Posts Tagged: recruitment


CBI Way: 5 Ways to Go Back to the Future of Sourcing

February 18th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewskibacktofuture

Grab those Nike power laces and your hoverboard, this blog’s about to go 88mph back to the future of sourcing. There’s no hiding from it—we live in a society where today’s technologies are tomorrow’s artifacts. We are spoiled by technology that is meant to make our lives easier but inherently makes us disconnected from interpersonal communication. Gone are the days of needles in the haystack, purple squirrels, and cold calls. The future of sourcing is all about genuine relationships, honest networking, and full engagement. Here are some tips and tricks to become a more proactive and efficient sourcer in a world that is rapidly changing. (Spoiler alert, Marty McFly: They might not be what you think!)

  • Be Engaged: Engagement is the word of the year, and I’m not talkin’ carats. (Although, if my future husband is reading this, here’s a hint: 1 carat princess cut pave.) Back to the topic. There are countless articles teaching readers how to be more engaged in both their work and personal lives. I’ve even read The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal to learn more about this popular topic only to find that I was certainly not as engaged as I had thought. Think about investing your energy rather than your time. After all, your time is worthless if you’re not giving it your full attention. So drink that Vitamin C, get off your smartphone, and devote your full attention to your candidate!
  • Know Your Brand. Be Your Brand: Are you considered an “All-Star Recruiter” via LinkedIn? So is the guy to your left. And the one to the right. In a world where a million recruiters are flooding the inboxes of candidates with stereotypical messages, how do you stand out? What’s your Unique Selling Proposition? Remember that you’re representing your company and that you’re an extension of its brand, an embodiment if you will. This one probably sounds like a given, but too many recruiters come across as phony or robotic and it’s important to distance yourself from that stigma and be authentic and genuine. Seriously. Take mom’s advice and just be yourself.
  • Value Quality > Quantity: Anyone can tell you that it’s in your long-term interest to reach out to 10 dream candidates rather than 100 so-so’s whose resumes contain one measly keyword of your search. However, many recruiters find themselves disregarding this practice simply because it’s easier and they want to yield high numbers. Use your time wisely and harbor sincere interactions with stellar candidates. You’ll be thanking yourself when the next job order comes in and you already have an A+ pool to choose from.
  • Build Relationships: How many quality candidates have you sourced today? Big deal. This week? Zzz. Can you list their names? All of them? Probably not. Make your candidates feel valuable—don’t treat them like another billable to fill a position. Think about how you would want to be treated. You should be having consistent, responsive interactions with candidates that help you climb that relational ladder. Be open and transparent throughout the process—take the time to get to know each candidate and their personality. This will help you tremendously in finding the right fit for both your candidate and client. Also, be sure to follow up with each candidate!
  • Keep Up with Technology (1.21 Gigawatts!): While in the beginning I mentioned being spoiled by technology, I didn’t mean throw it away altogether! Find your perfect balance of using today’s best sources to build genuine relationships. The technology world as we know it is changing rapidly—how will you adapt? As we have learned from the dinosaurs, you either evolve or you are reduced to only being a three year old’s birthday party theme. It doesn’t take a DeLorean to stay current with sourcing strategies, technologies, and best practices. All you have to do is stay active by consistent training and searching for invaluable information. Spend a little bit of time each with with a cup of coffee and a couple sourcing blogs & articles. Trust me, a little goes a long way. Find something good? Be sure to share it with your team! You’ll actually be saving time in the long run AND you’ll be well ahead of the game.

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices. 

CBI Way: 5 Strategic Reasons to Use a Contract Recruiter

December 4th, 2013

A Contract Recruiter is not a new concept. Companies work with contract recruiters for many tactical reasons. Extended leave, summer vacation and maternity leave are all tactical reasons to hire a contract recruiter for a short period of time. But there are also many strategic reasons to use a Recruiter On-Demand service model. At CBI Group, we help customers view their talent acquisition departments and hiring plans strategically. Here are five ways customers use contract recruiters strategically.

  1. Product Launch: If your company is launching a new product or service, you may need the assistance of a contract recruiter to augment your existing recruiting team. Likely you’ll need to bring on the right technical skill sets to build your product or service, and once the new product is ready, you will need a sales force expansion program.
  2. Opening New Location: Is your company growing and expanding to new locations? If you are opening up a new location, businessmen-152572_640whether it’s in the same city or town, or somewhere else in North America – you’ll have an increase in requisitions until you fill the jobs for that location. This is a great opportunity to bring on a contract recruiter for your specific hiring goals.
  3. Hiring Peaks, Rapid Growth: Some companies don’t need a new product or location to experience rapid growth. All businesses experience ups and downs in hiring and a contract recruiter is a flexible option that is the best way to smooth out the peaks and valleys of workforce demand.
  4. Hiring for a Specific Business Unit: Many times, corporate HR teams feel confident in their recruiting ability for the most part, but sometimes struggle with hiring for a specific business unit. Companies can bring on a contract recruiter with specialty or niche experience to recruit just for that unit, and still keep the rest of the TA internal. Whether IT recruiting, Sales hiring, or Finance is your sore spot, contract recruiters provide you with expertise and results while keeping headcount and budget in line.
  5. An Acquisition or Divestiture: Organizing, merging, and restructuring HR departments can be confusing and difficult during an acquisition or divestiture. CBI Group contract recruiters can handle the HR side of things for a short-term or long-term period of change.

Connect with CBI Group to learn more about our Recruiter On-Demand service.

Building Blocks of RPO Solutions – Post-Implementation Success

November 19th, 2013

Over the course of a couple months, our RPO blog series has taken us from detailing benefits and types of Recruitment Process Outsourcing solutions, through best practices for full implementation. In between, we discussed the “building blocks” of a solution; including, identifying the business challenge, developing a specific project solution, and establishing a Service Level Agreement (SLA). Once implemented, the RPO engagement may be primed for success, but working to ensure sustainability and maintain progress through the partnership is imperative.

As discussed in CBI Way: Building Blocks of RPO Solutions, the SLA is vital for maintaining and improving efficiency and quality.  The SLA defines the performance measurements, services, expectations, and guarantees for which each partner is accountable when engaging in a recruitment process outsourcing project.  As a reminder, additional details for a project’s SLA include:  key metrics, communication plan, and roles outlined with responsibilities. Specifically, reporting can undoubtedly help determine how the process is progressing and where there is room for improvement. Another benefit of staying true to the SLA’s reporting of key metrics is having the ability to gain, as well as provide, strategic insight into the current recruiting process.

human-65931_640For example, a report by the vendor detailing how many candidates were sourced, screened, submitted, and interviewed, can be utilized to analyze time-to-fill and quality of sourced candidates. Showing an area of the process where the numbers are low with perhaps a less than favorable ratio of sourced candidates to interviewed candidates would be very valuable. A poor ratio would detail a needed improvement in quality of the candidates initially sourced, possibly revisiting the sourcing strategy. As part of that improvement, routine meetings with hiring managers must continue to be an integral part of preserving a successful engagement. Communication is fundamental to keep both parties informed and accountable as the project continues to move along.

An RPO relationship that is properly managed and maintained after implementation delivers a customized component to the recruiting process that can be invaluable. Continued communication, reporting, tracking, and anything detailed in a properly planned SLA can also help educate both parties, further increasing the chances of a smooth, productive, and beneficial RPO partnership. With a clearly outlined business challenge, detailed project plan, well-planned Service Level Agreement, and continuous improvement after implementation, there is a much higher probability of a successful RPO engagement.

9/11 and the Resilience of the American Worker

September 11th, 2013

911Guest blog spot by Kelly Murray, Marketing Coordinator

Twelve years ago, our country sustained a tragedy so shocking that it rattled each American citizen to their core. We will always remember where we were the morning of 9/11, and the horror we witnessed as two landmarks of international commerce fell at the hands of terrorists. Thousands of lives were claimed that day but in turn, millions of Americans were united under the strength of our nation and a vow to Never Forget those lost.

As the years go on, 9/11 etches its place into American history and its symbolism grows. I was only thirteen when the World Trade Center fell, and at the time I struggled to comprehend what this blow meant to our country on an international scale. I understood the degree of death and destruction that had occurred and felt the confusion, fear, and grief that any little girl would at the time. Years later, now a young working professional, when I look back on 9/11, I am struck by the resilience our nation had to have in order to pick up the pieces and move forward – not only emotionally, but as a political and economic entity.

When hit with unexpected hardship, whether emotional or professional, it’s difficult to maintain focus on the job and push forward. Of course, the events of 9/11 exceeded any difficulty one could have expected to endure. However, I think its important to note that as Americans, both our humanity and work ethic were tested on 9/11. The al-Qaeda chose to destroy a symbol of international trade and commerce (as well as a symbol of defense and national security, the Pentagon) that day. The burden of strength in the eyes of adversity fell on our political leaders, but also on the American worker: corporate executives, entrepreneurs, young professionals, entertainers, laborers – no profession or discipline was spared. We had to dig deep and continue working to carry each other through.

As an entrepreneur, CBI Group’s president felt this burden especially hard that day, when his company opened its doors for the first time on the morning of September 11th. And yet, he and his employees, like many, had to press on and focus on creating business, even if it felt ‘wrong’ or ‘inappropriate’ to do so during a time of such great loss. Each year at CBI Group, this day is met with a bittersweet sentiment: as a celebration of another year in business met with a solemn reminder of a national tragedy. Over a decade later, we continue to operate successfully and help businesses fill jobs, recruit employees, and develop their workforce – a reflection of the resilience of an entrepreneur and his country.

So, this article is simply a testament to the American worker, for rising up and pushing forward in times of turmoil. Since 9/11, our nation has struggled economically and suffered the impact of war, but we have pressed on. In the American spirit, our country has rebuilt (quite literally, the National September 11th Museum and Memorial opened in 2011) and reclaimed our place as an economic force.

To all those lost and affected by the tragedy of 9/11, we honor and remember you. As citizens, we will never forget what happened that day and the toll it took on our country. As workers, we will continue to push forward and keep the American Dream alive…a notion that drives the belief that in America anything is possible and anyone can find success – if they work hard enough for it.

CBI Way: 5 Hidden Responsibilities of a Recruiter

July 25th, 2013

Guest blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, Recruiter On-Demand and Managed Staffing Practice Leader

Job Description

You want to be a recruiter when you grow up? Really? Sounds great! You will play matchmaker getting great people the job of their dreams! You will help companies identify the talent they need to launch their next product, make their sales numbers, lead their operation, and manage their corporate accounting and risk! You will use behavioral and psychological techniques to crawl inside the minds of your recruits and get the perfect cultural fit for the teams you support!

Yes, you will do all of this – and it’s often why so many of us choose a career in Talent Acquisition, but below are a few items that never seem to show up on the recruiter’s job description that are just as much a reality in today’s world:

1. You will be a vendor/partner manager. Yes, you are the best at what you do, but you need technology and helping hands to do it. You will handle agreements with job boards, ATS providers, contingent workforce/staffing firms, and the occasional search recruiter who happens to be the COO’s nephew. Make sure you sharpen your negotiating skills!

2. You will have to talk to candidates’ moms and spouses! Yes, it has happened. Be ready for the call from Mom asking why little Betty did not get the job and that what showed up on her background check happened two years ago…  The recruiting, and certainly the relocation process, is a family affair.

3. You will have to know when to say no… So your client says, “This job is impossible to fill. It has been open for 18 months.” If you are a corporate recruiter do you spend your own, and additionally, your candidates’ time for the next year and a half trying to fill that impossible job? If you are an agent/search recruiter do you take their money and not deliver? This is a classic No – in this situation, it’s time to work with your client to review the requirements and/or have the discussion that this is not really an open requisition.

4. You will become a wardrobe expert. Ever watch What Not to Wear? If you do, take a note from Stacy and Clinton because you too must be able to tell your candidate how to dress, and which piercings, earrings, nose rings, and even tongue rings to not wear to the second round of interviews.

5. You will learn to expect the unexpected. We live in a world of products and services, and as a recruiter your products and services are your candidates. In this role, you will quickly realize how unpredictable people can be with their diverse opinions, habits and preferences – you’ll catch on to expect the unexpected!

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

CBI Group Recruiter Sees Networking as Path to Your Next ‘Great Adventure’

May 10th, 2013

One of the most influential ways to approach a job search is through networking.  But how and why invest your time in networking?

“In 2012, networking accounted for more than one in four hires at major companies, the most of any strategy used in job hunting,” says David Vander Does, President of the National Search Advisory and a Recruitment Consultant with Gore Medical Products and CBI Group.  “And if a candidate has a referral from inside a company, he/she is 70 times more likely to be hired than a candidate without this connection,” Dave adds, referring to a finding published by Career Xroads.

So how do you network?  Where do you start and what are the tools to help you?

“Networking is all about relationship-building.  It’s who you know and who they know that can really make the difference in your search” Dave says.

The first step is to make a list of current and prospective contacts.  “Think about the relationships that you already have (family, friends, previous co-workers, etc…) and add them to your list.  Then do your research and identify others that you need to know (company contacts, business leaders, others in your profession) and add them to your list.   Think beyond the obvious, be strategic,” Dave advises.

There are lots of tools to use in building your network with www.LinkedIn.com as one of the best places to start.  “If you don’t already have a LinkedIn presence, establish one,” Dave says.  “This serves as your professional profile for recruiters, hiring managers and all the current and potential people in your network.  Think of it this way: if you don’t have a presence on LinkedIn, you don’t exist.”

Once you’re on LinkedIn, you can conduct searches by company name, industry, through current and former co-workers and through your network of LinkedIn contacts that you should be continuously growing.  Similarly, using search engines like Google can provide great insight into your field, and help you identify prospective companies and professional associations.

Dave says your next step is to divide your list of contacts into three groups: warm (people who know who you are and can give you a good reference), casual (people you may need to reconnect with) and cold contacts (people you haven’t met yet, but you need to meet). “This will help you prioritize and maximize your efforts as you begin to work your network”

Develop a database or a spreadsheet with of course names, titles, e-mail addresses, etc. but then leave a column for “Notes” where you can track of your progress with each networking target.

Now you’re ready to get out there and network. Dave says to practice these four steps with each person you meet:

1.  Make them aware that you are looking for your next “adventure”

2.  Guide their thinking about what that “adventure” could be

3.  Be confident and specific

4.  Give them permission to share your name or resume as they see fit

Dave also encourages job hunters and net-workers to develop a script and practice in your home or office.  “For most, networking can be overwhelming and frightening.  But remember, it’s really nothing more then the act of building relationships one contact at a time.  The more you do it; the easier it becomes.”  Keep these elements in mind:

1.  Intro- who am I and why am I calling or e-mailing?

2.  Your mission- I’m pursuing my next best adventure and thought you could help…

3.  Give them permission to say “no.”

4.  Provide something of value in return.

5.  The sensational close- share your plans for follow-up and ask if you can keep in touch.

“Most people will encourage you to stay in touch… do-so, you’d be surprised at how many people never get in touch with these prospects again,” Dave says.

When reaching out to a networking prospect you haven’t met, start with an e-mail introducing yourself and making a connection (Our mutual friend Sam Jones suggested I contact you; we attended xx college at the same time, I’m also a member of your professional association…). Then state your purpose and tell them when you’ll follow-up.  Then when you call, say “I’m following up on the e-mail I sent you on…this process helps to eliminate the “cold call””

Remember to say thank you. “People in jobs today are busier than ever and even if they only give you five minutes, it’s important that you acknowledge their time,” Dave points out.  “And if they help you make a good connection, let them know how grateful you are.”

And remember; always try to provide value in return.“Good relationships are not one sided; do what you can to help others in your network in return for the help they provided to you. It makes all the difference and will help to strengthen your network for the future.”

CBI Way: How to Handle Hiring Bias

April 17th, 2013

CBI Way blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, Recruiter On-Demand and Managed Staffing Practice Leader

So as a recruiter your #1 goal is to find the best fit for a position. You assess the position requirements, responsibilities, team and company cultural fit and interpersonal interactions with the manager and the team, you begin recruiting against all these hard and soft responsibilities, and find the perfect person. How’s that for a happily ever after?

So what happens when this top candidate gets in front of the hiring manager and the message back to you is: I want someone younger/older/male/female? We all have or will have to face this at some point. Below are three suggestions on what to do when the inevitable occurs:

1.      Ask why - There are sometimes valid (and lawful) reasons to ask for an otherwise protected characteristic. For example, if the job requirement is to model women’s dresses, the most ideal candidate may very well be a woman, or if a job is to design apps targeted for the under 30 market’s use, a Millennial may be the most qualified candidate. It never hurts to ask questions to gain clarity.

2.      Educate – In the absence of a valid reason, it is always recommended you educate (teach don’t preach!) your hiring management about non-discriminate hiring and most importantly the value to the organization of having diverse teams. (Start by reminding them their clients are diverse!)

3.      State your purpose and get back to the first sentence – your job is to find the best fit for the position — to enable the new hire’s, team’s and company’s success! If the first two suggestions don’t yield any traction from your hiring manager, it might just be best to go back to the drawing board and find the best fit!

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

CBI Way: Managing the Nightmare Candidate

February 27th, 2013

CBI Way blog spot by Glenn Koetz, Search Practice Lead and Lisa Van Ess, Outside-In® Group Lead

We have all had those days when we are sitting with our trusted colleagues talking about the nightmare candidate who came to the interview with a bulls-eye tattooed on his forehead, or the one whose answer to “Why would you like to work for us?” is “I am eating dog food at this point and will have to change to cat food if I don’t get a job”, or the one whose interview turns into a disaster right from the start. We all chuckle and agree that if we wrote a book on what we have seen throughout the candidate management process, we would make millions and could all retire… Yet sometimes in that same conversation we actually get to the, “Well, how did you handle that?”, and the wisdom shared at that point is a rare gift.

One of my favorite sayings is “You can’t manage crazy.” Unfortunately, if you have chosen a career in HR or recruiting you are called upon to do just that. Here are some proven tactics I have found helpful in managing Candidate Crazy.

Remember, as a recruiting professional you have the ability to say No.

This means you can tell the person who comes in for the interview with the bulls-eye on their forehead, “No, you are not meeting with the hiring manager.” It is up to you to screen out candidates and not waste your hiring manager’s time. In this case, I took the time to meet with this individual and tell him that the position required the quick building of face-to-face relationships in a very conventional firm and that he would be better suited to work in a more casual environment; mentioning both he and the company would be happier. The candidate thanked me, we parted ways and all lived happily ever after…

Educate, coach, and use a personalized No Thank You letter if needed.

For my dog food gal…she was a really talented, experienced candidate who made it beautifully through the phone and in-person recruiting interviews. When she got in front of the decision makers – the dog food versus cat food answer was the one she gave when asked why she wanted to work for the company. I called her to let her know she did not get the job and specifically why. I will tell you that I was very sympathetic and agreed to present her to another hiring manager with the coaching, even direction that she answer the question with why working that job for that company was important to her – we even rehearsed her answers. (File this under no good deed goes unpunished).

Fast forward to interview number two: Interviewer: “Why do you want this job at our company?” Dog food Gal: “To keep me and my kids from living in a refrigerator box in an alley.” This is when the call explaining to the candidate she did not get the job (and why) is followed by the specific No Thank You Letter to ensure that they understand they will not be coached any further and that the official rejection is required.

Maintain control when an interview starts to unravel.

And then, there are always those interviews that are complete disasters right from the start. The candidate comes in an hour and a half after the scheduled time and fails to communicate that they’re running late…or the candidate becomes emotionally unstable halfway through the interview because they realize they are not going to make it through to the next round…or maybe, the candidate becomes desperate and starts to beg you to review their resume credentials when both parties know the damage has already been done.

In these situations, it’s important to communicate to this person that the mistakes they’ve made, can be used as lessons learned or motivation for their next job interview. If they’re going to be late, they ought to communicate it! There’s nothing worse than a no-show, without any reason for it, right? When emotions get out of hand, its important to remind them that this interview is not the end-all be-all, and that the reason they are not moving forward is not because of something they lack. And finally, when it comes to credentials, (this scenario is often found most with recent college grads or young professionals), tell them that its about their potential value and capacity to grow within an organization that’s important, not always what they’ve already accomplished. Reinforcement is key to managing this type of nightmare candidate.

I am sure we have all been on either or both sides of this, the moral to the story is to take a proactive, openly communicative position with all your candidates to ensure the very best time, energy and matches among hiring managers and hire-ees!

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

CBI Way: Enhance the Interview Experience

December 5th, 2012

CBI Way blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, Outside-In® Group Lead

Have you ever interviewed for a job, met with five people (four are late), one reads your resume in front of you, and – get this – all five ask the same exact questions circa the 1990’s? Wow! Everyone already knows your strengths and weaknesses! They even know why there is a three year break in work on your resume! You leave thinking, “Why did I bother coming in at all?!

Yes, I have had that interview, too.

One of the great things about CBI Group is that we view our candidates and our applicants as our customers. Therefore, we work to make sure the type of interview experience mentioned above does not happen within our conference room walls. So let me ask you this, as a recruiting professional, how often do you think of the hiring manager as the client? Candidates are probably viewed as inventory, right? Well, if they are, they shouldn’t be….

There is a lot of hype in the ATS community about the Applicant Experience. The movement considers everything from the time it takes to apply online for a position, to the number of times duplicate data entry is performed, to those horrible “Thanks but no thanks. Your resume is on file.” automated responses. So what if you are not the CTO and are dealing with some restrictions on the automated front? Let’s not forget good, old fashioned human touch. Let’s look at planning the interview process.

Here’s a simple and effective way to enhance your client’s and candidates’ interview experiences:

  1. Have an agenda. Make sure each interviewer has a subject to cover with the applicant.
  2. Provide sample questions to each interviewer. These sample questions should be different and unique. This ensures that the hiring decision is made from a fully informed, and well-rounded collection of  perspectives, covering all aspects of the job and cultural requirements.
  3. Leave time for questions.  Give the applicant time to ask questions and/or to wrap-up.
  4. Enclose a rating form for the interviewers. This will accelerate the speed of decision making. Speedy decision making makes applicants happy!
  5. Enclose an Interview Experience Form for the applicant to share with the interview team. (Uh oh! Peer pressure and a little friendly competition to consider!)

Taking one (or all) of these steps will markedly improve the applicant experience. While an interview does not guarantee that the applicant will get the offer – it may mean that they are not the “right person, right now”.  However, your candidate may very well become a paying customer, vendor, partner, or competitor in the future, so be sure to leave every applicant with a great experience.

The CBI Way blog series explores the technology tools used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

Hiring Under Duress: How to Avoid Making a Bad Hire

September 12th, 2012

Guess blog post by Lisa Van Ess, CBI Group team member

OK, we’ve all done this. Admit it, we all have this story. Sometimes it stays hidden away, locked in the closet: the embarrassing ’lesson learned’ that we diligently strive to never, ever repeat again. Other times, we share the story with others to try and save them from making the same mistake, but shockingly, history does sometimes repeat itself! Some of us, when we share the various responsibilities of HR, Recruiting, and Team Leadership, may still be painstakingly unraveling all the fun that comes in the aftermath of making the bad hire, the gift that may keep on giving for weeks and months to come…

Most commonly, the reasons I have seen or (gasp!) participated in making a bad hire under duress, fall into the following categories:

  • Time -”We must fill this job yesterday!” Whether or not someone vacated the position suddenly or a promise was made to a client for an immediate start, one of the primary root causes really, simply is time.
  • Energy -The hiring manager is also doing the job responsibilities of the ‘vacant’ position and is burned out, stick a fork in him, he is done and will settle for anyone who fogs up a mirror when you hold it in front of their face just to get the work off his plate.
  • Relationships -”The potential hire worked for me or for someone I really respect back in the early 80′s and they were totally, totally awesome 20 years ago!”

Recognize any or all of the above? Yeah, me, too!

So, what can we do as recruiting leaders? The solutions really are simple:

1) Slow down. Slow your client down and reset time-to-fill expectations. This means not settling, this can also mean making the call to say, “I need another two weeks to do this right. I don’t want to do it fast and risk presenting or making a bad or inferior hire.” It is important to get in front of this one early, don’t miss a delivery deadline THEN tell your hiring manager or client it will take longer. Engage in the conversation as soon as you see the issue arise. We often agree to challenging, even impossible deadlines (as recruiters we are a competitive, fast-paced bunch) with the intent to quickly help our clients and solve problems. Being candid and informative with your clients to allow the time to hire the right talent goes a much, much longer way than the I-beat-the-impossible-time-to-fill-deadline by 5 hours! Ever start someone pending the last 24 hours of a background check being complete? (C’mon, admit it, we all know that story – classic example of do it right vs. do it fast.)

2) Offer a contractor or consultant. Help this poor hiring manager manage their work and life with an interim solution while the search for full time talent continues! Oh, and if you negotiate a nice ‘contract-to-hire’ deal, the contractor just may be your hire.

3) People change. Really, they do. Sometimes they change for the better, sometimes for worse, sometimes they’re just different. Even if the potential candidate used to work for you, you worked for them and they taught you everything you know, was at your wedding or college graduation party and is a wonderful person (and they still are). Interview them anyway. Not only is it a great opportunity to catch-up, but you need to take the time to make sure the journey they have been on since you last worked with/for/near them is a match for the next stop on their journey: your current opening. Don’t deviate from your proven successful, consistent recruiting and hiring practices no matter who the candidate might be, and last (but not least) do make sure to complete your background check process and check current references.

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