3 Things a Headhunter Won’t Do For You

May 18th, 2016

headhunters-jobThere are many misconceptions about headhunters. As a job seeker, it can be frustrating if you expect a headhunter to do certain things and then they don’t. To help clear the air a little, here are 3 things that a headhunter won’t do for you.

Headhunters won’t:

  1. Read between the lines. If you’re not clear about your must haves or absolutely nots, headhunters won’t consider the things that are important to you in their communications with the employer. Don’t make assumptions that either the headhunter simply understands where you’re coming from or that they can decode your round-about way of communicating your priorities. Be clear with salary expectations, benefits, things you will do and aren’t interested in doing in a job, where you will travel and won’t, etc. That way the headhunter can find a good fit or negotiate terms. Oh, and if things change — make sure you let the headhunter know— I’ll reiterate that headhunters are not mind readers.
  2. Do all the work for you. Job seekers often assume that because a headhunter agrees to meet them, that they will find them a job. This is not the case. A headhunter’s job is to find the right candidate for their client, an employer who is paying for their recruitment services. In some cases, they may present you to other companies as well, but most often that is because they have other clients with similar needs. No headhunter will be able to find a job for every single person who contacts their recruiting firm. If a headhunter is presenting you to an employer for a job (that’s great!), make sure you’re tracking down other job leads as well.
  3. Tell you what you like to do or what you’re good at. It’s not a headhunter’s responsibility to tell you what career path to pursue, what types of things you like to do, or what you excel at doing. It may be tough, but if you’re struggling with what to do with your life — that’s up to you and only you to figure out. You can talk to friends and family to sort through pros and cons and receive guidance, our you can hire a career coach, but don’t lean on a headhunter. But when you do figure it all out, by all means, give a headhunter a call!

How is talent sourcing different from recruiting?

May 13th, 2016

recruiter-vs-sourcing-specialistRecruiting in the traditional sense includes at the very least some talent sourcing. Both sourcing and recruiting are often intertwined skills and responsibilities. But more recently, Talent Acquisition strategy is trending toward a more specialized approach, separating talent sourcing and recruiting roles. So what’s the difference between sourcing and recruiting, anyway?

Typically, recruiting includes reworking job descriptions, choosing candidates from a pipeline, leading the interview process, and managing offers and on-boarding. Specifically, recruiting does not often include the proactive identification of candidates outside of the talent pipeline. That pipeline is the product of excellent talent sourcing.

Successful talent sourcing requires a thoughtful and detailed strategy. Identifying, engaging, generating interest, and ultimately building a pipeline of candidates can either make or break the talent acquisition process. Therefore, sourcing talent has become a specialized skill set, requiring in-depth knowledge of techniques, tools, and channels that differ from the skill set and strengths of a recruiter.

Of course, Talent Acquisition thrives on the consistency and collaboration of both talent sourcing and recruiting. Consequently, there is a emphasis on information sharing and teamwork for either to be deemed successful. Don’t be afraid to think about your recruiting process critically — you just may identify a weakness that could be easily corrected.

Why Managers are Failing to Hire – It’s not always HR’s Fault

May 4th, 2016

Often, managers keep C talent in roles too long. Here’s why networking can help.

First, it’s important to understand what today’s economy and labor market look like:

  1. There are a lot of job openings.
  2. Unemployment is low.
  3. 1 in 3 workers that is happy, however, they intend to change jobs.

Yes, we are now in a market where happy workers are moving around and ready for their next challenge!

In a candidate’s market, what do managers do about hiring for their team/department/division? I know what they do. Complain to Human Resources and to their boss that they are not seeing enough talent for their openings. I hear this everyday from customers. And we tell them the same thing every time. Failing managers count on others to find talent for their organizations. And then blame HR or Talent Acquisition teams.  

This is why failing managers keep average or below average talent. In survey after survey, managers admit they keep sub par talent because they have no one else to do the job. Which is another way of saying that they don’t intend to do that job either. They are simply happy with the notion that someone is doing the work. But the failing employees are not happy! The employees are missing time, or making mistakes, and causing havoc with the rest of the team. Aren’t leaders responsible for budgets, productivity and results? Of course.

how-to-hire-a-players-coverSo why not network to go from being an average or failing leader to one who networks and fills their own jobs? This is what I call keeping your sofa full. (Check out chapter 7 in How to Hire A Players by Eric Herrenkohl.)

Failing (C players) managers blame others and do nothing.

Winning Leaders (A players) get out out to meet talent at trade shows, industry events, chamber meetings, or at civic and social clubs. Leaders get out to build their network. To meet people. To offer help and create value. But they are always working on building their bench and know who their next hire is going to be!

Which type of leader are you?

What is a pipeline of candidates?

April 27th, 2016

A common definition: A pipeline of candidates also referred to as a ‘candidate pipeline’ or ‘talent pipeline‘ is a pool of candidates who are qualified to assume open positions when they are created or vacated through retirement, promotion, or someone leaving the company.

what-is-a-pipeline-of-candidates

To clear up any misconceptions of what a candidate pipeline is, let’s discuss what a pipeline of candidates is not.

A pipeline of candidates is not…

  1. A Resume Database: Any company with an Applicant Tracking System or file of resumes collected over time technically has a ‘database of candidates.’ Likely those same candidates sent their resume to other companies, which means just having the resume isn’t worth much of anything. Has anyone qualified those candidates or built relationships with the people behind the resumes? Without at least a phone screen, a batch of resumes is no more helpful than a pile of blank paper.
  2. A Static, On-call List of Candidates: In the world of recruiting, you’re not buying a thing, you’re buying a person. People have wants and needs, and they often change and evolve. People are promoted, switch jobs, change paths, have different priorities, etc., etc. It’s important to stay in touch with candidates and move people on and off the list of qualified candidates. If you’re buying a pipeline of candidates, you should expect that a Recruitment Consultant is staying in touch with the humans on the list and updating the talent pipeline.
  3. An Exclusive Access Pass to Top Talent: No recruiter has ‘a list of people that no one has. LinkedIn is public and the world is small. Lists may be different but don’t expect that your money can buy something that the company down the street can’t.

Now that we’ve cleared that up, I hope you’ve also learned that developing a pipeline of candidates takes time and requires consistent relationship building. This is what makes a ‘list of names’ investing the time in or worth paying for. Instead of a pile of resumes, a talent pipeline is a list of qualified candidates that have each shared their background, skills, career goals and and interests with a Recruiter and those things line up with your company’s ideal candidate profile.

Building a talent pipeline is a shift from reactive recruiting to proactive recruiting, or recruiting in advance of your hiring needs. So instead of waiting until a position opens or is vacated, you work to fill future openings with talent that is a fit for your business. It means that when you have a new job open or an employee leaves, you can tap your talent pipeline to fill your jobs faster. That’s how a talent pipeline improves your recruiting process.

Time is Leading Recruiting Challenge for Healthcare Employers

April 20th, 2016

Solving recruitment and talent acquisition problems can be, to say the least, challenging — particularly in the healthcare industry, where there’s such a shortage of talent. But what is keeping healthcare recruiting teams from solving talent problems? Time-Healthcare-Recruiting-ChallengeAccording to CareerBuilder’s Pulse of Health Care Survey, 45% of health care employers cited a lack of time as the greatest factor preventing them from solving challenges in their recruitment process.

Here are a few simple strategies that aren’t time consuming to improve your recruitment process:

Job Description: Overhauling a job description or summary can make a great difference in attracting talent to your open roles. Most descriptions are very similar and therefore looked over. It’s important to create excitement in the simplest form of marketing for your job; the description.

Application process: Think simple. Does everyone involved in your process need to be involved? Could your team shorten the initial phone screen? According to OfficeVibe, 60% of candidates have quit an application process because it took too long.

Get help: Often, identifying the right talent is the biggest pain point of the recruitment process. Without talent, there is no recruiting or talent acquisition. Outsourcing your sourcing and talent pipelining to experts could grant you the extra time to focus on solving other problems in the process.

Address your recruiting challenges today.

Recruitment-Assessment

Why Networking Pays Off for the Best Candidates

April 14th, 2016

In thinking about what sets the best candidates apart from the average ones, here’s why networking pays off for the best candidates, but doesn’t work for the average ones.

The best candidates understand that networking is not an event. Instead, it’s something you do with regularity, like the slow and steady drip of the coffee pot each and every morning. Networking is not what you do when you’re unemployed and looking for your next gig. Or something you do when you’re in sales and your need to reach your monthly sales quota… The world we sees you coming, you need something, right? Well, you’re the last person the room wants to meet.

best-candidates-networkThe best candidates can network because they do it consistently in their company, in their industry and in their local marketplace. They know networking helps address many professional needs at one time. That networking allows you to learn from others. And is a way to meet people (and for people can meet you). Yes,  relational capital. Check out Ed Wallace, The Relational Ladder for more good stuff on that!

The best candidates build relationships with the people they meet, which leads to opportunities to help/serve/do something for others. It is in this act of service that the best candidates distinguish themselves. When you know someone, you can build trust, respect and even like them. And the best candidates learn to accumulate these relationships and develop a network of connections that have been cultivated to develop mutual benefit and gain.  The more a good candidate networks and serves, the more the they can count on their network to reciprocate.

To be the best candidate, practice these simple steps:

  • Network like clock work (harder than it sounds).
  • Serve the needs of others.
  • Practice the “accumulation and time effects” — network a little all of the time forever.
  • Do more for your network than you ask of it.
  • Live by a mantra of trust, credibility and value creation:
    • Be trustworthy— make your word mean something with impeccable follow through.
    • Have credibility— Give back to your network with what you know and who you know.
    • Ask yourself, am I creating value for people in my network?

So yes, the best candidates are great at networking.  And they are in demand because of it.  These candidates can land any coffee meet up or job they want in their network. How do I know? Think of the best candidates, they usually fit this mold!

What is a passive job candidate?

April 8th, 2016

Just about anyone in a company may have to recruit at some point in their career, but if you’re not entrenched in the world of talent acquisition, you may not be up to speed on all recruiting jargon. Like “passive candidate” for example.  Recruiters are not making a judgement call about a candidate’s personality, instead they are categorizing them based on who is seeking who.

what-is-passive-job-candidateGoogle offers a great definition: A passive candidate (passive job candidate) is someone who is being considered for a position but is not actively searching for a job.

An active candidate, on the other hand, is someone searching for a job. They are on the job boards, going to networking events, emailing recruiters and applying to open jobs. In that case, the candidate is actively seeking a new job. For passive candidates, it’s the recruiters who found them. A recruiter came across information about a person or found their online job profile and thinks they are a great fit for a certain job and/or company. In this case, the recruiter is seeking the candidate.

Passive candidates are often considered to be higher quality candidates, but they can also be more difficult to engage and convince to make a career move. As the economy shifts back and forth from an employer’s market to a candidate’s market, the number of active candidates ebbs and flows. LinkedIn reports that “Passive talent accounts for 79% of working professionals around the world.” Regardless of whether or not passive talent is better or not, targeting passive candidates should always be a part of your recruiting strategy, especially for rare & hard-to-fill roles. Here’s a few suggestions for how to catch the attention of A+ talent that ignores you.

Need help attracting top talent?

Recruitment-Assessment

 

 

Most Will Find their Next Job Through Networking

March 23rd, 2016

Networking Is RecruitingThe largest % of the workforce will find their next job through networking. That’s right. People are more likely to land their next position through the people that they know. And this is proven true time and time again, at any level and for any role. Technology and social media are not replacements for talking to the people you know about your job search, instead they enable you to do it even better.

Let’s think this through from a recruiting perspective.

Are your managers meeting with people and networking to fill their own roles? If not, they are missing out on building their own bench of talent. How do you think recruiters and recruiting firms (like mine) find talent, anyway? We network all of the time! That is what real recruitment is all about; meeting talent in your community and finding the players you want to put on your virtual bench for your next hiring need! With constant networking, jobs get filled faster. Average talent is replaced.  And better talent is attracted over time!

If you haven’t caught on yet, I am stating that the best companies fill their roles when leaders and employees view recruitment as part of their core job, on top of what their HR and talent acquisition teams are doing. Recruiting is much faster when leaders are networking — both for business and for hiring. And when they meet with the talent in their community, well in advance of their need. What does this look like? This is where managers accept coffee meetings from candidates that network with them, even if they don’t have a current job opening. Where your team goes to lunch with competitors or attends industry events to meet others in your field/industry.

So, hiring managers — do as the best staffing firms do; get out from behind your desk and meet folks. All of the time. Build a bench of relationships. Your company (and your recruiters) will thank you!

Next up: Why the best candidate can network and average ones can’t!

 

Engaging Quality Candidates

March 16th, 2016

Attract-engage-talentLast month we examined the preference of sourcing quality over quantity. The catch; however, is that those quality, and often passive candidates, are far more difficult to engage from a sourcing perspective. In turn, approaching engagement with quality candidates strategically can differentiate you from the market and land you the top talent you or your client seek.

So what can you do to separate yourself from the competition?

  1. Be specific and creative: Take the time to research your target’s experience and their footprint. Knowing where the candidate has worked, where they went to school, or what their personal interests are could go a long way in gaining his or her trust as a recruiting partner.
  2. Focus on the opportunity and growth: Put the focus on the talent. Show your expertise in the details about the opportunity and what making a move could mean long-term for your candidate. It’s not just a new job, it could be a crucial progression in a their career, taking he or she to new heights.
  3. Build Relationships: It can be easy to simply sell the job and your company to active candidates who are looking to make a move. On the other hand, passive candidates will need more convincing to even have a conversation. Find out what he or she would be open to hearing about before presenting the opportunity. Try delving into likes and dislikes about their current role, positioning yourself as a consultant, while conveying your industry knowledge and the current state of the market.

Looking for help with your talent strategy?

Recruitment-Assessment

Being Creative with Your Recruiting Model

March 9th, 2016

What is the best way to find talent for your business?

If I had to sum up a talent acquisition manager’s job, it would be with that question. The people responsible for recruiting in 2016 face the challenge of attracting quality applicants in a candidate’s market, keeping up with hiring demands, and ensuring all this work is on budget. You’re expected to have a streamlined recruiting process with consistent candidate messaging representing your employer brand, and you need to optimize that process for each skill set using targeted and up-to-date tools and methods. Easy day in the life, right?

The competitive market is putting talent acquisition at the top of the business’ strategic goals. If you’re struggling with the best way to find talent for your business in any capacity, it’s time to get creative with your recruiting model.

So, what’s the first step?

The first thing you need to do is identifying the business challenge. To create an effective recruitment solution, first you need to uncover the true source of your recruiting woes. Where’s the gap? What are you struggling with most? Maybe you’ve got a streamlined process and a great employer brand but are not having success finding quality candidates for a specific skill set like sales, IT or healthcare. Perhaps you need better job profiles. Or maybe, it’s not clear or obvious to you.

I’ve identified by recruiting challenge, now what?

Once you know what you need to fix, it makes it easier to build a solution. The first option is an obvious one – if you can identify the problem, you may be able to solve it in-house. But when you can’t identify the problem or don’t know how to fix it, there are lots of options for getting creative with your recruiting model. When it comes to working with recruiting providers for your direct hire roles, you can:

  • Find a full-cycle recruiting partner for help for one position.
  • Hand over all of your hiring from start to finish.
  • Break up recruiting by the skill sets you hire or by geographic regions.
  • Unbundle the recruiting process to get help in one area like sourcing or screening.
  • Bring in on-demand help for projects like opening up a new office/branch or launching a new product.
  • Blend any of the above!

Building a Recruiting Solution

With the complicated and diverse nature of recruitment challenges, creative solutions will help meet hiring objectives. If you’re interested in a free recruitment assessment to identify your recruiting challenge, connect with CBI Group today.

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