Posts Tagged: employment


7 Ways to Increase Your Value to Potential Employers

May 7th, 2018

So, you worked hard in college, earned a degree and now you’re ready to step out into the workforce. Guess what? More than a million Americans graduate with a college degree each year.  How do you impress a prospective recruiter? What steps can you take to stand out?

Use the following tips to differentiate yourself from the large pool of job seekers.

 

#1: Gain the appropriate experience

Have you completed an internship in your specialization? If not, find one that builds your skills and expertise. Most recruiters prefer experienced candidates. If you can come to an interview with experience that other candidates do not have, you will separate yourself from the pack.

 

#2: Be a problem solver

The world is full of problems, but very few problem solvers. It doesn’t matter which career path you decide to pursue, problem solvers are in short supply. It’s impossible to know every answer, but if you’re someone who knows how to find the right answer or solution, employers will be lining up to hire you.  Be a problem solver.

 

#3: Volunteer

Companies are seeking hard working employees that care about people. Invest time in others. Help to make the world a better place. Most employers started their company in order to solve a problem. Taking action to make the world a better place can resonate with a prospective employer. It also shows positive moral values and selflessness.  Both are necessary to be successful in business and life.

 

 

 #4: Write an impressive Resume

Your resume is one of the biggest tools you have to market your job skills. It should look clean, organized and highlight your strengths as a potential candidate. Recruiters look through dozens of resumes a day. In order to stand out, don’t be afraid to add a little bit of your personality. You want to be the person your recruiter remembers when they evaluate resumes for interviews.

 

 #5: Be active online

The internet contains the largest collection of ideas and information in the world. Even if you graduated top of your class, technology and trends change at breakneck speeds and your skills (and future employer) will suffer if you are not consistently learning. Join social media groups and professional forums to stay updated on best practices and industry trends in your profession.  

 

  #6: Write a persuasive cover letter

Write a cover letter that best describes your education, skills, and abilities. Let the employer know why you are the best fit for the job. Indicate some significant problems you solved in the past and how you can solve similar problems if you are hired. Don’t be afraid to add personality to your cover letter.  Recruiters have seen hundreds (if not thousands) of cover letters, but they’ve never met anyone like you. Use your cover letter to show employers who you are.

 

#7: Impress at the job interview

Job interviews are a lot like first dates.  You want to look your best, feel your best, and get to know your prospective employer. Remain confident, but humble. Explain how your current skills pertain to the job you are applying for. Recruiters are trained to interview people and weed out the elite, from everyone else.  Research every company you interview with and set yourself apart from other job seekers.

 

Are you a job seeker or an employer interested in staffing solutions? Do you have tips/tricks to help separate someone from the pack? Comment below!

Why Identifying Hiring Roadblocks is the Answer to Hiring Challenges

November 30th, 2016

Most professional struggles with time management, even the most successful organizations. There are an infinite amount of things to do in any given day, and some challenges are prioritized over another. However, when it comes to hiring, it’s hard to imagine a successful business without a successful workforce plan. If you’re having trouble finding or retaining good talent, start asking some tough questions to avoid wasting time, money, and great employees.

Do you really know what you’re looking for?

In this market where loyalty is low and demands are high, it’s easy to think a lot talent management is outside of your control. But hiring is all about aligning your expectations with the candidate’s outlook. Once completely honest with the current workforce dynamics, you can start to see certain red flags that are not helping the situation. For example, if you’re willing to ignore an IT candidate’s cultural challenged in favor of their talent, then you have to expect it might not work out for the team long-term.

3d worker with hand on roadblock, barricade

Are you thinking long-term?

Hiring managers must take into account both the stress they place on staff when they’re in need of talent, and the potential problems that come from hiring someone who may not be the best candidate simply because the need is so great. Both factors are important, but contradict each other. If its beginning to take entirely too long to identify someone is that is a fit, it could be time to reassess how the hiring process is being executed.

Can you find the talent on your own?

Sometimes managers just don’t have the resources to identify talent, vet their resumes, sit down for multiple interviews and then deliberating over the final decisions. Generally speaking, fatigue will set in somewhere along the way, causing people to skip or half complete one of the steps. Partnering with recruitment firm can make all the difference, but it’s pivotal to find a partner who not only has connections, but can also really understand the role both skill set wise, and culturally. It’s possible to outsource every part of the process, or just bits and pieces, but a recruiting partner can provide great value, and a specialized expertise.

CBI Way: More Jobs, More Candidate Engagement

September 10th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

Recently, the idea of an improving economy and job environment  has been mentioned often, with the support of statistics released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Along with the aforementioned numbers, we’ve spoken to the challenges of sourcing and recruiting within a changing employer/employee market. To support strategic sourcing techniques, there are a few ways to keep potential candidates (and customers) engaged while there are 4.7 million open jobs.

That’s right. According to the BLS, there were 4.7 million open jobs on the last day of July, 2014. That is more than any time since February, 2001. The increasing number of open jobs has also led to the lengthiest time-to-fill average nationally in thirteen years at 24.9 days, according to Dice Holdings, Inc. recent survey.

ID-100249000We are all aware that time is money, and time-to-fill is a critical metric when recruiting. A great way to cut down on the time-to-fill a job, continuous engagement with the candidate and customer, should be a point of emphasis. Specifically, those passive candidates, who again, have other options with 4.7 million jobs currently open. Keep the candidate involved in the process, don’t let them slip away and let your job contribute to that lengthy average time-to-fill. Respond quickly, keep them informed, and help your candidate understand the process. Keeping a candidate guessing is a great way to lose interest, think, “more is always better” when considering engagement with passive candidates.

Candidate engagement isn’t alone when trying to cut down on a lengthy time-to-fill. The customer can also become “lost”, and keeping your customer completely engaged should not be overlooked. In the next CBI Way blog, we’ll explore how to keep the customer engaged, and the factors than can be influenced otherwise.

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

CBI Way: Strategically Sourcing for Success

August 13th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton 

It’s well known that sourcing is an integral part of any recruitment strategy, the groundwork for generating quality candidate pools and identifying top talent. In the last CBI Way blog we discussed the growing trend of passive sourcing, coinciding with decreasing unemployment and a large number of jobs added. Passive sourcing is strategic, it takes time, and a well thought out plan. An essential technique in sourcing passive candidates is promoting the opportunity through your network, not just targeting those individuals who might be a great fit.

ID-100164388Promoting your opportunity includes reaching out to varying professionals. Creating excitement, generating interest, and establishing relationships with individuals who you feel may be that quality talent you are looking for is effective, but strategic sourcing is about thinking outside of the box as well. For instance, who might be the professionals in your network who tend to work with the type of people who would be interested in the opportunity? Are you searching for an architect with experience in hi-tech industries? Try connecting with electrical engineers who have worked on pharmaceutical or medical laboratories. Ask for their expertise and suggestions for identifying qualified individuals. Sure, they’re not an architect, and neither are you; but, chances are they have worked closely with professionals in that field during their career.

Thinking critically and objectively when strategically sourcing is key to success. There is more than one way to obtain the information for which you are looking. It is easy to think about a new requisition with a singular focus on that specific talent. But that individual is not always right in front of you, and finding alternative methods and sources of great information can be the difference between impressing the client, and underwhelming them.

Outside-In® Culture Series: Hiring Strategy

August 6th, 2014

Never stop working on your culture. This is very hard to do when there is other work to be done in leadership. Just look around—every part of your business needs culture work. If you need a way to evaluate this just stand at your office entrance and work backwards. Here is a hint—culture is everywhere. Culture shows up in how you hire, retain, recognize, reward, and even let go of talent! Let’s start at the front door. You need to hire employees to maintain a business. Hiring employees is the perfect place to work on culture! Think about it.

A business and its leaders work very hard to know what skills and experiences are needed for an open position. This is not easy and getting it right takes time. Who has it? Does your job description or profile speak to how someone must behave? What values matter to all of your employees?

ID-100262401A business also works hard to attract quality talent. These are the basics of talent acquisition. Companies hire recruiters internally, outsource to companies like mine, and hire temps. There are many strategies to produce the work that is need to find talent, identify the sources for talent, and to get the work done. However, getting the work done has nothing to do with how your organization presents itself to the marketplace. You know you’re a great place to work and there are unique and extraordinary reasons why someone would want to choose your company over another. If you’re not clear about your culture and your values how can you screen talent and know if they are a fit in your world?

You post on a job board for an opening. Does the posting simply tell about the role or does it culturally sell your company?

During the interview process we ask behavioral questions and leaders screen for technical competence. However, there is a real opportunity to screen for culture. The questions depend on your values (common theme) and how you will frame them. If you’re a small business you probably want to ask questions about working independently or how applicants go about making decisions. If your culture is one of structure and compliance or safety then build your questions accordingly. Companies screen and hire for technical fit, however, our hiring failures often relate to fit on the team or in the work environment! Try hiring someone fiercely independent in a team culture. Good Luck.

Make sure you keep the sofa full. This is a cultural Burkhardism that has been written about and is a whole chapter in books on hiring right! Do you look for talent all of the time? Do you have your next hire sitting on the sofa in your lobby? This is a metaphor of course. Hiring takes time, money, energy, and resources. Committing to these things in a structured, proactive way enables us to hire cultural fits.

When the sofa is not full, we hire fast and we hire wrong. Hiring the wrong person is costly—slow the process down. Consider six or nine months of a person’s salary as the cost of turnover. When we cut corners and just hire to fill a seat we fail and cost the company money!

Finally, consider hiring for culture over technical abilities. This is coming from the Outside-In® Guy who runs an entire company based on values. This could be considered radical and I hope so. Hiring for attitude and behaviors (the real source of culture) is a sure fire way to build talent that fits. Many or most roles can teach the rest.

Need a culture hiring review? Can you afford not to? Can you ever stop working on culture? I say no!

CBI Way: Employment Situation and Talent Acquisition

July 16th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton 

The recent June employment situation released early this month has shed some new light on the workforce changes occurring since the new year. Another 288,000 jobs (predicted) were added in June, marking the fifth consecutive month more than 200,000 were added. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, this is the first time since September, 1999 to January 2000, this has happened, almost fifteen years ago. Additionally, the 1.4 Millions jobs added in the first half of 2014, is also the highest number since the first half of that same year, 1999. Equally impressive is the unemployment rate of 6.1%, which has fallen 1.4% over the past year, the sharpest year-to-year decline in almost three decades, according to the BLS. While exciting, the report not only tells us something about the improving job market, but also speaks to the evolving and challenging world of sourcing and recruiting. In this CBI Way Blog, let’s first discuss the groundwork, sourcing.

ID-10098602More jobs and a lower unemployment rate means less candidates who are actively pursuing a new opportunity. As a refresher, active candidate sourcing is related to those candidates that are unhappy, concerned with their job security, or unemployed, for example. Active candidates are easier to find, as not only are they likely looking for you, the employer, but you are searching for them. Resumes are easy to find and applications aplenty. On the other hand, those candidates which are happy, fully employed, and not thinking about possibly making a move, prove much more difficult to identify, but are often the type quality talent being sought.

Passive sourcing is about generating interest, creating excitement, and establishing relationships, and networking with candidates about the opportunity. Whether by phone, email, or social networks, passive sourcing requires a focus on the candidate. Creating a strategy of who to target, where to target, and HOW to target these individuals is key. Where are they in their career? What sparks their interest? Who may they know? These are some questions that could potentially help with marketing your opportunity and employer brand in the best way possible. Still not interested? Make sure to express your desire to help if they may ever be in the market, or if anything changes in their career. The stronger network you have, the more options available to proactively source and engage the marketplace of talent.

CBI Way: The Candidate/Applicant Experience

June 19th, 2013

Guest blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, Recruiter On-Demand and Managed Staffing Practice Leader

There is a lot out there today on improving the candidate or applicant experience, speeding up the time it takes for applying on-line, integrating systems so candidates (as they journey from applicant to employee) only need to type their name and address 3 times not 8, and (the one that makes HR and Recruiting professionals cringe) – the dreaded auto-response telling the candidate that just spent 45 minutes applying on line “Don’t call us, we’ll call you.”

So yes, automation and system improvements do help, but here’s how I try and think about the treatment of candidates:

1. Candidates you hire evolve into employees who often rise to management – keep in mind that this person could be your boss someday.

2. Candidates you don’t hire will have something to say to their friends in the same candidate pool. think of the best experience you have had when you didn’t get the job, that is most likely how you want someone to talk about their experience with your company.

3. Candidates with multiple job offers do consider the company where they had the best experience – where they were greeted on-time, got a bathroom break, had an agenda ready, didn’t get asked the same questions over and over again by each interviewer, ya’ll know the drill.

4. You were a candidate once, too! (And that auto-response letter really sucks.)

So be sure to remember the human aspect of Human Resources and the talent aspect of Talent Acquisition. If we only serve to drive the resources and acquisition components of our industry, instead of the people needed to fill the positions, we are not fulfilling the needs of our customers.  Automation and systemic tools serve to expedite the hiring process but at the end of the day our candidates are people with their own feelings, needs, and ambitions. Be Outside-In®, put yourself in the candidate’s shoes, and take into account all that’s involved in the candidate/applicant experience!

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

Isn’t Every Job Temporary?

September 7th, 2011

Sometimes seeing and acknowledging workforce and workplace change happens very slowly. For the past fifteen years there have been predictions that almost 50% of our total workforce will be contingent workers. To be specific, contingent means temporary, contractual labor, even seasonal and part-time workers.
 
We are not close to 50% yet, however, it seems with each economic business cycle the numbers edge upward. And you know what? I am beginning to wonder what ‘temporary’ means when it comes to jobs. But I will get back to that premise in a minute. First, let’s talk about the business side of the workforce.
 
Smart businesses have learned to manage their labor costs. Much attention and press has been given to our slow moving economy and the minimal job growth. Companies survived through the recession by trimming their “core” jobs and by reducing their contingent workers. In fact, from 2007 through mid-2009, the temporary workforce dove by 33.7% while the total private workforce dropped by just 5.8%, according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data in The Atlantic.
 
For years the staffing industry has been espousing the benefits of a “contingent workforce strategy.” The numbers from 2007-2009 are evidence that businesses could reduce their costs and were able to do so quickly. In other words, the plan worked. Typically cost comes into play, simply put, there are less employee benefit costs. And for most, cost is a driver for using “temps.” However, the real benefit has been flexibility. The flexibility to lower labor costs quickly. The flexibility to change your workforce overnight. The ability to NOT have to build a permanent Human Resources department to screen, qualify, hire and fire. And finally, the ability and flexibility to add skills and competencies for project work.
 
And the numbers support that. In 2010, employment in temporary help services rose by about 300,000 to 2.21 million, according to the BLS. “By 2012, contingent employment will have returned to 2008 levels,” says Dana Shaw, senior vice president for strategy and solutions at Staffing Industry Analysts in Mountain View, Calif.
 
Growth and decline and temporary jobs will happen as a part of smart business. But isn’t every job temporary anyway? Have you ever looked at the average tenure of leaders of public companies? Some studies support that they average a little over year. I know some contract work that is longer than that! Besides, think about your job. Yes, the one you are in right now. Think about how much project work there is with a beginning and an end. Think about how frequently you are challenged to do things that aren’t written in your job description. Businesses demand both productivity and a growth in skills from its workers.
 
Burkhard theory suggests that most people are congruent or right for their jobs just a few times a year. Companies change fast. Jobs evolve. We grow in interest and in skill, and our job might not. Or the job changes around us and we might not be capable or even interested in how it evolves. If you’re in a fast-growing company, skills and work experience will change faster than people can settle in. If your business is shrinking? Many employees become too experienced for their role.
 
It seems like just yesterday that we all wanted was to work for parental companies and retire with the gold watch after thirty years. Many of us lived through the “age of free agency” in the workforce and perhaps scoffed at it for our own careers. Change comes slowly. However, change does come. And perhaps we are beginning to realize that every job is in fact “temporary.”
 

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