumes are easy to find and applications aplenty. On the other hand, those candidates which are happy, fully employed, and not thinking about possibly making a move, prove much more difficult to identify, but are often the type quality talent being sought.

Passive sourcing is about generating interest, creating excitement, and establishing relationships, and networking with candidates about the opportunity. Whether by phone, email, or social networks, passive sourcing requires a focus on the candidate. Creating a strategy of who to target, where to target, and HOW to target these individuals is key. Where are they in their career? What sparks their interest? Who may they know? These are some questions that could potentially help with marketing your opportunity and employer brand in the best way possible. Still not interested? Make sure to express your desire to help if they may ever be in the market, or if anything changes in their career. The stronger network you have, the more options available to proactively source and engage the marketplace of talent.

4 Things The Avengers Taught Me About Talent Acquisition

April 9th, 2014

By Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewski

TAMarvel2Anyone and everyone in the industry knows that finding superhero talent is rare and extremely hard to do. When looking for new talent you need to ensure that their skillset can coincide with the team and work together to fulfill the purpose of the business. Each member of your team must bring a unique expertise that ultimately strives for the success of the organization and the growth of the company.

Here are some things to remember when looking beyond masks and capes:

1. Superhero powers are rendered useless if not harnessed and executed properly. Nobody wants a hulk candidate smashing everything in sight, or an archer that cannot master the skill to hit a target. It’s important to look for talent that not only meets the skill requirement, but also has the proven ability to use said skills in action. Screen for specifics and ask for examples of a time your candidate used these skills to overcome common obstacles in your industry.

2. Resumes can be deceiving. Sure, they graduated top of their class from MIT and have two master’s degrees under their armor prior to the age of 19. That doesn’t mean the man behind the iron is the right person for your team or a cultural fit for your company. Face to face interviews with the entire staff are crucial. Bring them into your office and see how they interact with every single person in the company and try to weed out any signs of evil.

3. Candidates must be up to date on all technology and facets of your industry. Although your super serum-enhanced candidate can wield a shield and have an unprecedented patriotism toward your company, they may have been asleep for the last 70 years when it comes to current technology and practices. Whatever your industry, it’s important to troll for candidates that are ahead of the game and know “the next best thing.” If your stellar candidate is slightly lacking in this category, make sure that they have the willingness and drive to learn quickly.

4. Always be comfortable with being in BETA. A company’s work is never “finished”. Look for candidates who can wear multiple suits and focus towards creating a 2.0 improved version. Businesses boom when employees are superhuman and innovative. Troll for candidates with diverse backgrounds within your industry and you can bet on an unstoppable force of business growth and development.

You don’t need Charles Xavier or Cerebro to locate your next talent. At Outside-In® Companies, we offer Blank Sheet of Paper Recruitment Solutions that are completely customizable for your needs! We can help you.

Boiling Down the State of People in the Clinical/Scientific Industry

February 24th, 2014

Jobs and People by the Numbers

BioScience-Job-GrowthBased on the numbers in our infographic below (scroll down to take a look!), we know that number of jobs in the Clinical/Scientific Industry have been increasing, predicted to be at 97% of peak levels in 2014, and also anticipated to continue to grow through to 2022 by 10%. STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) occupations will continue to remain center stage, with more than one in four employers (26%) planning to create jobs in these areas over the next 12 months.

We also know that clinical/scientific jobs are at the top of the list of skillsets for which employers need help finding qualified potentials. And that 60% of CFO’s say it is somewhat or very challenging to find skilled candidates for professional-level positions today.

Finally, when it comes to workers, we know that more professionals are seeking new jobs in 2014 than they have been in prior years since the recession. While various sources present drastically different percentages of workers that will look for a new job this year, they report that in 2014 the percentage is greater than it has been since the recession. Our sources also note that workers are more optimistic about the outlook of the coming year.

CareerBuilder states that, “A drop in job satisfaction may account for the expected rise in turnover.” The percentage of workers that are satisfied with their jobs dropped from 66% in 2013 to 59% this year; and those that are dissatisfied rose from 15% last year to 18% in 2014. The top reasons cited for dissatisfaction are salary (66%) and not feeling valued (65%).

So, how can we boil all this down?

At the Outside-In® Companies, we see these numbers in action daily while serving our customers in the pharmaceutical and bioscience industries. More companies are hiring for positions so demand is high, which makes recruiting quality candidates more difficult. With this shortage of people, companies have to be creative in their recruiting. So taking advantage of the positive outlook both c-suite executives AND workers have for the coming year, how can employers identify and win over great candidates?

Here are five tips for your company to consider:

Marketing Your Company: Workers may feel optimistic about the coming year, however they won’t take the decision to jump jobs lightly. Your company needs to market itself to potential candidates so they become aware of who you are and what makes you so great. Understand that this is a long-term investment, that changing the market’s perception of you will take time and you won’t see the pay off immediately. In many cases, the market doesn’t know about you, doesn’t know much about you, or they think negative things about you – so focus on increasing your brand’s awareness and generating a positive impression on people so they want to work for you.

Beef-up Your Employee Referral Program: Your employees already work for you for one reason or another, which makes them some of your best assets! Encourage your people to bring their friends on board – they are likely to have similar interests and similar values that will fit in with your culture. You can encourage employees by simply asking them to refer people they know for current openings, but also consider how you can “pay” people for their efforts. Many companies offer bonuses when employees’ referrals are hired, or when the person sticks around for 6 months. Good employee referral programs are often the top source of hiring!

Perk Up Your Benefits: Sure, people may be considering switching jobs this year, but with salary and “feeling valued” at the top of the list for dissatisfaction, they need to know that they will be getting better benefits in a new job. How does your compensation compare to your competition? How does your culture recognize its people? “Offering frequent recognition, merit bonuses, training programs and clearly defined career paths are important ways to show workers what they mean to the company,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. In this market, the candidates are calling the shots – so what do you have to offer them that is shinier than what they currently have?

Consider Temps and Independent Contractors: The Bureau of Labor Statistics released on February 7th that there were 2.78 million contract and temp workers in the temporary help services industry in the U.S. 2.78 million is the largest number of temps in the workforce ever. More workers are pursuing contract work or being independent consultants, so consider bringing quality candidates in as independent contractors. The world is going temp, so this is likely a good option for bringing in the best people for the job.

Location, Location, RELOCATION:
With a shortage of quality applicants and trouble finding the right people, your company might want to consider relocation. By expanding your search outside your geographic region, you can easily increase your candidate pool. You’ll want to look back at tip #3 to help convince people to make such a move to work for you, but it’s probably worth it so you don’t have to keep scratching your head looking at the same resumes again and again.

Infographic – Presenting the Numbers

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