Why the World Loves and Hates Executive Search Solutions

August 24th, 2016

The world loves Executive Search because it is easy, with either no or low commitment. In the world of contingency, you may not know my name or company logo but if I have the rare talent you need — you don’t seem to really care who I am all of that much.

Hiring managers (aka an expert in something other than hiring),  are happy to offload and delegate what they don’t like or know enough about — and that includes finding talent. This is strategic right? Outsource non-core tasks. Or is it lazy?

Executive Search Solutions

When people and culture are important to a company, leaders better be up to snuff in best in class hiring techniques. This is the quandary. Leaders and hiring managers know what’s expected of them, but can’t be good at everything. They understand that they are supposed to make talent important, but often don’t have the hiring infrastructure and support in place to be good at it. So, what do they do?

They excitedly or begrudgingly work with Search Firms.

We are your worst nightmare. The world hates Search Firms like mine because the service offers an expensive cost per hire. We are your last resort. Everyone in the business wants to avoid working with the dreaded executive search industry. You brag when you cut our costs. Sometimes it is the goal, lower hiring costs. But at what true expense and impact if you can’t find the talent you need to execute your business?

Nonetheless, you choose this, because you frankly have no other choice. Build expensive, scaled hiring infrastructure or pay someone for one hire who has that hiring process down pat and in place.

Don’t hate me for the honesty. Search firms exist on the fringes of your strategy at best. And I  know some great search firms, including my own. But we know our place. When we win, Human Resources sometimes feels like they lose, that we did their job or something. That should not be the case — the Search process works best when the firm partners with Human Resources and the Hiring Managers. When we are a part of the overall solution-building process. When we are a part of the organizational chart and strategy.

Why Having a Booth at a Job Fair is a Great Way to Recruit New Talent

August 17th, 2016

When it comes to recruiting new talent for your businessTalent Strategy Job Fair, you have multiple options to choose from. You have agencies with a database of talent that they can introduce to you and you even have job boards where prospective employees search and apply for jobs. However, another excellent method of recruiting new talent that you can use as a supplement to your recruiting strategy is through a booth at a job fair. Hosting a booth at a job fair can be an invaluable part of an overall recruitment strategy for your company.

Having a booth or desk at a job fair can have multiple benefits that can serve as a big boost to your overall recruiting endeavors. You will get to meet and interview each and every candidate that approaches your booth out of their curiosity about your company. You will have a chance to determine whether this job seeker is a presentable, well-spoken person who will get along well with your other employees.

Using a job fair as a recruitment strategy can especially be beneficial to companies that are looking for employees who have “soft skills” such as sales, communication, and management. Within a few minutes, you’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be confident, determined, and well-spoken enough to survive in the competitive and volatile world of outside or inside sales. You’ll be able to determine if a job seeker appears to be commanding enough and has enough control over his/her emotions to be able to manage a team of employees every day.

You can save a lot of time and money by only calling back employees who made a good first impression and who meet the criteria you’re looking for on the resume they handed to you at the job fair.

Some employers believe they can do some sort of video conferencing interview to quickly screen candidates instead of participating in a job fair, but you may not have a chance to see as much as you could when you meet a candidate face-to-face. Through video, you may not be able to determine how a person carries himself, what his/her body language is really like, and whether he has a strong presence. All of these factors are definitely important particularly when candidates are seeking jobs where they have to deal with clients on a regular basis.

We highly recommend that you take advantage of the opportunity to host a booth or desk at a job fair. As we mentioned, this gives you the chance to really see job candidates as a whole. How can you find them? Let’s list some ways:

  • Online directories
  • Contact colleges campus officials
  • Find big outdoor events

We have one final tip: pay close attention to what a candidate asks you when one approaches your booth. This will shed light on his/her level of interest as well as his/her intentions.

Is Passive Talent Better Than Active Job Seekers?

August 10th, 2016

Balance weighing two spheres blue and red. Scales measuring abstract objects. Comparison choice confusion exchange and decision concept. EPS 8 vector illustration no transparency

One of the more difficult aspects of sourcing and recruiting is engaging with passive talent. It takes a thoughtful and strategic plan, and even a detailed plan isn’t guaranteed to work. So it’s leaves you to wonder — is passive talent better than active candidates, anyway?

The answer isn’t clear. There are benefits to both hiring active and passive talent. Passive talent is often that very niche pool of candidates that has a specialized skill set, and therefore highly sought and generally very valuable to any company. Therefore, recruiting passive talent can be expensive and time consuming, especially without an efficient talent acquisition process.

Active candidates are at least keeping their ears open for a new opportunity and often pursuing those roles proactively. Sometimes, this can mean the candidate is more willing to make a move, will make that move more quickly, and for less of a salary increase. At the same time, why are they actively looking for a new role, good or bad?

Again, it’s hard to determine if one type of candidate is better than the other. Both have their traditional qualities, and both could be the absolute right fit for your company. Generally, having a preference before going into the recruiting process could create undesirable gaps in your talent acquisition process.

15 things I learned over 15 years! Advice I might give my 32 year old self.

July 27th, 2016

Who ever thinks about where they will be 15 years from now? Who really thinks about tomorrow? At 32, I put it all on the line and became the fourth generation in my family to take the entrepreneurial plunge – starting my first company, CBI Group.

I was asked to share a little bit about what I have learned over the last 15 years of running my own business, CBI Group and the Outside-In® Companies. Perhaps I can pass on some wisdom you might find useful, or a musing that you find entertaining? For me this is pretty darn cathartic! Write it down. Get it out. And keep pressing play and come back at it again tomorrow, right? That is what most entrepreneurs do best. As Churchill said, “Never, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever, ever give up.” These are my words to live by through thick and thin.

As I think back I get emotional. I have had servers stolen, office roofs collapse, 9/11 on my first day. I have had floods and fires on Super Bowl Sunday! Through all the good, bad and disaster, here goes 15 thoughts from reflecting on 15 years in business.

  1. Most business are not pink unicorn businesses. Few entrepreneurs have million dollar business ideas, let alone billion dollar ones. So think about it as you sip your Starbucks, while shopping using your Amazon Prime account to compare rates with Walmart. To be the next Facebook, you have to have a scalable idea, a really great brand promise that is very defendable, and be a very skilled leader/founder that knows how to scale. Most of us mere business mortals build our businesses and keep them for a long time. Progress, profit, growth, real break through impact and change come slowly! And not all businesses will sell, merge or be acquired. Day after day we run our companies.
  2. What is success, anyway? The funny thing about success is that it looks easy. And is often viewed that way with envy and jealousy. However, show me an overnight success and I guarantee you it is the exception to the rule. Success is a judgement, anyway. Success comes with hard work, luck, perseverance, and fortitude that few can stomach. I am at year 15. Success is all relative.
  3. The stages of growth are challenging. If you’re lucky to navigate the growth stages, to learn from them, and frankly survive your inevitable inability to adapt and change fast enough, you have learned this too. As leaders we must change our approach/style/focus and even our goals for each phase of growth. And no one tells you this when you start! I started this business with a flip cell phone, an 89 page business plan, and a card table desk in a friend’s office break room. (Thank you, Jim!) We grew, added staff and then one day nothing worked. We adjusted and changed and then we hit another growth wall. Years later, I am now better informed on what goes into next growth stage and the challenges that we will face as a company, and that I will face as a leader. The lucky ones get a chance to learn from their mistakes and live to fight another day. Some great insight on each phase of growth can be found at here.
  4. Just how often can I change my style and role, anyway? Day 1 I did everything… Sales, marketing, customer service, hiring, billing, taking out the trash, you name it. Where did all of these employees come from anyway? 15 years, three brands, thousands of employees and customers later… think of all those budgets, strategic plans, and years of promise and change? Today, I spend my days teaching and coaching leaders and employees in through making tough decisions for their business. Our values guide me in my work and help others to forge their own path and make their own decisions. Some days, I still sell, market, answer the phone, and take out the trash. BUT, I come back resolutely to our strategy. Where we are going? And why? And then I align everyone to the plan and to the current operational plans for the business this quarter. And my role will continue to involve — what will year 20 look like?
  5. Hiring more people is an entrepreneurial answer to just about everything. We get excited about growth and enjoy opening more offices, generating more sales and of course increasing headcount. BUT, I’ve learned what you really need to do is to solve problems with better scalable systems and technologies! That is where value and scaling can come into play.
  6. Define your why. Coming to work without a real purpose or perhaps to just make money is a hollow place to be. Customers, employees, and vendor/partners get excited when your business exists to serve the greater good. Why do you get out of bed? Defining that in your business attracts folks to your business and keeps them coming back.
  7. Go find someone who has solved the problem before. If you know me as stubborn, you would not be the only one. My biggest learn over the last five years is all around this point. For years I solved the problem with what I had, my way of thinking and my team. Instead? Go get the answer, find folks that have solved it before. Gather perspective. Then make your path forward with that information. So much time, energy, resources and money have been wasted on starting from scratch! This is a problem when you have a culture that prides itself on innovation and creativity. I’ve learned that simple is often more elegant.
  8. Not everyone is going on the ride with you. Or at least the whole ride. My dad, Alan Burkhard told me once, “Not even your mother made all 27 years with me in the business.” Life changes. Business needs change. Folks do different things, they move, change careers, get married and start businesses. Or they disagree with your thinking and business direction… and they leave you. Get used it! However, treat them like they will be with you forever. I had less then 2% turnover in core staff the first 7 years. Man, I used to brag about it. Then we changed business models and great legacy folks left me. My heart was broken at the time. No one goes on the ride with you the entire trip. Get used to it. I have.
  9. Make it really hard to get in your business. But easy to leave. This is a borrowed family mantra. But it works really well. In other words, hire slowly. But throw folks a party when they leave. Loyalty and allegiance are good things. Unless that is all that is left. And it happens. Staff and the jobs they are in do not remain a good fit for long. We are really lucky if your current duties align with your interest more then a few times a year. Work is cyclical and project based. Most businesses change everything fast. Try and stay aligned to the purpose. Try to keep your quarterly goals relevant as the business changes month to month. Do your quarterly or six month goals seem outdated when you go to review them? Welcome to the pace of change today. Agile employees, agile rolling forecasts, agile performance reviews or feedback sessions. Everything must be portable, flexible and easy to move. Including you.
  10. Be way more conservative and realistic. I have suffered from and am often overly optimistic. I am reformed at this point. But at 32, I could sell, I could talk fast,  and I could and did try to outwork others. So most of the time, I was lucky enough to outwork my optimism. But the truth is I have had to be much more honest around planning scenarios. Today, work cast scenario planning really matters to me. And I prefer realistic  and conservative thinking today. And it is hard this way. Running a business can be more fun when your a gambler who goes for it all of the time. No rules in the early years of the business is fun for others right? Until you fail big time. And I have. So, today I balance long-range strategy thinking (and dreaming) with a dose of reality.
  11. Have you really mastered being a leader? I hear it takes 10,000 hours of practice to master anything. Humbly, I am triple that in real world practice as a leader. And I still have so much to learn.
  12. I wish I did not wait so long to be direct. Tell the truth. Let folks know where they stand. Give them feedback. We all crave it. Stop hinting someone to death. Love them up or out. Your team deserves to be successful, challenged, and to be the best they can be for you. Or move folks on to their next successful place. That is a leader’s job – or at least one that cares about their people.
  13. Running a business is cyclical. Economic swings, job markets and times/politics change. I always felt I was too small a business to worry about how much market share I had. BUT, I wish I had learned earlier on that the market changes. And how I run the business needs to change with it. There are times to go for it, and times to be very conservative and play things tight to the vest.
  14. I had no idea I could be this patient. If I had to give my younger 32 year old self some advice it would be, “This is going to take a while. You’re going to need to sacrifice everything. Put it all on the line, everything, your house, your marriage, your key relationships… Younger self, are you ready for all of this? Time, patience, fortitude, moxie, perseverance. At times you go numb. At times you come to the office but take the day off mentally. But most days the world will not let you. Entrepreneurs need to be relevant and focused almost every day to make it. And that says nothing about success or making it big time!”
  15. Everything changes. Good days fade. Bad days take longer to go away. Business is terrific. Then change happens. Some years you grow and don’t make money. And in flat years you’re running a better company and the bottom line is sweet! Change keeps coming. Employees come and go. Customers are bought and sold, go bankrupt and move out of town. Customers’ needs and wants change. Multi-million dollar business lines dry up. New products grow up before your eyes and become your big bell winner, your future. Rookies become managers. Managers become senior leaders. I have learned that being a student of change is my one true advantage. Embrace it, drive it, and know status quo is deadly in the long run!

So my 32 year old self was full of himself. Glib and confident. Boundless and endless energy on reserve. Every problem in the business was one I created. I celebrated those early fiascos, they were fun to try and resolve. Everything was about the vision for what I wanted to build with that early team. We were going to reinvent and create a space in staffing and professional services. We vowed to make culture important (believe it or not when those words were foreign in most business’s large and small). I worked endlessly. For two years straight I worked every single day. My theory was an hour worked today is an hour I would get back when I exited the business. The exit plan was scheduled for year nine! Well, six years later I am still at it. Today it’s much more about the journey than the destination.

p.s. if you’re interested, here are my 10 musings from our 10th anniversary in 2011!

How to Recruit Passive Candidates, Part 2

July 20th, 2016

As discussed, the goal of of sourcing passive candidates is to build relationships with highly skilled pools of talent. You usually won’t find passive candidate resumes online, and engagement requires a strategic and thoughtful approach. So, what can you do?

passive candidate pool First, it’s important to build your pool, and in turn, your network. A great way to be successful is name generation. While resumes are nearly impossible to find, names are not. You know your target candidate, and you know the companies where they work. In it’s simplest form, creating an excel spreadsheet with columns of name, title, company, location, and contact info is a great start.

Use all the channels possible to build your pool; LinkedIn, associations, conferences, company websites, and universities, just to name a few. Put every name you find that is attached to the target industry and expertise for which you’re looking on the list. It can’t hurt to have more than you need when building a pool for passive sourcing.

With your list or ‘talent pool’ complete, you can begin to engage. You can start with your primary targets, or folks you know wouldn’t be an exact fit, but could be a great referral source. Modify your email or message for each set of candidates, requesting their expertise to identify the extremely niche skill set you seek.

More often than not, people are willing to help, point you in a good direction, or even have a colleague who would be interested that you missed. It’s important to be thorough and resilient when sourcing passive candidates, traits that will set you apart from every other sourcer or recruiter in the war for talent.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

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What is sourcing in recruitment process?

July 6th, 2016

Sourcing Recruitment ProcessSourcing is a common term, often used in the procurement of services and vendors. But sourcing is also commonly used in regards to talent acquisition. So what is sourcing in the recruitment process? Since not all jobs can be filled by posting a job online and having applicants find you, you (or someone on behalf of your company) have to go find good candidates to fill your position. That is sourcing.

Sourcing is a talent acquisition discipline which is focused on the identification, assessment and engagement of skilled worker candidates through proactive recruiting techniques (Wiki).

But wait, isn’t that recruiting? While sourcing is a discipline within the recruiting process, there is a distinction between sourcing and recruiting. Check out our article How is Talent Sourcing Different from Recruiting? There is also some heated debate over the definition of Sourcing vs. Recruiting, and whether recruiters are sourcers are recruiters.

What do you think?

How to Recruit Passive Candidates

June 22nd, 2016

magnet attracting passive candidatesSometimes recruiting can be pretty straight forward. You have an open job, you post it online, and a significant pool of talented individuals apply for the job, eagerly expressing their interest. You interview, negotiate offers and fill the position. But often, when the job opening requires unique talent, passive talent will be the target. Active candidates don’t fulfill the requirements and you need to reach the candidates that aren’t searching for jobs, haven’t expressed any interest in your requisition, and are generally happy with their current role.

Recruiting these passive candidates requires a strategic approach to generate interest. Passive candidates usually don’t have a resume online, and certainly aren’t regularly applying to jobs. Identifying and recruiting passive candidates should be focused on marketing the opportunity to each individual. Think about why his or her background translates well into the role, and tailor your message appropriately.

The goal is to engage and build relationships with pools of highly skilled candidates. It’s important to position yourself as an expert in the industry market and develop your network. Again, marketing or selling the job and company is crucial. Put yourself in their shoes. What’s it like to receive an unexpected message, call, or an invitation to connect on social media? Are you making that unexpected conversation worth their while? Remember, in the passive candidate market, the recruiter needs the candidate, not the other way around.

Need help catching the attention of passive talent?

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Please Stop Writing about Millennials in the Workplace

June 15th, 2016

Millennials chatterIn five years, a majority of workers will be Millennials. Boomers are retiring or being replaced at a rapid pace of 10-13,000 per day! Everyone talks about how Millennials are going to change work for the rest of us. They have. But the change started long before they came on the scene in large numbers. The only point that matters is that many of us want to work differently. And have been working on it since Millennials were born.

Smart businesses have realized that most of us don’t work for a paycheck. We work for a purpose. Which is why so many of us care about working some place that has a mission!

They say Millennials only care about their growth and new skills. Haven’t we all grown tired of video games and smoothies at work? Food and tchotchkes barely, if ever, really mattered that much compared to how much I liked my job. But, chances to have new experiences? Lead new projects. Learn new technologies. That is what real talent has always wanted.

Nobody can lead like a 5 star general anymore. Command and Control is dead. Communication and ideas must flow freely. And decision making is distributed and pushed out to the front lines, putting decision makers much closer to the customer. This is not new, this is 20 years in the making kind of stuff. Millennials (and the rest of us) want leaders that can coach too and value our whole selves. So please, stop writing and talking about Millennials in the workplace. We get it, there’s a lot of them.

The Many Names of a Talent Acquisition Professional

June 8th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs we discussed last week in What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?, the world of talent acquisition continues to evolve and with it, so do the roles of recruiting professionals. While the titles themselves don’t really matter, it’s important to clearly define roles within your internal recruiting department. Who does what? When & how often? How do you communicate and coordinate as a team? When building a talent acquisition team, clear allocations of roles & responsibilities is crucial.

But back to the many job titles of a recruitment professional — to prove to you just how many options there are we brainstormed as many names as we could, not including level and geography denotations like “junior” or “regional.” You can also add many more dimensions by adding specific functional recruiting like “technical/IT” or “marketing” and industries like “life sciences” or “healthcare” to define the types of roles and sectors the recruiting professional works with. We excluded words & phrases like “contract” “part time” or “remote”, which do play large part in talent strategy but add too many possibilities to the list. Finally, you can also get pay homage to your culture with creative adjectives like “Off-centered Recruiter” or “Rockstar Recruiter” so we left those out too.

By the end of it, we came up with 154 titles for talent acquisition professionals. Are we missing any? As social media and drip marketing evolves, we are on the look out for new roles & titles that specialize in new sourcing channels in candidate communications/engagement. Comment below if you have a title to add!

  1. Campus Recruiter
  2. Campus Recruitment Manager
  3. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  4. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  5. Chief People Officer
  6. Chief Talent Officer
  7. College Recruiter
  8. Contingent Workforce Manager
  9. Contract Recruiter
  10. Corporate Recruiter
  11. Corporate Recruitment Lead
  12. Deputy Head of Recruitment
  13. Direct Recruiter
  14. Direct Recruitment Specialist
  15. Director – Executive Recruitment
  16. Director – Strategic Resourcing
  17. Executive Recruiter
  18. Executive Recruiting Leader
  19. Executive Recruitment Manager
  20. Executive Search Lead
  21. Executive Talent Acquisition
  22. Executive Talent Sourcing Manager
  23. Experienced Hire Recruiter
  24. Experienced Hire Recruitment Manager
  25. External Candidate Developer
  26. Global Graduate Resourcing Manager
  27. Global Program Manager – Employer Branding
  28. Global Talent Selection Manager
  29. Graduate Recruiter
  30. Graduate Recruitment Advisor
  31. Graduate Recruitment Manager
  32. Head of Campus Recruitment
  33. Head of Client Services (RPO)
  34. Head of Graduate Recruitment
  35. Head of Graduates, Apprentices, & Resourcing
  36. Head of In-house Executive Search
  37. Head of Projects – Talent Acquisition
  38. Head of Recruitment
  39. Head of Recruitment Operations
  40. Head of Recruitment Projects
  41. Head of Recruitment Strategy
  42. Head of Resourcing
  43. Head of RPO Projects
  44. Head of Senior Hires Recruitment
  45. Head of Student Recruitment
  46. Head of Talent Acquisition
  47. Headhunter
  48. HR Manager – Recruitment
  49. HR Manager – Resourcing
  50. HR Staffing Specialist
  51. Hybrid Recruiter
  52. In-house Recruiter
  53. Inhouse Recruitment Consultant
  54. Internal Recruiter
  55. Internal Recruiter – Interns & Apprenticeships
  56. Internal Recruitment Manager
  57. Internal Talent Acquisition Manager
  58. Internet Recruiter
  59. Lateral Recruiter
  60. Lateral Recruitment Manager
  61. Lead Recruiter
  62. Lead Sourcing Consultant
  63. Lead Talent Scout
  64. Leadership Recruiter
  65. Manager – Executive Search
  66. Manager – Talent Systems & Resourcing
  67. MBA Recruiter
  68. MBA Recruitment Manager
  69. Onsite Account Director/RPO Account Director
  70. Onsite Account Manager/RPO Account Manager
  71. People Manager
  72. Principal Delivery Consultant
  73. Principal Recruitment Specialist
  74. Recruiter
  75. Recruiter / Sourcer
  76. Recruiting Coordinator
  77. Recruiting Researcher
  78. Recruitment & Engagement Manager
  79. Recruitment Account Manager
  80. Recruitment Advisor
  81. Recruitment Business Partner
  82. Recruitment Consultant
  83. Recruitment Director
  84. Recruitment Executive
  85. Recruitment Lead
  86. Recruitment Manager
  87. Recruitment Marketing Manager
  88. Recruitment Officer
  89. Recruitment Operations Manager
  90. Recruitment Partner
  91. Recruitment Program Manager
  92. Recruitment Representative
  93. Recruitment Specialist
  94. Recruitment Strategy & Planning Manager
  95. Recruitment Team Lead
  96. Recruitment Team Leader
  97. Researcher
  98. Resource Consultant
  99. Resource Partner
  100. Resourcer
  101. Resourcing & Recruitment Manager
  102. Resourcing Advisor
  103. Resourcing Associate
  104. Resourcing Business Partner
  105. Resourcing Director
  106. Resourcing Lead
  107. Resourcing Manager
  108. Resourcing Partner
  109. Resourcing Program Lead
  110. Resourcing Relationship Manager
  111. Resourcing Specialist
  112. RPO Lead
  113. Senior Recruiter
  114. Service Delivery Manager
  115. Sourcer
  116. Sourcing Advisor
  117. Sourcing Director
  118. Sourcing Manager
  119. Sourcing Specialist
  120. Sourcing Team Leader
  121. Staffing Channels Intelligence Researcher
  122. Staffing Consultant
  123. Staffing Manager
  124. Staffing Specialist
  125. Strategic Recruitment Lead
  126. Strategic Sourcing Recruiter
  127. Supplier Relationship Manager
  128. Talent Acquisition Administrator
  129. Talent Acquisition Advisor
  130. Talent Acquisition Associate
  131. Talent Acquisition Business Partner
  132. Talent Acquisition Consultant
  133. Talent Acquisition Coordinator
  134. Talent Acquisition Director
  135. Talent Acquisition Lead
  136. Talent Acquisition Leader
  137. Talent Acquisition Manager
  138. Talent Acquisition Operations Manager
  139. Talent Acquisition Partner/Business Partner – Talent Acquisition
  140. Talent Acquisition Program Manager
  141. Talent Acquisition Recruiter
  142. Talent Attraction Consultant
  143. Talent Attraction Specialist
  144. Talent Consultant – Executive Search
  145. Talent Data & Research Specialist
  146. Talent Engagement Advisor
  147. Talent Identification Manager
  148. Talent Magnet
  149. Talent Partner
  150. Talent Recruiter
  151. Talent Scout
  152. Talent Search Manager
  153. Talent Sourcer
  154. Talent Sourcing Lead
  155. Talent Sourcing Lead
  156. Talent Sourcing Manager
  157. Talent Sourcing Partner
  158. Talent Sourcing Specialst
  159. Talent Specialist
  160. University Relations Recruiter
  161. University Staffing Consultant
  162. Vendor Management Specialist -Talent Acquisition
  163. Vendor Manager – Recruitment

Need help structuring your talent acquisition department?

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What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?

June 1st, 2016

talent-sourcer-sourcing-roleAs Talent Acquisition evolves, so do the roles involved in the process. One of the first challenges when deciding to hire new talent, is identifying the talent itself. Usually, the team member who tackles this challenge is the Talent Sourcer, also referred to as a Sourcing Specialist, Sourcer, Internet Recruiter, Recruiting Researcher, Candidate Attraction Specialist or Talent Scout. What does the Talent Sourcer do on a daily basis?

In it’s most standard definition, a Sourcer’s function in Talent Acquisition is the proactive identification of candidates that match a desired skill set for a current or future job opening. Yet, it is certainly more involved and detailed than such a general definition. While a Recruiter often handles the back end of Talent Acquisition, the Sourcer will handle the primary responsibilities of the process.

A Talent Sourcer is responsible for creating the Sourcing Strategy, which sets the entire process up for success. With strategy in hand, Sourcers proactively identify and engage with skilled workers to fill a current or future need, often gauging and generating interest in the opportunity. Depending on the strategy, reaching out to possible candidates via social media, email, and/or phone calls is also included in the Sourcer’s daily tasks.

While a quick phone screen may included, a Talent Sourcer usually stops short of interviewing and dispositioning, as well as on-boarding and negotiating offers. Sourcers and Recruiters work hand-in-hand, but tend to have defined roles during the recruitment process. Without defined roles and responsibilities, Talent Acquisition can quickly become scattered, and ultimately lack the efficiency that drives a great candidate experience.

Need to define the roles on your talent acquisition team?

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