Category: Talent Sourcing


Using SMART Goals to Get Your Job Search Strategy in Shape

June 16th, 2017

Creating specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, timely (SMART) goals is a great way to organize a job search not only in Delaware, but anywhere you go. No matter where you look for employment, you will have competition. Some of that competition will have industry connections or more experience. However, this does not count you out. If your job search is precise, you may be able to discern opportunities that others pass over. You will pay attention to that crucial detail that the employer is searching for. Also, you will be able to fit your job search into your already busy life.

Here is how to use SMART to get your job search strategy in shape.

Specific

Do not waste your time applying to jobs that you are not qualified for – getting a job is not a numbers game. You will have a much better chance at fast employment by creating a strong network with people who believe in your specific skill set. If you partner with a staffing agency that specializes in your core competency, your market will open up more immediately. However, you need to understand your own core competency first, so sit down and determine your day one skill set before you start sending out resumes.

Measurable

Too many prospective employees do not take the time to quantify their worth to employers. This may sound a bit cold hearted, but we are talking business! If you understand exactly how to measure your worth to employers, you will also have a better indication of the salary that you can draw. You will also be able to more specifically define the temp jobs that are worth your time if you can show your ROI and justify your hourly wage.

Attainable

You may not be able to shoehorn your way into full time employment. However, this does not mean that you cannot have a full time income. Working with the right employment agency can get your foot in the door through a number of temp jobs. These employers may want to take you on full time, or you may find another employer with a stronger resume. The goal is to reach for something attainable and climb your way up the employment ladder, step by step.

Relevant

Stick to relevant jobs and relevant partners. If you focus on your skill set and primary industry, you can develop a reputation. Although you may find the occasional position outside of your core competency, you should not focus your energy in more than one place.

Timely

Being on time is certainly important in the job search market. However, having a timely presence is more than just showing up on the 12. You should have a timely knowledge of your industry that you can communicate to potential employers. There is a reason that many employers are looking to hire Millennials – the stereotype is that Millennials are more well versed in modern technology. Update your resume and your talking points consistently for best results in your search.

Targeting your audience – Arrow and target – Colorful version

Developing Future Leaders with Talent Pools

November 16th, 2016

With thousands of baby boomers entering retirement each day, organizations are understandably looking for ways to retain and develop promising talent with future leadership potential. Along with the mass exodus of a vital part of the workforce, a potential wealth of knowledge is poised to leave along with them—and companies must find a way to transfer that knowledge to new and up-and-coming employees.

An effective talent strategy is necessary to keep an organization’s hiring processes running smoothly. Whether you are planning to replace an employee with a new hire or promote within the company, certain roles and responsibilities are better served when groomed from within the organization. This is especially true if the company can’t find qualified candidates to fill a vacancy or when the need for company-specific knowledge outweighs the value of bringing in a more qualified outside hire.

Internal development strategies that satisfy both the need to identify and notify applicable succession candidates can be challenging for even the most innovative talent acquisition teams. Talent pools can provide an effective solution when an organization isn’t in a position to single out any one employee as a future leader, or perhaps wants to build a talent pipeline outside of the business to be ready for future needs.

What is the Value of a Talent Pool?Kids in a Swimming Pool, children for summer season. Kid inflatable pool, child swimming in the pool, Vector Illustration

Talent pools can be comprised of high-potential employees who are being conditioned to take on more responsibilities and higher-level projects within the company, or talent identified from other companies who would be potential high value hires in the future. High-performing employees are fully engaged employees who embrace the corporate culture and constantly strive to perform their duties at a top-level.  These employees might also be considered high-potential employees who have expressed an interest in advancing within the organization along with possessing certain competencies and values that the organization desires in their leaders.

Talent pools help organizations prepare for succession by allowing the organization to develop a talent group made up of multiple promising individuals. If an organization is unsure about where or when it will have the need for future leaders, a talent pool affords the option of keeping a group of high-performing, high-potential employees ready for deployment should the need arise, or reach out to identified talent to field future interest in your company.

From an employee’s perspective, being part of a talent pool can be a reassuring step toward career advancement. Employees at this level know they are valued, they feel confident that they have a future with the company, and they are rewarded with the knowledge that their employer is consciously investing in their future leadership potential.

If your organization isn’t ready to start pinning down succession prospects, implementing a talent pool can be a great way to develop multiple skills in diverse groups of promising employees. While some staffing vacancies can be effectively filled by recruiting new talent, identified outside of the company, the future of the company’s leadership can also be successful by investing in high-performing and high-potential internal talent for future promotion.

Is Passive Talent Better Than Active Job Seekers?

August 10th, 2016

Balance weighing two spheres blue and red. Scales measuring abstract objects. Comparison choice confusion exchange and decision concept. EPS 8 vector illustration no transparency

One of the more difficult aspects of sourcing and recruiting is engaging with passive talent. It takes a thoughtful and strategic plan, and even a detailed plan isn’t guaranteed to work. So it’s leaves you to wonder — is passive talent better than active candidates, anyway?

The answer isn’t clear. There are benefits to both hiring active and passive talent. Passive talent is often that very niche pool of candidates that has a specialized skill set, and therefore highly sought and generally very valuable to any company. Therefore, recruiting passive talent can be expensive and time consuming, especially without an efficient talent acquisition process.

Active candidates are at least keeping their ears open for a new opportunity and often pursuing those roles proactively. Sometimes, this can mean the candidate is more willing to make a move, will make that move more quickly, and for less of a salary increase. At the same time, why are they actively looking for a new role, good or bad?

Again, it’s hard to determine if one type of candidate is better than the other. Both have their traditional qualities, and both could be the absolute right fit for your company. Generally, having a preference before going into the recruiting process could create undesirable gaps in your talent acquisition process.

How to Recruit Passive Candidates, Part 2

July 20th, 2016

As discussed, the goal of of sourcing passive candidates is to build relationships with highly skilled pools of talent. You usually won’t find passive candidate resumes online, and engagement requires a strategic and thoughtful approach. So, what can you do?

passive candidate pool First, it’s important to build your pool, and in turn, your network. A great way to be successful is name generation. While resumes are nearly impossible to find, names are not. You know your target candidate, and you know the companies where they work. In it’s simplest form, creating an excel spreadsheet with columns of name, title, company, location, and contact info is a great start.

Use all the channels possible to build your pool; LinkedIn, associations, conferences, company websites, and universities, just to name a few. Put every name you find that is attached to the target industry and expertise for which you’re looking on the list. It can’t hurt to have more than you need when building a pool for passive sourcing.

With your list or ‘talent pool’ complete, you can begin to engage. You can start with your primary targets, or folks you know wouldn’t be an exact fit, but could be a great referral source. Modify your email or message for each set of candidates, requesting their expertise to identify the extremely niche skill set you seek.

More often than not, people are willing to help, point you in a good direction, or even have a colleague who would be interested that you missed. It’s important to be thorough and resilient when sourcing passive candidates, traits that will set you apart from every other sourcer or recruiter in the war for talent.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

Request a Recruitment Assessment button

What is sourcing in recruitment process?

July 6th, 2016

Sourcing Recruitment ProcessSourcing is a common term, often used in the procurement of services and vendors. But sourcing is also commonly used in regards to talent acquisition. So what is sourcing in the recruitment process? Since not all jobs can be filled by posting a job online and having applicants find you, you (or someone on behalf of your company) have to go find good candidates to fill your position. That is sourcing.

Sourcing is a talent acquisition discipline which is focused on the identification, assessment and engagement of skilled worker candidates through proactive recruiting techniques (Wiki).

But wait, isn’t that recruiting? While sourcing is a discipline within the recruiting process, there is a distinction between sourcing and recruiting. Check out our article How is Talent Sourcing Different from Recruiting? There is also some heated debate over the definition of Sourcing vs. Recruiting, and whether recruiters are sourcers are recruiters.

What do you think?

What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?

June 1st, 2016

talent-sourcer-sourcing-roleAs Talent Acquisition evolves, so do the roles involved in the process. One of the first challenges when deciding to hire new talent, is identifying the talent itself. Usually, the team member who tackles this challenge is the Talent Sourcer, also referred to as a Sourcing Specialist, Sourcer, Internet Recruiter, Recruiting Researcher, Candidate Attraction Specialist or Talent Scout. What does the Talent Sourcer do on a daily basis?

In it’s most standard definition, a Sourcer’s function in Talent Acquisition is the proactive identification of candidates that match a desired skill set for a current or future job opening. Yet, it is certainly more involved and detailed than such a general definition. While a Recruiter often handles the back end of Talent Acquisition, the Sourcer will handle the primary responsibilities of the process.

A Talent Sourcer is responsible for creating the Sourcing Strategy, which sets the entire process up for success. With strategy in hand, Sourcers proactively identify and engage with skilled workers to fill a current or future need, often gauging and generating interest in the opportunity. Depending on the strategy, reaching out to possible candidates via social media, email, and/or phone calls is also included in the Sourcer’s daily tasks.

While a quick phone screen may included, a Talent Sourcer usually stops short of interviewing and dispositioning, as well as on-boarding and negotiating offers. Sourcers and Recruiters work hand-in-hand, but tend to have defined roles during the recruitment process. Without defined roles and responsibilities, Talent Acquisition can quickly become scattered, and ultimately lack the efficiency that drives a great candidate experience.

Need to define the roles on your talent acquisition team?

Recruitment-Assessment

How is talent sourcing different from recruiting?

May 13th, 2016

recruiter-vs-sourcing-specialistRecruiting in the traditional sense includes at the very least some talent sourcing. Both sourcing and recruiting are often intertwined skills and responsibilities. But more recently, Talent Acquisition strategy is trending toward a more specialized approach, separating talent sourcing and recruiting roles. So what’s the difference between sourcing and recruiting, anyway?

Typically, recruiting includes reworking job descriptions, choosing candidates from a pipeline, leading the interview process, and managing offers and on-boarding. Specifically, recruiting does not often include the proactive identification of candidates outside of the talent pipeline. That pipeline is the product of excellent talent sourcing.

Successful talent sourcing requires a thoughtful and detailed strategy. Identifying, engaging, generating interest, and ultimately building a pipeline of candidates can either make or break the talent acquisition process. Therefore, sourcing talent has become a specialized skill set, requiring in-depth knowledge of techniques, tools, and channels that differ from the skill set and strengths of a recruiter.

Of course, Talent Acquisition thrives on the consistency and collaboration of both talent sourcing and recruiting. Consequently, there is a emphasis on information sharing and teamwork for either to be deemed successful. Don’t be afraid to think about your recruiting process critically — you just may identify a weakness that could be easily corrected.

Why Managers are Failing to Hire – It’s not always HR’s Fault

May 4th, 2016

Often, managers keep C talent in roles too long. Here’s why networking can help.

First, it’s important to understand what today’s economy and labor market look like:

  1. There are a lot of job openings.
  2. Unemployment is low.
  3. 1 in 3 workers that is happy, however, they intend to change jobs.

Yes, we are now in a market where happy workers are moving around and ready for their next challenge!

In a candidate’s market, what do managers do about hiring for their team/department/division? I know what they do. Complain to Human Resources and to their boss that they are not seeing enough talent for their openings. I hear this everyday from customers. And we tell them the same thing every time. Failing managers count on others to find talent for their organizations. And then blame HR or Talent Acquisition teams.  

This is why failing managers keep average or below average talent. In survey after survey, managers admit they keep sub par talent because they have no one else to do the job. Which is another way of saying that they don’t intend to do that job either. They are simply happy with the notion that someone is doing the work. But the failing employees are not happy! The employees are missing time, or making mistakes, and causing havoc with the rest of the team. Aren’t leaders responsible for budgets, productivity and results? Of course.

how-to-hire-a-players-coverSo why not network to go from being an average or failing leader to one who networks and fills their own jobs? This is what I call keeping your sofa full. (Check out chapter 7 in How to Hire A Players by Eric Herrenkohl.)

Failing (C players) managers blame others and do nothing.

Winning Leaders (A players) get out out to meet talent at trade shows, industry events, chamber meetings, or at civic and social clubs. Leaders get out to build their network. To meet people. To offer help and create value. But they are always working on building their bench and know who their next hire is going to be!

Which type of leader are you?

What is a pipeline of candidates?

April 27th, 2016

A common definition: A pipeline of candidates also referred to as a ‘candidate pipeline’ or ‘talent pipeline‘ is a pool of candidates who are qualified to assume open positions when they are created or vacated through retirement, promotion, or someone leaving the company.

what-is-a-pipeline-of-candidates

To clear up any misconceptions of what a candidate pipeline is, let’s discuss what a pipeline of candidates is not.

A pipeline of candidates is not…

  1. A Resume Database: Any company with an Applicant Tracking System or file of resumes collected over time technically has a ‘database of candidates.’ Likely those same candidates sent their resume to other companies, which means just having the resume isn’t worth much of anything. Has anyone qualified those candidates or built relationships with the people behind the resumes? Without at least a phone screen, a batch of resumes is no more helpful than a pile of blank paper.
  2. A Static, On-call List of Candidates: In the world of recruiting, you’re not buying a thing, you’re buying a person. People have wants and needs, and they often change and evolve. People are promoted, switch jobs, change paths, have different priorities, etc., etc. It’s important to stay in touch with candidates and move people on and off the list of qualified candidates. If you’re buying a pipeline of candidates, you should expect that a Recruitment Consultant is staying in touch with the humans on the list and updating the talent pipeline.
  3. An Exclusive Access Pass to Top Talent: No recruiter has ‘a list of people that no one has. LinkedIn is public and the world is small. Lists may be different but don’t expect that your money can buy something that the company down the street can’t.

Now that we’ve cleared that up, I hope you’ve also learned that developing a pipeline of candidates takes time and requires consistent relationship building. This is what makes a ‘list of names’ investing the time in or worth paying for. Instead of a pile of resumes, a talent pipeline is a list of qualified candidates that have each shared their background, skills, career goals and and interests with a Recruiter and those things line up with your company’s ideal candidate profile.

Building a talent pipeline is a shift from reactive recruiting to proactive recruiting, or recruiting in advance of your hiring needs. So instead of waiting until a position opens or is vacated, you work to fill future openings with talent that is a fit for your business. It means that when you have a new job open or an employee leaves, you can tap your talent pipeline to fill your jobs faster. That’s how a talent pipeline improves your recruiting process.

What is a passive job candidate?

April 8th, 2016

Just about anyone in a company may have to recruit at some point in their career, but if you’re not entrenched in the world of talent acquisition, you may not be up to speed on all recruiting jargon. Like “passive candidate” for example.  Recruiters are not making a judgement call about a candidate’s personality, instead they are categorizing them based on who is seeking who.

what-is-passive-job-candidateGoogle offers a great definition: A passive candidate (passive job candidate) is someone who is being considered for a position but is not actively searching for a job.

An active candidate, on the other hand, is someone searching for a job. They are on the job boards, going to networking events, emailing recruiters and applying to open jobs. In that case, the candidate is actively seeking a new job. For passive candidates, it’s the recruiters who found them. A recruiter came across information about a person or found their online job profile and thinks they are a great fit for a certain job and/or company. In this case, the recruiter is seeking the candidate.

Passive candidates are often considered to be higher quality candidates, but they can also be more difficult to engage and convince to make a career move. As the economy shifts back and forth from an employer’s market to a candidate’s market, the number of active candidates ebbs and flows. LinkedIn reports that “Passive talent accounts for 79% of working professionals around the world.” Regardless of whether or not passive talent is better or not, targeting passive candidates should always be a part of your recruiting strategy, especially for rare & hard-to-fill roles. Here’s a few suggestions for how to catch the attention of A+ talent that ignores you.

Need help attracting top talent?

Recruitment-Assessment

 

 

Outside-In® Book List

Review-Us-Blog-02
© Year CBI Group. All Rights Reserved. Site Credits.