Game of Jobs: Talent is Coming

April 23rd, 2014

If you look at the numbers in TV and talent of late, it’s clear to see that a lot more people are watching Game of Thrones (#1 download this week of all TV!) Who can blame them? It’s like General Hospital in the middle ages with enough family, fighting, war, and drunkenness to satisfy everyone.

GoT-LogoAnother key insight is that there is a new, more modern war for King’s Landing brewing. This is apparent in the US talent numbers, too. It’s just going to take a little longer for all of us to really notice. Job creation is way up for four straight months, bubbling up in the 40,000 range consistently. The 121,000 announced large reductions in force for the first quarter of 2014 are a 19-year low! And private employment is up, up, and up. Temporary staffing, services, hospitality, technical roles, IT, you name it.

However, no one is talking about it. Unemployment has remained flat. There is an interesting thing about public perception. All perceptions take time to change. I propose that it takes a good six months for the general public to change a perspective. Perhaps you’re always late for work. Everyone in the office knows it. Now suppose you work to change that perspective. And you come in diligently on time or even early! But I bet few will notice. You will still be known as the character that arrives late—for a long, long time. Over time perceptions change. People take notice. Others comment. Someone might even make a joke or compliment you for your efforts. Eventually being late is nothing more than a memory.

In the war for talent our economy has putted along for so long, far from roaring and not quite stopped cold like a Stark at a Red Wedding. Our common understanding is of recession and slower business times. Businesses are doing just OK. Big Companies are hoarding cash for the next growth opportunity. Yes, the stock market is doing well but that is for rich people, right? Or that is my retirement. That does not make my day-to-day life easier or put more money in my pocket. This common view has impacted careers and work systems. Today’s hiring managers have had so many choices from which to hire people, that they still believe it. That perhaps they can always hire slowly. They can always hire who they want. Even offer them salaries or whatever they might want.

Todays Game of Jobs is shifting right before our eyes. Fifteen years ago pundits predicted a talent war around right now. This was a long-term view based on the supply and demand of talent. That there simply were not enough or the right kind of workers available. That this would be a great time to be employed and that this is going to happen. Every day we talk to employers who have an aging workforce; a workforce of allied health workers or of pipefitters and tradespeople that simply cannot be replaced fast enough.

So if you think power changes hands fast with recent Game of Thrones episodes. Well, some day soon the workers will have control and families like the Lannisters will no longer have the advantage as the employer!

Image courtesy of hbo.com.

Do you SEE, THINK, and ACT?

April 16th, 2014

Big data is Everything. Analytics are King. Business leaders have more information at their fingertips today than ever before. However, with all these reports, databases, spreadsheets, and software systems, you would think that being a leader is a piece of cake. We have more information, yet we may have too much information.

If you went to college for undergraduate studies or an advanced degree there were/are many tools, theories and ideas on decision making. Perhaps we have so many ways of making decisions that it makes decision making, well, harder than ever. Should we use a SWOT for that? Or a decision-based flow chart? Or maybe channel Ben Franklin with a list of pros and cons? Go ahead Google it. I got 599 million pages of articles, books, blogs and models all on decision making!

Have you ever been the leader that takes over a job, a department, maybe even a whole company? So many expect you to set the tone and direction. It takes time, intuition, meetings with employees, and customers to get a sense of things that are good and things that need fixing. The idea of making big, important, strategic decisions sounds better in theory than actually doing it. And I propose there is a basic fundamental reason why.

ID-10091482Decision making is not easy. Let’s start with the basics:

1.  Trust your gut.  If you have ever noticed that reaction or feeling you have about a key issue or topic, and perhaps later you realized you were right?  Learn to react to your insights.

2.  When you’re not sure—talk to customers. I am not sure much needs to be said about this one other than time with customers is energizing. And this can free your thought process about where you need to better serve your customers and your business.

3.  Keep at it, but keep it simple. When I was first learning to lead I was taught three simple words for decision making: SEE, THINK, and ACT.

If you pull back and think about it, most of us try to ACT too quickly. We don’t look at all of the reports and data. We don’t meet with customers and employees. We want to make the decision to simply make it go away or to enjoy the rush.

However, what all leaders really need to do is work with their teams to make the best decisions. This is probably not the easy one. Nor the first one. We need to SEE all there is to see.Then we need to spend some time THINKING about it. And then we ACT.

So this week someone is going to bring you a problem or opportunity. Are you willing to SEE, THINK, and ACT in that order? Or will you get stuck in the information gathering phase? Or perhaps skip all that and dole out yesterdays answer. It is up to every leader to respond uniquely and differently to each days events.

4 Things The Avengers Taught Me About Talent Acquisition

April 9th, 2014

By Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewski

TAMarvel2Anyone and everyone in the industry knows that finding superhero talent is rare and extremely hard to do. When looking for new talent you need to ensure that their skillset can coincide with the team and work together to fulfill the purpose of the business. Each member of your team must bring a unique expertise that ultimately strives for the success of the organization and the growth of the company.

Here are some things to remember when looking beyond masks and capes:

1. Superhero powers are rendered useless if not harnessed and executed properly. Nobody wants a hulk candidate smashing everything in sight, or an archer that cannot master the skill to hit a target. It’s important to look for talent that not only meets the skill requirement, but also has the proven ability to use said skills in action. Screen for specifics and ask for examples of a time your candidate used these skills to overcome common obstacles in your industry.

2. Resumes can be deceiving. Sure, they graduated top of their class from MIT and have two master’s degrees under their armor prior to the age of 19. That doesn’t mean the man behind the iron is the right person for your team or a cultural fit for your company. Face to face interviews with the entire staff are crucial. Bring them into your office and see how they interact with every single person in the company and try to weed out any signs of evil.

3. Candidates must be up to date on all technology and facets of your industry. Although your super serum-enhanced candidate can wield a shield and have an unprecedented patriotism toward your company, they may have been asleep for the last 70 years when it comes to current technology and practices. Whatever your industry, it’s important to troll for candidates that are ahead of the game and know “the next best thing.” If your stellar candidate is slightly lacking in this category, make sure that they have the willingness and drive to learn quickly.

4. Always be comfortable with being in BETA. A company’s work is never “finished”. Look for candidates who can wear multiple suits and focus towards creating a 2.0 improved version. Businesses boom when employees are superhuman and innovative. Troll for candidates with diverse backgrounds within your industry and you can bet on an unstoppable force of business growth and development.

You don’t need Charles Xavier or Cerebro to locate your next talent. At Outside-In® Companies, we offer Blank Sheet of Paper Recruitment Solutions that are completely customizable for your needs! We can help you.

What is Your Personal Operating Philosophy?

April 2nd, 2014

Although each of us has one, few of us have ever sat down to work on it. Yet it still exists and your operating philosophy is at play all of the time. How do you react to people and situations? How do your beliefs impact how you act and perhaps even how you interact with the world around you. Your series of beliefs are your operating philosophy.

Trust me, even if you think you do not have one you do. So we all have a choice to make here to determine our philosophy. People do not know themselves. They know they don’t necessarily like dishonesty or rudeness or folks that lack direction or purpose in their lives. But knowing these things for yourself. Well I think in business and as a talent expert I see all kinds of people who simply have not taken the time to decide who they are and what they stand for. Imagine a culturally led organization asking culture-based questions to folks that don’t know their own culture? Hard to find a match.

So how do you go about defining yours? A business has an operating philosophy that defines in many different ways. Things like a mission statement, values or culture, even things like a purpose define the operating philosophy. They work hard to answer the basic questions of what a business does, why it exists, and how it goes about doing its business. I get asked this everyday as a business owner. And an answer I must give.

As people we have a choice. Are we half full or half empty? Are we reactive or proactive? Are we going to be friendly or nasty? Each of us needs to determine what we stand for and believe in.

ISTJ2I help people refine their personal operating philosophy by asking the following questions:

  • Brainstorm leaders in your community and famous people. What is that you admire about them?

  • Think of who you admire most. Then determine why.

  • Find an assessment tool like Disc, Strengthfinders, Myers-Briggs, or other tools for self-reflection and thinking.

Most important of all is to do some thinking about what the world needs from you. If we truly control our reaction to the world, we get to decide what we put out to the world, right? So the real answer is to define your thinking about your attitudes, beliefs, and values. And be able to talk about them.

So what is your operating philosophy?

Seasons: The Ultimate Agent of Change

March 26th, 2014

Spring is finally here. The temperature and my yard still look like winter; however, we can count on seasonal change. Ironically, we tend to look forward to this change. This winter is easy to forget as we all long for the warm sun and time outside! When the heat of Summer rolls in we will long for cool breezes and crisp Fall days! We accept these changes and embrace them. Why do we not accept other changes?

agent-badgeWith today’s world evolving and shifting right before us, I know most employees struggle with the notion of being an agent of change. Sometimes we all long for normalcy, safety, and just a little status quo. We find comfort in routine and the familiar. However, this is not really the way the world of work stays for long. I believe today’s worker has begun to romanticize the notion of being an agent of change. We all want to believe that we will be the ones that smile in the face of adversity, that take the bad news head on, that are willing to do whatever is asked of in order to live this value. Though truth be told, change is hard. We might have to give up tasks and duties we like and that give us energy. We might even have to take on new tasks that are brand new and unfamiliar, that we might struggle to grasp and master. As employees we might even do things we are not good at and never, ever saw ourselves doing. And when faced with change in reality your response can be very different than perhaps you want or even planned. Reactions to change are personal, unique, and ultimately up to the individual.

I have lived this first hand. Entrepreneurial founders face many crossroads and business challenges. During the “great recession” I found myself cleaning our offices on the weekends. I was also thrust back into leading, selling, and managing in a way I did not have to do for many years. We always have a choice with change. I actually fought it for too long. I ignored the recession, reacted slowly, we kept fighting, but we were not embracing the real realities of the new economy and its impact on our services and the marketplace.

Our goal at the Outside-In® Companies with change? To teach, discuss, equip, lead, educate, and work on our knowledge of the topic of change. We make it a value to remind us of our desire to be change-makers. We want our customers to envy our adaptive and flexible mindset. We want it to be an edge that we use daily to take advantage of business opportunities. And as a feature in working with us that provides our customers a one of a kind benefit. We find that our customers need to drive change and it is very hard work, but a partner that lives, breathes, and eats change seems to make their transition easier and less painful!

To be a true agent you must do more than be willing to be adaptive in your job and to the role you play in your company.  A true change agent seeks to understand why change is absolutely necessary to begin with.  Change is not just happening to you; change is constant for a business.  A business and its leaders must be making adjustments at all times, balancing goals with results, the external marketplace with internal resources, etc.  A company with a real advantage has to do less work convincing and influencing staff why change is necessary.  And gets to spend more time being productive!

Outside-In® Ubiquity

March 19th, 2014

Last year we realized that Outside-In® Companies have done much work to achieve our written and stated purpose. You see, we like a purpose because it is more actionable than a mission statement. I hope you don’t care for mission statements—they get put on lobby walls and above doors of conference rooms, but are not often talked about or brought to life. I am not sure what consultancy started to charge tens of thousands of dollars to Corporate America sometime in the 80s, but they should have to give their money back. In fact, most are not active in the day-to-day lives of the typical employee. Committees write them, yet no one understands them. And it’s easy to know why, they are just a bunch of jargon and buzzword-filled statements that impress but have no real purpose. In fact, most mission statements don’t seem to make any sense and are foolish, even!

purposeNow, purpose–this is why I hope you bolt out of bed every morning and get excited about what you’re doing. (Of course you love your job and career, right?) All of us at times need to think in longer terms, say 10-15 years in order to achieve and dream. Creating a big future and broader meaning for being are critical to culture and the experience that your employees and customers feel when they are a part of your organization. This is what drives you through thick and thin. And it is why I am writing this story. A purpose needs to be talked about, be actionable, and be alive and well in every single meeting. There is little coincidence that we use the word ubiquity in our purpose. We want our purpose everywhere, every place, all of the time. And everyday we bolt of bed to climb the Outside-In®  Mt. Everest. We put it out there for others to use. Now we need to get inside people and create a doctrine of beliefs that people can find useful to making their lives better and more fulfilled!

We have always wanted to get Outside-In® to become a household name in business. We registered the trademark in 2004. We wanted to encourage its use and not litigate, defend, or protect our claim. To me, the greatest form of flattery was when the national business magazine, or local technology blog used Outside-In® in a way that described customer-centered thinking and a culture that is, in essence, built around the customer.

I have a shelf full of books and an electronic database of references to our precious, Outside-In® moniker. Here’s four:

Getting Outside-In® in everyday language was fun. This was hard work. This is still a vibrant goal.  But we wanted to think bigger and differently about the next ten years. To us, Outside-In® is about our values and how they can play a role in our lives as employees, as parents, as neighbors and siblings, frankly all of life’s roles. We started to think that perhaps our new purpose is about showing everyone that Outside-In® Ubiquity is quite possibly the best thought we ever had. We started to hear from employees that they were taking our values home and into their personal lives. That they helped show the teenager the value of homework, that they improved relationships with neighbors—that our values were becoming ubiquitous. This makes a lot of sense. If you hire for values you have employees that generally came there for those congruent reasons. If we are rewarded, recognized, and appraised consistently against these values then the purpose becomes more like an Outside-In® tattoo. It is forever omnipresent in our lives.

Addicted to Dope: 4 Chemicals We Need to Feel Fulfilled at Work

March 5th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewski

1. Dopamine

dopeDopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine for my nerds) is the human chemical responsible for releasing good feelings of satisfaction, achievement, and completion. If you’re anything like me, every item you cross out on your to-do list summons the invisible arms of progress as they comfort you in their warm embrace. Ahhh. Instant gratification. A hug so fulfilling you find yourself craving, no, needing more. You can quit anytime you want, right? Don’t quit. Goonies never say die!

Two weeks ago, I attended a Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce networking event where TED celebrity, leadership expert, and completely awesome dude extraordinaire, Simon Sinek spoke about the four social chemicals humans need in order to feel fulfilled. This goes all the way back to our monkey roots in the Paleolithic era when human survival was dependent on hunting and gathering so these built in survival chemicals encouraged us to succeed. Although we’re well past knuckle-walking and spearing wild boar, dinosaurs, or whatever, all of these chemicals are still present in our daily work lives. And these drugs are biologically what motivate us to set goals, complete tasks, and to keep going under all circumstances.

2. Endorphins

How about that feeling you get when you run a few miles, lift weights, or complete a P90X® workout without passing out? Hel-lo sweet, sweet endorphins—the personal opiate. Often referred to as the “runner’s high”, endorphins sole purpose are to mask physical pain with pleasure. During a rough patch at work, endorphins are what kick in to give you that “all hands on deck” instinct to overcome and obtain that feel-good high. Laughing is one of the quickest ways to release endorphins, explaining why it is highly encouraged to participate in some lighthearted humor during tense times.

3. Serotonin

So what happens when you shatter those goals? Complete those tasks and exceed expectations? Serotonin rolls out a red carpet and hands you a trophy. Serotonin gives us pride, the feeling of being respected, and an invincible attitude. In work life, serotonin is what emboldens us to put out the best work we can in order to feel acknowledged and valuable. It’s what pushes us to constantly impress and please those around us so we can feel a sense of achievement and comradery. Think about how you would feel running on your own time versus running a marathon in front of people cheering you on. Serotonin pushes us to go further, be stronger, and work harder.

4. Oxytocin

What about the warm fuzzies? The most popular of these chemicals, oxytocin, is correlated with feelings of friendship, love, and trust. Oxytocin provides us with the need for human connection, social interaction, and vigilante actions. Unlike the other three chemicals, oxytocin is a long-lasting feeling. This chemical is all about relationship building and creating a deep trust for those around us in order to feel safe and protected. At work, oxytocin is the feeling we achieve when our colleagues are there to watch our backs, encourage our growth, and give us the tools we need to succeed.

Simon Sinek’s Leaders Eat Last: Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t is currently on the New York Times Best Seller List. You should buy it not only because it’s a thought-provoking look into the way we work as humans, in teams, and as leaders, but also because I said so.

The “No Flip” Entrepreneur

February 26th, 2014

Most entrepreneurs aren’t trying to create a technology revolution with an innovation that advances society in some unique way. That is just what the media reports because it makes for better articles. Imagine the impact of the twenty-something changing the world and selling it quickly for lots of money. Impressive for sure. And I imagine important in some way to our economy. Don’t get me wrong, I embrace technology as a tool in my business. Over 13 years, 52 quarters, and 156 months, I have operated and ran my company. I went into the details there for a reason. Most of us do not build our companies to flip them. Very few have goals to get Venture Capital or Institutional monies invested into their business. Even fewer have high hopes of an IPO.

smallgiantsMy goal was to run my company for nine years. This was in my first business plan. (Which, by the way, was 88 pages long!) Call it my Jerry Maguire version of the talent industry. The nine years were set to give me time to build it, boot strap it, grow it, sell it, and cash out. Then something happened. Call it life I guess. Time went by, we began to receive awards, and employees came and employees went. Markets changed for our services so we adapted and responded with new ones. The Economy roared and then spurted almost to a stop—Ironically in year eight! So, plans are set for a reason. Plans drive a stake in the ground. And when you get there you start all over again.

One of my mentors who runs a national consulting company once challenged me on my nine year plan, “Chris, do you like your company? Does it provide for you and your family as well as your employees? Do you serve customers that count on you?” Then he added, “Why not have it both ways? Enjoy and celebrate what you have accomplished and always work on making it better.”

I would rather focus on how my company or my customers can be profitable, create a measurable Outside-In® experience, and maintain a values based environment and culture that is unique, even quirky in its efforts to be authentic.

I want to have a “boring” company. Predictable revenues. Managed growth. I want to maintain a caring environment that not only focuses on the health and vitality of the culture, but also develops the discipline and practices to have a well-executed business strategy.

There are many entrepreneurial leaders out there that are in it for the long haul. We have worked long and hard to get our business’s out of the proverbial garage and into something relevant in our industries. We are Small Giants, forces to be reckoned with that don’t feel the need to sell out to be the biggest, but instead, choose to be the greatest.

Boiling Down the State of People in the Clinical/Scientific Industry

February 24th, 2014

Jobs and People by the Numbers

BioScience-Job-GrowthBased on the numbers in our infographic below (scroll down to take a look!), we know that number of jobs in the Clinical/Scientific Industry have been increasing, predicted to be at 97% of peak levels in 2014, and also anticipated to continue to grow through to 2022 by 10%. STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) occupations will continue to remain center stage, with more than one in four employers (26%) planning to create jobs in these areas over the next 12 months.

We also know that clinical/scientific jobs are at the top of the list of skillsets for which employers need help finding qualified potentials. And that 60% of CFO’s say it is somewhat or very challenging to find skilled candidates for professional-level positions today.

Finally, when it comes to workers, we know that more professionals are seeking new jobs in 2014 than they have been in prior years since the recession. While various sources present drastically different percentages of workers that will look for a new job this year, they report that in 2014 the percentage is greater than it has been since the recession. Our sources also note that workers are more optimistic about the outlook of the coming year.

CareerBuilder states that, “A drop in job satisfaction may account for the expected rise in turnover.” The percentage of workers that are satisfied with their jobs dropped from 66% in 2013 to 59% this year; and those that are dissatisfied rose from 15% last year to 18% in 2014. The top reasons cited for dissatisfaction are salary (66%) and not feeling valued (65%).

So, how can we boil all this down?

At the Outside-In® Companies, we see these numbers in action daily while serving our customers in the pharmaceutical and bioscience industries. More companies are hiring for positions so demand is high, which makes recruiting quality candidates more difficult. With this shortage of people, companies have to be creative in their recruiting. So taking advantage of the positive outlook both c-suite executives AND workers have for the coming year, how can employers identify and win over great candidates?

Here are five tips for your company to consider:

Marketing Your Company: Workers may feel optimistic about the coming year, however they won’t take the decision to jump jobs lightly. Your company needs to market itself to potential candidates so they become aware of who you are and what makes you so great. Understand that this is a long-term investment, that changing the market’s perception of you will take time and you won’t see the pay off immediately. In many cases, the market doesn’t know about you, doesn’t know much about you, or they think negative things about you – so focus on increasing your brand’s awareness and generating a positive impression on people so they want to work for you.

Beef-up Your Employee Referral Program: Your employees already work for you for one reason or another, which makes them some of your best assets! Encourage your people to bring their friends on board – they are likely to have similar interests and similar values that will fit in with your culture. You can encourage employees by simply asking them to refer people they know for current openings, but also consider how you can “pay” people for their efforts. Many companies offer bonuses when employees’ referrals are hired, or when the person sticks around for 6 months. Good employee referral programs are often the top source of hiring!

Perk Up Your Benefits: Sure, people may be considering switching jobs this year, but with salary and “feeling valued” at the top of the list for dissatisfaction, they need to know that they will be getting better benefits in a new job. How does your compensation compare to your competition? How does your culture recognize its people? “Offering frequent recognition, merit bonuses, training programs and clearly defined career paths are important ways to show workers what they mean to the company,” said Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources for CareerBuilder. In this market, the candidates are calling the shots – so what do you have to offer them that is shinier than what they currently have?

Consider Temps and Independent Contractors: The Bureau of Labor Statistics released on February 7th that there were 2.78 million contract and temp workers in the temporary help services industry in the U.S. 2.78 million is the largest number of temps in the workforce ever. More workers are pursuing contract work or being independent consultants, so consider bringing quality candidates in as independent contractors. The world is going temp, so this is likely a good option for bringing in the best people for the job.

Location, Location, RELOCATION:
With a shortage of quality applicants and trouble finding the right people, your company might want to consider relocation. By expanding your search outside your geographic region, you can easily increase your candidate pool. You’ll want to look back at tip #3 to help convince people to make such a move to work for you, but it’s probably worth it so you don’t have to keep scratching your head looking at the same resumes again and again.

Infographic – Presenting the Numbers

CBI Way: 5 Ways to Go Back to the Future of Sourcing

February 18th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewskibacktofuture

Grab those Nike power laces and your hoverboard, this blog’s about to go 88mph back to the future of sourcing. There’s no hiding from it—we live in a society where today’s technologies are tomorrow’s artifacts. We are spoiled by technology that is meant to make our lives easier but inherently makes us disconnected from interpersonal communication. Gone are the days of needles in the haystack, purple squirrels, and cold calls. The future of sourcing is all about genuine relationships, honest networking, and full engagement. Here are some tips and tricks to become a more proactive and efficient sourcer in a world that is rapidly changing. (Spoiler alert, Marty McFly: They might not be what you think!)

  • Be Engaged: Engagement is the word of the year, and I’m not talkin’ carats. (Although, if my future husband is reading this, here’s a hint: 1 carat princess cut pave.) Back to the topic. There are countless articles teaching readers how to be more engaged in both their work and personal lives. I’ve even read The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal to learn more about this popular topic only to find that I was certainly not as engaged as I had thought. Think about investing your energy rather than your time. After all, your time is worthless if you’re not giving it your full attention. So drink that Vitamin C, get off your smartphone, and devote your full attention to your candidate!
  • Know Your Brand. Be Your Brand: Are you considered an “All-Star Recruiter” via LinkedIn? So is the guy to your left. And the one to the right. In a world where a million recruiters are flooding the inboxes of candidates with stereotypical messages, how do you stand out? What’s your Unique Selling Proposition? Remember that you’re representing your company and that you’re an extension of its brand, an embodiment if you will. This one probably sounds like a given, but too many recruiters come across as phony or robotic and it’s important to distance yourself from that stigma and be authentic and genuine. Seriously. Take mom’s advice and just be yourself.
  • Value Quality > Quantity: Anyone can tell you that it’s in your long-term interest to reach out to 10 dream candidates rather than 100 so-so’s whose resumes contain one measly keyword of your search. However, many recruiters find themselves disregarding this practice simply because it’s easier and they want to yield high numbers. Use your time wisely and harbor sincere interactions with stellar candidates. You’ll be thanking yourself when the next job order comes in and you already have an A+ pool to choose from.
  • Build Relationships: How many quality candidates have you sourced today? Big deal. This week? Zzz. Can you list their names? All of them? Probably not. Make your candidates feel valuable—don’t treat them like another billable to fill a position. Think about how you would want to be treated. You should be having consistent, responsive interactions with candidates that help you climb that relational ladder. Be open and transparent throughout the process—take the time to get to know each candidate and their personality. This will help you tremendously in finding the right fit for both your candidate and client. Also, be sure to follow up with each candidate!
  • Keep Up with Technology (1.21 Gigawatts!): While in the beginning I mentioned being spoiled by technology, I didn’t mean throw it away altogether! Find your perfect balance of using today’s best sources to build genuine relationships. The technology world as we know it is changing rapidly—how will you adapt? As we have learned from the dinosaurs, you either evolve or you are reduced to only being a three year old’s birthday party theme. It doesn’t take a DeLorean to stay current with sourcing strategies, technologies, and best practices. All you have to do is stay active by consistent training and searching for invaluable information. Spend a little bit of time each with with a cup of coffee and a couple sourcing blogs & articles. Trust me, a little goes a long way. Find something good? Be sure to share it with your team! You’ll actually be saving time in the long run AND you’ll be well ahead of the game.

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices. 

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