What is a pipeline of candidates?

April 27th, 2016

A common definition: A pipeline of candidates also referred to as a ‘candidate pipeline’ or ‘talent pipeline‘ is a pool of candidates who are qualified to assume open positions when they are created or vacated through retirement, promotion, or someone leaving the company.

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To clear up any misconceptions of what a candidate pipeline is, let’s discuss what a pipeline of candidates is not.

A pipeline of candidates is not…

  1. A Resume Database: Any company with an Applicant Tracking System or file of resumes collected over time technically has a ‘database of candidates.’ Likely those same candidates sent their resume to other companies, which means just having the resume isn’t worth much of anything. Has anyone qualified those candidates or built relationships with the people behind the resumes? Without at least a phone screen, a batch of resumes is no more helpful than a pile of blank paper.
  2. A Static, On-call List of Candidates: In the world of recruiting, you’re not buying a thing, you’re buying a person. People have wants and needs, and they often change and evolve. People are promoted, switch jobs, change paths, have different priorities, etc., etc. It’s important to stay in touch with candidates and move people on and off the list of qualified candidates. If you’re buying a pipeline of candidates, you should expect that a Recruitment Consultant is staying in touch with the humans on the list and updating the talent pipeline.
  3. An Exclusive Access Pass to Top Talent: No recruiter has ‘a list of people that no one has. LinkedIn is public and the world is small. Lists may be different but don’t expect that your money can buy something that the company down the street can’t.

Now that we’ve cleared that up, I hope you’ve also learned that developing a pipeline of candidates takes time and requires consistent relationship building. This is what makes a ‘list of names’ investing the time in or worth paying for. Instead of a pile of resumes, a talent pipeline is a list of qualified candidates that have each shared their background, skills, career goals and and interests with a Recruiter and those things line up with your company’s ideal candidate profile.

Building a talent pipeline is a shift from reactive recruiting to proactive recruiting, or recruiting in advance of your hiring needs. So instead of waiting until a position opens or is vacated, you work to fill future openings with talent that is a fit for your business. It means that when you have a new job open or an employee leaves, you can tap your talent pipeline to fill your jobs faster. That’s how a talent pipeline improves your recruiting process.

Time is Leading Recruiting Challenge for Healthcare Employers

April 20th, 2016

Solving recruitment and talent acquisition problems can be, to say the least, challenging — particularly in the healthcare industry, where there’s such a shortage of talent. But what is keeping healthcare recruiting teams from solving talent problems? Time-Healthcare-Recruiting-ChallengeAccording to CareerBuilder’s Pulse of Health Care Survey, 45% of health care employers cited a lack of time as the greatest factor preventing them from solving challenges in their recruitment process.

Here are a few simple strategies that aren’t time consuming to improve your recruitment process:

Job Description: Overhauling a job description or summary can make a great difference in attracting talent to your open roles. Most descriptions are very similar and therefore looked over. It’s important to create excitement in the simplest form of marketing for your job; the description.

Application process: Think simple. Does everyone involved in your process need to be involved? Could your team shorten the initial phone screen? According to OfficeVibe, 60% of candidates have quit an application process because it took too long.

Get help: Often, identifying the right talent is the biggest pain point of the recruitment process. Without talent, there is no recruiting or talent acquisition. Outsourcing your sourcing and talent pipelining to experts could grant you the extra time to focus on solving other problems in the process.

Address your recruiting challenges today.

Recruitment-Assessment

Why Networking Pays Off for the Best Candidates

April 14th, 2016

In thinking about what sets the best candidates apart from the average ones, here’s why networking pays off for the best candidates, but doesn’t work for the average ones.

The best candidates understand that networking is not an event. Instead, it’s something you do with regularity, like the slow and steady drip of the coffee pot each and every morning. Networking is not what you do when you’re unemployed and looking for your next gig. Or something you do when you’re in sales and your need to reach your monthly sales quota… The world we sees you coming, you need something, right? Well, you’re the last person the room wants to meet.

best-candidates-networkThe best candidates can network because they do it consistently in their company, in their industry and in their local marketplace. They know networking helps address many professional needs at one time. That networking allows you to learn from others. And is a way to meet people (and for people can meet you). Yes,  relational capital. Check out Ed Wallace, The Relational Ladder for more good stuff on that!

The best candidates build relationships with the people they meet, which leads to opportunities to help/serve/do something for others. It is in this act of service that the best candidates distinguish themselves. When you know someone, you can build trust, respect and even like them. And the best candidates learn to accumulate these relationships and develop a network of connections that have been cultivated to develop mutual benefit and gain.  The more a good candidate networks and serves, the more the they can count on their network to reciprocate.

To be the best candidate, practice these simple steps:

  • Network like clock work (harder than it sounds).
  • Serve the needs of others.
  • Practice the “accumulation and time effects” — network a little all of the time forever.
  • Do more for your network than you ask of it.
  • Live by a mantra of trust, credibility and value creation:
    • Be trustworthy— make your word mean something with impeccable follow through.
    • Have credibility— Give back to your network with what you know and who you know.
    • Ask yourself, am I creating value for people in my network?

So yes, the best candidates are great at networking.  And they are in demand because of it.  These candidates can land any coffee meet up or job they want in their network. How do I know? Think of the best candidates, they usually fit this mold!

What is a passive job candidate?

April 8th, 2016

Just about anyone in a company may have to recruit at some point in their career, but if you’re not entrenched in the world of talent acquisition, you may not be up to speed on all recruiting jargon. Like “passive candidate” for example.  Recruiters are not making a judgement call about a candidate’s personality, instead they are categorizing them based on who is seeking who.

what-is-passive-job-candidateGoogle offers a great definition: A passive candidate (passive job candidate) is someone who is being considered for a position but is not actively searching for a job.

An active candidate, on the other hand, is someone searching for a job. They are on the job boards, going to networking events, emailing recruiters and applying to open jobs. In that case, the candidate is actively seeking a new job. For passive candidates, it’s the recruiters who found them. A recruiter came across information about a person or found their online job profile and thinks they are a great fit for a certain job and/or company. In this case, the recruiter is seeking the candidate.

Passive candidates are often considered to be higher quality candidates, but they can also be more difficult to engage and convince to make a career move. As the economy shifts back and forth from an employer’s market to a candidate’s market, the number of active candidates ebbs and flows. LinkedIn reports that “Passive talent accounts for 79% of working professionals around the world.” Regardless of whether or not passive talent is better or not, targeting passive candidates should always be a part of your recruiting strategy, especially for rare & hard-to-fill roles. Here’s a few suggestions for how to catch the attention of A+ talent that ignores you.

Need help attracting top talent?

Recruitment-Assessment

 

 

Most Will Find their Next Job Through Networking

March 23rd, 2016

Networking Is RecruitingThe largest % of the workforce will find their next job through networking. That’s right. People are more likely to land their next position through the people that they know. And this is proven true time and time again, at any level and for any role. Technology and social media are not replacements for talking to the people you know about your job search, instead they enable you to do it even better.

Let’s think this through from a recruiting perspective.

Are your managers meeting with people and networking to fill their own roles? If not, they are missing out on building their own bench of talent. How do you think recruiters and recruiting firms (like mine) find talent, anyway? We network all of the time! That is what real recruitment is all about; meeting talent in your community and finding the players you want to put on your virtual bench for your next hiring need! With constant networking, jobs get filled faster. Average talent is replaced.  And better talent is attracted over time!

If you haven’t caught on yet, I am stating that the best companies fill their roles when leaders and employees view recruitment as part of their core job, on top of what their HR and talent acquisition teams are doing. Recruiting is much faster when leaders are networking — both for business and for hiring. And when they meet with the talent in their community, well in advance of their need. What does this look like? This is where managers accept coffee meetings from candidates that network with them, even if they don’t have a current job opening. Where your team goes to lunch with competitors or attends industry events to meet others in your field/industry.

So, hiring managers — do as the best staffing firms do; get out from behind your desk and meet folks. All of the time. Build a bench of relationships. Your company (and your recruiters) will thank you!

Next up: Why the best candidate can network and average ones can’t!

 

Engaging Quality Candidates

March 16th, 2016

Attract-engage-talentLast month we examined the preference of sourcing quality over quantity. The catch; however, is that those quality, and often passive candidates, are far more difficult to engage from a sourcing perspective. In turn, approaching engagement with quality candidates strategically can differentiate you from the market and land you the top talent you or your client seek.

So what can you do to separate yourself from the competition?

  1. Be specific and creative: Take the time to research your target’s experience and their footprint. Knowing where the candidate has worked, where they went to school, or what their personal interests are could go a long way in gaining his or her trust as a recruiting partner.
  2. Focus on the opportunity and growth: Put the focus on the talent. Show your expertise in the details about the opportunity and what making a move could mean long-term for your candidate. It’s not just a new job, it could be a crucial progression in a their career, taking he or she to new heights.
  3. Build Relationships: It can be easy to simply sell the job and your company to active candidates who are looking to make a move. On the other hand, passive candidates will need more convincing to even have a conversation. Find out what he or she would be open to hearing about before presenting the opportunity. Try delving into likes and dislikes about their current role, positioning yourself as a consultant, while conveying your industry knowledge and the current state of the market.

Looking for help with your talent strategy?

Recruitment-Assessment

Being Creative with Your Recruiting Model

March 9th, 2016

What is the best way to find talent for your business?

If I had to sum up a talent acquisition manager’s job, it would be with that question. The people responsible for recruiting in 2016 face the challenge of attracting quality applicants in a candidate’s market, keeping up with hiring demands, and ensuring all this work is on budget. You’re expected to have a streamlined recruiting process with consistent candidate messaging representing your employer brand, and you need to optimize that process for each skill set using targeted and up-to-date tools and methods. Easy day in the life, right?

The competitive market is putting talent acquisition at the top of the business’ strategic goals. If you’re struggling with the best way to find talent for your business in any capacity, it’s time to get creative with your recruiting model.

So, what’s the first step?

The first thing you need to do is identifying the business challenge. To create an effective recruitment solution, first you need to uncover the true source of your recruiting woes. Where’s the gap? What are you struggling with most? Maybe you’ve got a streamlined process and a great employer brand but are not having success finding quality candidates for a specific skill set like sales, IT or healthcare. Perhaps you need better job profiles. Or maybe, it’s not clear or obvious to you.

I’ve identified by recruiting challenge, now what?

Once you know what you need to fix, it makes it easier to build a solution. The first option is an obvious one – if you can identify the problem, you may be able to solve it in-house. But when you can’t identify the problem or don’t know how to fix it, there are lots of options for getting creative with your recruiting model. When it comes to working with recruiting providers for your direct hire roles, you can:

  • Find a full-cycle recruiting partner for help for one position.
  • Hand over all of your hiring from start to finish.
  • Break up recruiting by the skill sets you hire or by geographic regions.
  • Unbundle the recruiting process to get help in one area like sourcing or screening.
  • Bring in on-demand help for projects like opening up a new office/branch or launching a new product.
  • Blend any of the above!

Building a Recruiting Solution

With the complicated and diverse nature of recruitment challenges, creative solutions will help meet hiring objectives. If you’re interested in a free recruitment assessment to identify your recruiting challenge, connect with CBI Group today.

Recruitment-Assessment

 

When to Use an Executive Search Firm

March 1st, 2016

When to use an executive search firmWith every hire, companies have the choice to “stay in house” or outsource to a recruiting company. But how do you know where to draw that line? When should you call on a recruiting agency? This article explores seven scenarios when investing in a search firm is a good idea. And while our companies offer many outsourced recruitment models, this blog examines traditional executive search, also commonly referred to as headhunting.

  1. The Most Obvious. Most often, employers call on an executive search firm for really important roles, especially c-suite or executive leadership roles like CEO, CFO, CTO, CHRO, etc. Not only are leadership positions crucial to the success of the business, but it’s helpful to have a 3rd party perspective to avoid blind hiring (sometimes internal team members see only what they want to see).
  2. Underwater Basket Weavers. In addition to executive-level positions, some companies offer such a unique product or service that they require rare skill sets that are essential for driving core, strategic areas of the business. Pop culture may refer to these candidates as unicorns, we call them Underwater Basket Weavers because, well, how many of those are there out there?! Executive recruiters are used to developing a strategy for finding these ‘needle in a haystack’ candidates.
  3. The Search for the Best. Recruiting is one of those things that anybody can do. Just about anyone can find a person to do a job. But if you’re looking for the ideal candidate who will check all the boxes, you need to work with someone who really knows what they are doing. And executive recruiters generally are the best of the best at what they do and will help you find the best candidate, instead of just any candidate.
  4. You’ve tried, but have not had success. Either you have an active search that has been open too long or you’ve used up your knowledge and recruiting tricks and aren’t sure what to do next. Working with a recruiter opens up your pool of candidates beyond your network.
  5. Brand new roles. Generally, companies are used to filling their core positions — why go to an outside firm when you are in a rhythm? But then they create a brand new position in the company and they don’t know where to begin. This is a good time to ask for help from an expert.
  6. Confidential Search. If you have an employee that is under-performing, you may want to start recruiting before you let them go. Or you may need to recruit talent from organizations that your company does business with. In these cases, a search firm can provide the secrecy you need.
  7. Time & Resources. If your ‘day job’ is not recruiting, you may not have the time or focus to dedicate to an important search. Or your day job may be recruiting but you have too many open and not enough time. When you lack the time and resources, search firms are a great resource for giving an executive search the time and resources necessary.

Working with a search firm is not always a necessity. These seven scenarios are common cases for when it makes sense to hire help. After all, recruiting A players can be complex and requires strategy and a lot of hard work.

Need help with a search?

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Sourcing Quality over Quantity

February 17th, 2016

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

Quality Candidates over QuantitySourcing talent is often a sprint to find as many candidates as possible, as quickly as possible. A hiring manager’s starry-eyed expectations drive sourcing specialists’ motivation for speed and quantity. However to deliver quality talent, it’s important to manage those expectations as the best sourcers know that identifying the highest quality talent wins every time. Accordingly, those same sourcers are the ones who can not only source quality candidates, but can do so in a timely manner.

With the lowest national unemployment rate since February 2008, sourcing with efficiency makes the difference in quality hiring. For example, it’s easy to allow active candidates, about 21% of candidates according to LinkedIn, to dominate a majority of your new search. But it’s in the other 79% of candidates where the highest quality candidates hide. The 79% of passive candidates who are not actively searching for opportunities — but if approached strategically, are willing to listen and consider a career change. Choosing to spend time identifying high-quality talent over reviewing resumes that are on the top of the pile is an example of how an efficient sourcer can make a difference.

As a hiring manager: wouldn’t you rather receive a set of three high quality candidates instead of ten run-of-the-mill resumes?

Great sourcing requires digging and strategic thinking to identify a set of passive, high-quality talent. Passive talent is 120% more likely to want to make an impact than active candidates (LinkedIn). Talented sourcers skillfully market their open jobs to passive talent to generate interest in the opportunity, proving time after time the value of quality over quantity.

In the next CBI Way Blog, we’ll examine the strategic ways to market your open job to quality passive candidates.

Is “No Silos’ an achievable goal?

February 10th, 2016

Silo Mentality‘ is “an attitude found in some organizations that occurs when several departments or groups do not want to share information or knowledge with other individuals in the same company.” (Investopedia)

The key phrase I’d like to point out in the above definition is “do not want to share.” Why? I’ll get to that, but first let me set up where I am coming from.

No Silos is one of our Outside-In® values. We like to brag about being one team where politics, title and departments do not create barriers to doing business for us. With multiple brands, teams and functions this value symbolically declares our equality — regardless of title or role — to everyone internally and externally in the business.

Silo MentalityBut I am here to say that we have silos, and probably always will. There are a few sources of silos that are unavoidable. For one, it is only natural for people to imprint strongly or bond with a team, a client, or group of people (when you start in the same orientation class, for example). Folks are always going to find some commonality to silo around. Everyone looks to self identify — where we live, who we know, what we know and of course who we work with or share information with. We tend to discriminate or create silos when we don’t know others. It is easier to not help or not share when you are strangers. So with strong relationship bonds, silos are naturally created.

Another example of unavoidable silos in business are organizational functions. The operations, finance, HR and sales teams (and so on) are by nature separate functions that create silos for a number of reasons: knowledge/expertise, common projects & goals, shared leadership, or even the fact that people sit closer together. Work is organized in such a way that you spend a lot of time together working on similar work, and therefore barriers are created between one functional group and another.

So yes, companies and organizations will always have silos. There will always be groups of friends, project groups, account teams, functional departments and leadership at every company. Let’s go back to the phrase “do not want to share” in the definition of silo mentality. There is one thing that separates a company with silo mentality and one without: it’s the willingness to share information.

If you sense a Silo Mentality at your company, dig deeper into the why. 1. Are people unwilling to share information with other teams? 2. Are there rules from leadership that prevent information sharing? Or 3. Is it the organizational structure that makes it hard (but not impossible) to work across teams and departments?

At Outside-In® Companies, we have experienced a lot of organizational change lately as we get organized for growth and scaling. As we define roles and put infrastructure in place, we are experiencing some of #3. But what I can tell you, is that our issues with silos are not as severe as the stories I hear about from companies that experience #1 and #2. How about needing to fill out an actual form that must be approved by each department head to receive permission to talk to another department? So much for collaboration at the water cooler or getting together for happy hour to create, solve or address business problems, large or small.

Or this recent one. Sales and Account Management teams refused to include the Service team in the customer conversation. These departments misconstrued who owns relationships, and maybe most importantly who is involved with delivering an experience to the customer! Imagine trying to get anything done!

So yes, at the Outside-In® Companies, we do have Silos. But our Silo Mentality is not because we are unwilling to share with our team members or because we have rules in place that prevent cross-team collaboration. In fact, with No Silos as a value, cross-team collaboration is encouraged. The No Silos value is about building relationships because you can. And encourages reaching out across silos — without rules, forms, sign up sheets or leader’s permission. Regardless of a one leader’s behavior, one can always talk to or work with whom they want.

Now, back to the question at hand, “Is ‘No Silos’ an achievable goal?” No Silos is an aspirational value. It’s impossible to have No Silos in a business. But you can reinforce a ‘No Silos Mentality’ and adjust your organizational structure to break down barriers that prevent departments or teams from working well together. The mentality or mindset is achievable, and one we always strive to improve upon.

Does your company have a Silos Mentality? If so, you have a leadership problem. Yup, I said it. Silos exist because leaders allow it, can’t address it, or are rewarded or incentivized to allow them to exist. So dig deeper to find out the why.

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