Posts Tagged: recruitment


Understanding the Value of Workforce Productivity Metrics

November 23rd, 2016

While there are numerous ways to measure employee performance from a human resources standpoint, there is one metric that is most valued by company executives, particularly CFOs. This metric provides data that generally translates into dollars. It is simple to calculate and can allows comparison to other publicly listed firms in the same industry. It is one of the most effective way to measure both innovation and productivity in employees.

What is it?

This highly valued metric is revenue per employee (RPE). To calculate your company’s RPE, simply divide the total revenue of the company by the total number of employees. This calculation focuses on the value of the output of the workforce. Its relevancy is due to one of the largest expenses for most companies; salary and benefits of their employees.

Rear view of the business lady who is looking for the new business ideas. Blue growing arrow as a concept of successful business. Business icons are drawn on the concrete wall.

Why is it so effective?

It is an effective tool for measuring a workforce because companies are looking for the highest revenue per employee that they can get. Higher RPE translates to higher productivity levels and more effective use of the company’s available resources. By comparing RPE numbers over the years, businesses can also effectively evaluate their human resources team. Additionally, it can be a tool to assess how your company is doing compared to other similar companies. The top companies in any industry generally produce a higher revenue per employee number.

How can you increase your RPE?

Industry leaders tend to have the best RPEs. How do they do it? A lot depends on the industry, considering there is no one-size-fits-all solution to increasing RPE in the workforce. However, one rising trend throughout different industries is employee engagement. Employees that are engaged in their work are 38% more likely to have above average workplace productivity, per Workplace Research Foundation. This typically translates into higher service and customer satisfaction, increased sales and profit, and higher shareholder returns.

Another way to increase RPE is continued effort to hire highly skilled and qualified candidates. It has always been a challenge for HR departments to sort through piles of resumes and applications in search of the right candidate. However, many have found hiring solutions by utilizing a professional recruitment partner. Recruitment partners provide resources and training to help companies identify and hire highly skilled executives and employees that will help, not hinder, the company’s RPE.

Although there are numerous metrics that provide human resources departments with valuable information about workforce productivity, the one that could be considered most valued outside the HR department is revenue per employee. When it comes to workforce productivity, how well does your company measure up?

Developing Future Leaders with Talent Pools

November 16th, 2016

With thousands of baby boomers entering retirement each day, organizations are understandably looking for ways to retain and develop promising talent with future leadership potential. Along with the mass exodus of a vital part of the workforce, a potential wealth of knowledge is poised to leave along with them—and companies must find a way to transfer that knowledge to new and up-and-coming employees.

An effective talent strategy is necessary to keep an organization’s hiring processes running smoothly. Whether you are planning to replace an employee with a new hire or promote within the company, certain roles and responsibilities are better served when groomed from within the organization. This is especially true if the company can’t find qualified candidates to fill a vacancy or when the need for company-specific knowledge outweighs the value of bringing in a more qualified outside hire.

Internal development strategies that satisfy both the need to identify and notify applicable succession candidates can be challenging for even the most innovative talent acquisition teams. Talent pools can provide an effective solution when an organization isn’t in a position to single out any one employee as a future leader, or perhaps wants to build a talent pipeline outside of the business to be ready for future needs.

What is the Value of a Talent Pool?Kids in a Swimming Pool, children for summer season. Kid inflatable pool, child swimming in the pool, Vector Illustration

Talent pools can be comprised of high-potential employees who are being conditioned to take on more responsibilities and higher-level projects within the company, or talent identified from other companies who would be potential high value hires in the future. High-performing employees are fully engaged employees who embrace the corporate culture and constantly strive to perform their duties at a top-level.  These employees might also be considered high-potential employees who have expressed an interest in advancing within the organization along with possessing certain competencies and values that the organization desires in their leaders.

Talent pools help organizations prepare for succession by allowing the organization to develop a talent group made up of multiple promising individuals. If an organization is unsure about where or when it will have the need for future leaders, a talent pool affords the option of keeping a group of high-performing, high-potential employees ready for deployment should the need arise, or reach out to identified talent to field future interest in your company.

From an employee’s perspective, being part of a talent pool can be a reassuring step toward career advancement. Employees at this level know they are valued, they feel confident that they have a future with the company, and they are rewarded with the knowledge that their employer is consciously investing in their future leadership potential.

If your organization isn’t ready to start pinning down succession prospects, implementing a talent pool can be a great way to develop multiple skills in diverse groups of promising employees. While some staffing vacancies can be effectively filled by recruiting new talent, identified outside of the company, the future of the company’s leadership can also be successful by investing in high-performing and high-potential internal talent for future promotion.

How the Gig Economy Is Transforming The Workplace

November 9th, 2016

The gig economy has become one of the most persistent, diverse, and influential forces on our current marketplace. Its has spread far and wide and has transformed the market in a variety of ways that may surprise you.

Employment OptionsSet of hands with tools for design. Architect designer for project drawings. Architect hands with pencil and ruler. Architects workplace. Technical project. Have Exploded

The biggest way that the gig economy is transforming the workplace is the way it has rendered full-time jobs less prevalent. While there are still plenty of high-quality life-long jobs available to those who want them, the gig economy has broken apart the necessity for this kind of job and helped expand the employment possibilities for a large number of people.

For example, those who possess specialized skills are reaping huge benefits from the gig market. They are moving from job-to-job in a way that helps him or her define their own career, maximize their profits, and create a more independent lifestyle.

However, even low-skilled workers, such as those who lack higher education and no repair skills, have used the gig economy to change their lives for the better. For example, landscaping work has helped many create a sustainable and engaging career which would have been impossible in a full-time-job-oriented mind.

The Exponential Growth Of The Gig Economy

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that the gig economy has continued to expand at an almost exponential level. For example, in 2005, about seven percent of all workers were independent contractors or those who embraced the gig economy. They expect these numbers show huge growth when they survey again in 2017: perhaps as high as 15-20%.

More data gathered between 2003 and 2013 found that all industrial sectors had non-employer business growth i.e. gig jobs. Nearly one million new gig businesses or jobs were formed in that 10-year period, by far the largest of any other sector. Areas that experienced high growth included art and design, computer repair, information technology, construction, media, and transportation.

Why has the gig economy grown at such a high rate? It allows consumers to more easily match up with workers they respect. It also provides workers with a sense of freedom and independence that a singular full-time job cannot offer. While there are disadvantages (such as the dangers of inconsistent work and no employer-provided benefit packages), for many people the advantages outweigh the inconsistencies.

Employment Options Have Exploded For Stay-At-Home Moms

One interesting component of the gig marketplace is that it has helped stay-at-home moms break into a busy marketplace. Among the 43 percent of highly qualified women with children are choosing to raise their children at home, a growing number are performing gig jobs, such as online writing, transcription, and even tutoring, as a way of contributing to the household income.

In one study, it was revealed that the jobs like this not only help a stay-at-home mom contribute to the home financially, but provides her with engaging and enjoyable projects to keep a healthy work-life balance. It’s hard not to see that the gig economy is slowly and subtly transforming the marketplace in a variety of ways. Don’t be surprised to see the gig marketplace continue to grow in 2017.

Urban Office Locations Attracting IT Talent

November 2nd, 2016

 

Undoubtedly, there is a high demand for IT talent in the technology job market. Companies, both large and small, are competing for this relatively small pool of skilled IT workers. Therefore, many companies are doing anything in their power to attract IT talent. While many companies are choosing to offer impressive starting salaries and benefits to hired IT workers, other companies are deciding to take things a step further.

To be more competitive in attracting IT talent, companies are beginning to move their HQ or offices to the city.

Location has long been one of the most important factors when it comes to real estate. However, location has City skyline panorama illustration with businessman watching. City skyline corporate world. Skyline of a city for business background. Cityscape skyline with skyscrapers. City skyline banking symbol.now become a point of concern for businesses hiring IT workers. Young IT candidates who have extensive knowledge in the latest technologies prefer to live and work in urban settings. These workers prefer to take public transportation to work rather than drive to office locations in the suburbs. Accordingly, employers who desire workers versed in the newest skills are making changes to appeal to those who prefer to dwell in the city. Some companies have opted to transition from suburban to urban offices while other companies have private shuttles between headquarters and major cities.

A great example is the major city of Boston. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in Boston rose by 54,000 employees over the past 11 months. Just this year, General Electric moved its headquarters to Boston after being in Fairfield, CT since 1974. 

While more condensed and expensive spaces downtown may lead to some challenges for a business. Younger generation IT candidates are flocking to the city and aren’t motivated to make the move out to the suburbs. Urban cities offer short commutes, public transportation, and a significant opportunity for a ‘work/play’ lifestyle. 

Companies trying to attract the cream of the crop in the technology job market are taking advantage of urban office locations, following the talent pool to the sharp contrast of urban city skylines. 

Do you know help hiring IT talent? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450.

4 Reasons to Partner with Talent Experts to End 2016

October 26th, 2016

Each company has individual challenges and needs when it comes to meeting its talent recruitment objectives. When you hire a professional recruitment partner, these experts can take a close look at your the recruitment goals and work to build a customized talent sourcing plan and strategy. So how exactly can a recruiting partner help to close out 2016?

Market Knowledge

Talent Acquisition partner will know the candidate market just like a broker knows the stock market. This includes having a solid grasp of who the best talent is, knowing what their salary expectations will be, and understanding career expectations for a specific niche skill set. A candidate with a fantastic background doesn’t not sit around applying to job postings. These candidates are highly sought after, and usually well-known to a recruiting firm. Some might reach out to the best recruiters and get their name out there. This results in talent acquisition professionals having a consistent pulse on pools of talent that may be a fit for your openings.ID-100249468

Increase the Talent Pool

When businesses decide to try recruiting on their own, usually, they will only be able to reach a small portion of the talent pool. When companies put out ads, they will typically be receiving responses from people currently in the job market, receiving plenty of unqualified resumes. However a good recruiter, knows the best talent out there and will proactively reach out to passive candidates to to see if they have any interest. Don’t limit your talent reach by simply posting the job for active candidates to apply.

Candidate Screening

Screening candidates is a learned skill. Recruitment partners will take the vetting process a step further, and speak the multiple people who have not only supervised them but worked side by side with the potential candidate. Thorough screening and vetting is imperative to make sure the candidate is a good fit for the organization and reduces the likelihood of quick turnover.

Save Time

When managers and team leaders are tasked to lead  the hiring process, it takes away from time spent on tasks that will grow the business. If you’re without a Talent Acquisition team, a manager who is responsible for a key part of the organization. is spending their time looking through resumes and coordinating interviews. Recruiters are experts at weeding through applicants and making sure that only the best talent is put before the hiring manager. Not only will the recruiter screen the candidates for a skill set, they are also making sure they will be a good fit for your culture and goals for organizational growth.

Do you need help hiring, screening, sourcing, or just some recruitment strategy consulting? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450

How Smaller Businesses Can Attract Quality IT Talent

October 19th, 2016

Many companies experience difficulty attracting qualified information technology candidates. Specifically, smaller businesses face even more of a challenge. A rapid growth in the technology space has led to incredible value for even the smallest of businesses to invest in IT software and processes. In turn, IT talent has become increasingly in demand. From offering sky-high salaries and generous benefits, businesses are pulling out all of the stops to try to attract technology talent.Programmer at computer desk working on program design. Software concept. Vector illustration flat design. Man working at desktop computer laptop. Coding web technology. Development applications.

So what can small businesses do to beat their bigger competition for this niche pool?

Look internally and locally. While not all businesses have a robust IT department, it may be worth identifying any talent already in the company who would be able to step up. In addition, hiring from within cuts down on expenses related to training a new employee on business processes. Try partnering with local schools or programs to attract computer science majors, offering an exciting opportunity before the future candidate hits the open job market.

If your recruitment team has identified external candidates, its important to make quick decisions. Do not leave candidates dangling, he or she knows the demand for their skill set. IT candidates likely already have other offers and any delays give other companies an opportunity make the first move. High level professionals wont often sit around waiting for a decision.

Also, think outside of the box when attempting to attract IT candidates. While salary is important, smaller businesses can compete by marketing the opportunity for development and training. Tech talent values a work/life balance, and the flexibility to work remotely if needed. Perhaps offer to pay for a certification of interest to the candidate, as IT professionals also value the opportunity to work on exciting projects and have meanin

gful and purposeful work. Its crucial to focus on where the company is headed, and what future investments in technology are coming. What’s the 3 year plan?

Small businesses must play to their strengths to attract and retain Information Technology candidates. What can you offer that is more valuable than the soaring salaries offered by large organizations? A work/life balance, ongoing training, and true feeling of value to the company may set you apart when recruiting IT talent.

 

Fastest Growing Industries: Who Will Need Help?

October 5th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs the US Economy continues to recover slowly from the economic downturn of 2008, certain industries are booming, and a few you may not think of right away. Consequently, there are industries that can’t find talent fast enough. According to Economic Modeling Specialist International, CareerBuilder’s labor market analysis branch, these industries will be adding thousands of jobs, but are challenged in recruiting the talent to grow at such a pace. What are a few industries that will grow the fastest?

1. Online and Electronic Shopping

It’s no secret that online shopping has changed the way people purchase goods. For those looking for a job, this is the fastest growing industry out there. Companies such as Amazon and eBay have become huge hits with the general public. In such case, expertise in high volume hiring and recruiting is key. Do you have your own talent that specializes in sourcing and recruiting huge numbers of candidates for the retail field?  In the next five years, the industry is projected to add close to 80,000 jobs, a 32% increase.

2. Translator and Interpreter Services

As the workforce continues to diversify, people who speak a second language are at a premium. From businesses to hospitals and everywhere in between, translators are in high demand. This industry will witness job growth close to 30%. At the same time, talent acquisition professionals who speak more than one language can really carve out a niche to partner with businesses to help hire and recruit bi-lingual candidates.

3. Physical, Occupational, and Speech Therapists

Modern medicine continues to advance and is truly a miracle of science. People are getting back to work more quickly, but patients require a large amount of therapy to return to the workforce or even get out of bed. This means plenty of available jobs for those who are licensed in various fields of therapy. This industry will add close to 100,000 jobs in the next five years, representing a 25% increase. The challenge is identifying and retaining these therapists as the industry booms and candidates are more sought after.

Job growth can almost always translate into talent acquisition growth. Businesses and industries with excelling job creation need help recruiting talent. Positioning yourself as an Talent Acquisition expert in a certain industry can put you at an advantage over competition. Do you need need help identifying talent in high-growth industries? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450.

 

 

Do You Really Know Who Would be Best for Your Team?

September 28th, 2016

When there are open positions to fill, you have the chance to add team members who can enhance your current status quo and take your company to the next level.  On the other hand, if you hire the wrong people, you could be facing an epic fail that will be costly on budget, as poor hiring decisions typically result in expensive turnover costs.

flat vector design of employees or executives in meeting. this vector also represents company meetings discussions and opinions employee interaction & engagement

So, how do you combat the potential pitfalls and find people who will be perfect for your team?  Many decision-makers are far removed from the day-to-day tasks of the people under them.  Ironically, these same leaders are often the people tasked with choosing which candidates to hire.  When you take a step back, and look at the bigger picture, this system is set up for failure.  If you want to hire folks who will truly fit well with your existing team, you need to go directly to the source, and seek input from the people who will be working next to the new colleague.  Remove yourself from your role as a leader, and become a learner, the results can be astonishing!

 

Gathering Employee Feedback Boosts Engagement

When you seek assistance from your existing staff, employees will appreciate the fact that you trust them enough to want their feedback.  This simple act shows that you trust your team and want what’s best for them — two key elements to boosting existing employee engagement.  If you don’t want to be stuck filling more positions in the near future, it’s vital to learn how to build and retain employee engagement at every opportunity.

Integrating the Input of Existing Employees

Before you even begin calling candidates into your conference rooms, consult with your team members.  Begin by bringing everyone in as a group.  This will allow people to bounce ideas off each other as suggestions are made.  Make note of the following characteristics:

  • What do they do everyday?
  • What traits make the existing team work well together?
  • What are the downsides to the work they do?  (Although this isn’t a pretty question, the honesty can help open discussion for further improvement in the future, and it can help you identify candidates who can withstand the downfalls in the meantime.)
  • What can your team or company do to improve?

Each of these questions will likely lead to longer discussions from which you can derive plenty of information that you can take back to leadership regarding both the addition of your new team members, as well as changes that should be considered for your existing employees.

Invite Your Employees to the Interviews

Rather than relying on your instinct, bring a team member or two to the interviews.  They will likely think of questions you may not have even considered, and when it’s time to choose the right candidate, you’ll be able to gather a more well-rounded general consensus.

 

What are your thoughts about integrating existing employees into the hiring process?  We’d love to hear your opinions!  Join in the conversation by leaving a comment below, or head over to our Outside-In Facebook page!

How to Attract and Retain STEM Professionals

September 7th, 2016

Illustration of STEM education in apply science concept

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) professionals are in incredibly high demand. Government agencies and research organizations have a variety of definitions for what constitutes a STEM professional, but it generally includes the following career paths for employers in the United States:

  • Science: life sciences such as biology and geoscience, hard sciences like chemistry and physics, and social sciences such as psychology, sociology, and economics
  • Technology: computer and information technology, cyberinfrastructure, nanotechnology, robotics, geographic information systems, software engineering and development
  • Engineering: civil, electrical, aerospace, industrial, and mechanical engineering
  • Mathematics: applied mathematics, statistics, actuarial science

There are several other subfields within STEM that intersect with similar career paths as well, such as biomechanical engineering. When most private sector employers think of STEM they tend to think of high-tech professionals like software developers, engineers, and data scientists since the needs (and average compensation) for the applied sciences and mathematics fields are not homogenous with that of high-tech and engineering.

Each field and subfield has various roles and expectations in the workplace. According to surveys of STEM graduates, higher starting salaries are extremely important to computer science and engineering technology professionals but mathematicians and life scientists value diverse workplaces with strong camaraderie, rather than going for the organization offering the highest paycheck.

Other integral findings for what STEM professionals are looking for in the workplace include the following:

  • Benefits that are meaningful. Benefit packages actually outrank starting salary in terms of what STEM professionals look at when they compare potential employers. Are you offering a competitive amount of flex time, sick days, maternity and paternity leave, transit benefits, medical benefits, and other perks that are important for attracting and retaining high-value employees?
  • Opportunities for personal growth and advancement. Regardless of where the professional falls on the STEM spectrum, all are seeking opportunities for personal growth like working on projects that are important to them, being challenged, and having a supportive work environment conducive to this kind of growth. If your projects can give also give him or her a chance to improve their communities, they highly value that opportunity more than enviable starting salaries.
  • Job security. Job hopping is the new normal in many fields today and most people want job security. However, STEM professionals highly covet job security over other factors in their work environment when selecting an employer. If you recruit primarily on a project basis or have high turnover rates, your organization will have a hard time attracting quality STEM candidates.
  • Inclusive and supportive company culture. STEM professionals greatly desire diversity and recognition for doing a great job over a casual atmosphere that offers craft beer on tap and ping pong tables. Make sure that your website and promotional materials demonstrate great company culture.
  • Assignments are clearly-defined. STEM professionals want to work in organizations where they don’t have to sift through middle management and oblique mission statements to figure out what they’re working on. If your company is known for getting down to brass to business, be sure to market your business in that way.

 

The Many Names of a Talent Acquisition Professional

June 8th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs we discussed last week in What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?, the world of talent acquisition continues to evolve and with it, so do the roles of recruiting professionals. While the titles themselves don’t really matter, it’s important to clearly define roles within your internal recruiting department. Who does what? When & how often? How do you communicate and coordinate as a team? When building a talent acquisition team, clear allocations of roles & responsibilities is crucial.

But back to the many job titles of a recruitment professional — to prove to you just how many options there are we brainstormed as many names as we could, not including level and geography denotations like “junior” or “regional.” You can also add many more dimensions by adding specific functional recruiting like “technical/IT” or “marketing” and industries like “life sciences” or “healthcare” to define the types of roles and sectors the recruiting professional works with. We excluded words & phrases like “contract” “part time” or “remote”, which do play large part in talent strategy but add too many possibilities to the list. Finally, you can also get pay homage to your culture with creative adjectives like “Off-centered Recruiter” or “Rockstar Recruiter” so we left those out too.

By the end of it, we came up with 154 titles for talent acquisition professionals. Are we missing any? As social media and drip marketing evolves, we are on the look out for new roles & titles that specialize in new sourcing channels in candidate communications/engagement. Comment below if you have a title to add!

  1. Campus Recruiter
  2. Campus Recruitment Manager
  3. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  4. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  5. Chief People Officer
  6. Chief Talent Officer
  7. College Recruiter
  8. Contingent Workforce Manager
  9. Contract Recruiter
  10. Corporate Recruiter
  11. Corporate Recruitment Lead
  12. Deputy Head of Recruitment
  13. Direct Recruiter
  14. Direct Recruitment Specialist
  15. Director – Executive Recruitment
  16. Director – Strategic Resourcing
  17. Executive Recruiter
  18. Executive Recruiting Leader
  19. Executive Recruitment Manager
  20. Executive Search Lead
  21. Executive Talent Acquisition
  22. Executive Talent Sourcing Manager
  23. Experienced Hire Recruiter
  24. Experienced Hire Recruitment Manager
  25. External Candidate Developer
  26. Global Graduate Resourcing Manager
  27. Global Program Manager – Employer Branding
  28. Global Talent Selection Manager
  29. Graduate Recruiter
  30. Graduate Recruitment Advisor
  31. Graduate Recruitment Manager
  32. Head of Campus Recruitment
  33. Head of Client Services (RPO)
  34. Head of Graduate Recruitment
  35. Head of Graduates, Apprentices, & Resourcing
  36. Head of In-house Executive Search
  37. Head of Projects – Talent Acquisition
  38. Head of Recruitment
  39. Head of Recruitment Operations
  40. Head of Recruitment Projects
  41. Head of Recruitment Strategy
  42. Head of Resourcing
  43. Head of RPO Projects
  44. Head of Senior Hires Recruitment
  45. Head of Student Recruitment
  46. Head of Talent Acquisition
  47. Headhunter
  48. HR Manager – Recruitment
  49. HR Manager – Resourcing
  50. HR Staffing Specialist
  51. Hybrid Recruiter
  52. In-house Recruiter
  53. Inhouse Recruitment Consultant
  54. Internal Recruiter
  55. Internal Recruiter – Interns & Apprenticeships
  56. Internal Recruitment Manager
  57. Internal Talent Acquisition Manager
  58. Internet Recruiter
  59. Lateral Recruiter
  60. Lateral Recruitment Manager
  61. Lead Recruiter
  62. Lead Sourcing Consultant
  63. Lead Talent Scout
  64. Leadership Recruiter
  65. Manager – Executive Search
  66. Manager – Talent Systems & Resourcing
  67. MBA Recruiter
  68. MBA Recruitment Manager
  69. Onsite Account Director/RPO Account Director
  70. Onsite Account Manager/RPO Account Manager
  71. People Manager
  72. Principal Delivery Consultant
  73. Principal Recruitment Specialist
  74. Recruiter
  75. Recruiter / Sourcer
  76. Recruiting Coordinator
  77. Recruiting Researcher
  78. Recruitment & Engagement Manager
  79. Recruitment Account Manager
  80. Recruitment Advisor
  81. Recruitment Business Partner
  82. Recruitment Consultant
  83. Recruitment Director
  84. Recruitment Executive
  85. Recruitment Lead
  86. Recruitment Manager
  87. Recruitment Marketing Manager
  88. Recruitment Officer
  89. Recruitment Operations Manager
  90. Recruitment Partner
  91. Recruitment Program Manager
  92. Recruitment Representative
  93. Recruitment Specialist
  94. Recruitment Strategy & Planning Manager
  95. Recruitment Team Lead
  96. Recruitment Team Leader
  97. Researcher
  98. Resource Consultant
  99. Resource Partner
  100. Resourcer
  101. Resourcing & Recruitment Manager
  102. Resourcing Advisor
  103. Resourcing Associate
  104. Resourcing Business Partner
  105. Resourcing Director
  106. Resourcing Lead
  107. Resourcing Manager
  108. Resourcing Partner
  109. Resourcing Program Lead
  110. Resourcing Relationship Manager
  111. Resourcing Specialist
  112. RPO Lead
  113. Senior Recruiter
  114. Service Delivery Manager
  115. Sourcer
  116. Sourcing Advisor
  117. Sourcing Director
  118. Sourcing Manager
  119. Sourcing Specialist
  120. Sourcing Team Leader
  121. Staffing Channels Intelligence Researcher
  122. Staffing Consultant
  123. Staffing Manager
  124. Staffing Specialist
  125. Strategic Recruitment Lead
  126. Strategic Sourcing Recruiter
  127. Supplier Relationship Manager
  128. Talent Acquisition Administrator
  129. Talent Acquisition Advisor
  130. Talent Acquisition Associate
  131. Talent Acquisition Business Partner
  132. Talent Acquisition Consultant
  133. Talent Acquisition Coordinator
  134. Talent Acquisition Director
  135. Talent Acquisition Lead
  136. Talent Acquisition Leader
  137. Talent Acquisition Manager
  138. Talent Acquisition Operations Manager
  139. Talent Acquisition Partner/Business Partner – Talent Acquisition
  140. Talent Acquisition Program Manager
  141. Talent Acquisition Recruiter
  142. Talent Attraction Consultant
  143. Talent Attraction Specialist
  144. Talent Consultant – Executive Search
  145. Talent Data & Research Specialist
  146. Talent Engagement Advisor
  147. Talent Identification Manager
  148. Talent Magnet
  149. Talent Partner
  150. Talent Recruiter
  151. Talent Scout
  152. Talent Search Manager
  153. Talent Sourcer
  154. Talent Sourcing Lead
  155. Talent Sourcing Lead
  156. Talent Sourcing Manager
  157. Talent Sourcing Partner
  158. Talent Sourcing Specialst
  159. Talent Specialist
  160. University Relations Recruiter
  161. University Staffing Consultant
  162. Vendor Management Specialist -Talent Acquisition
  163. Vendor Manager – Recruitment

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