Posts Tagged: recruitment


Do You Really Know Who Would be Best for Your Team?

September 28th, 2016

When there are open positions to fill, you have the chance to add team members who can enhance your current status quo and take your company to the next level.  On the other hand, if you hire the wrong people, you could be facing an epic fail that will be costly on budget, as poor hiring decisions typically result in expensive turnover costs.

flat vector design of employees or executives in meeting. this vector also represents company meetings discussions and opinions employee interaction & engagement

So, how do you combat the potential pitfalls and find people who will be perfect for your team?  Many decision-makers are far removed from the day-to-day tasks of the people under them.  Ironically, these same leaders are often the people tasked with choosing which candidates to hire.  When you take a step back, and look at the bigger picture, this system is set up for failure.  If you want to hire folks who will truly fit well with your existing team, you need to go directly to the source, and seek input from the people who will be working next to the new colleague.  Remove yourself from your role as a leader, and become a learner, the results can be astonishing!

 

Gathering Employee Feedback Boosts Engagement

When you seek assistance from your existing staff, employees will appreciate the fact that you trust them enough to want their feedback.  This simple act shows that you trust your team and want what’s best for them — two key elements to boosting existing employee engagement.  If you don’t want to be stuck filling more positions in the near future, it’s vital to learn how to build and retain employee engagement at every opportunity.

Integrating the Input of Existing Employees

Before you even begin calling candidates into your conference rooms, consult with your team members.  Begin by bringing everyone in as a group.  This will allow people to bounce ideas off each other as suggestions are made.  Make note of the following characteristics:

  • What do they do everyday?
  • What traits make the existing team work well together?
  • What are the downsides to the work they do?  (Although this isn’t a pretty question, the honesty can help open discussion for further improvement in the future, and it can help you identify candidates who can withstand the downfalls in the meantime.)
  • What can your team or company do to improve?

Each of these questions will likely lead to longer discussions from which you can derive plenty of information that you can take back to leadership regarding both the addition of your new team members, as well as changes that should be considered for your existing employees.

Invite Your Employees to the Interviews

Rather than relying on your instinct, bring a team member or two to the interviews.  They will likely think of questions you may not have even considered, and when it’s time to choose the right candidate, you’ll be able to gather a more well-rounded general consensus.

 

What are your thoughts about integrating existing employees into the hiring process?  We’d love to hear your opinions!  Join in the conversation by leaving a comment below, or head over to our Outside-In Facebook page!

How to Attract and Retain STEM Professionals

September 7th, 2016

Illustration of STEM education in apply science concept

STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) professionals are in incredibly high demand. Government agencies and research organizations have a variety of definitions for what constitutes a STEM professional, but it generally includes the following career paths for employers in the United States:

  • Science: life sciences such as biology and geoscience, hard sciences like chemistry and physics, and social sciences such as psychology, sociology, and economics
  • Technology: computer and information technology, cyberinfrastructure, nanotechnology, robotics, geographic information systems, software engineering and development
  • Engineering: civil, electrical, aerospace, industrial, and mechanical engineering
  • Mathematics: applied mathematics, statistics, actuarial science

There are several other subfields within STEM that intersect with similar career paths as well, such as biomechanical engineering. When most private sector employers think of STEM they tend to think of high-tech professionals like software developers, engineers, and data scientists since the needs (and average compensation) for the applied sciences and mathematics fields are not homogenous with that of high-tech and engineering.

Each field and subfield has various roles and expectations in the workplace. According to surveys of STEM graduates, higher starting salaries are extremely important to computer science and engineering technology professionals but mathematicians and life scientists value diverse workplaces with strong camaraderie, rather than going for the organization offering the highest paycheck.

Other integral findings for what STEM professionals are looking for in the workplace include the following:

  • Benefits that are meaningful. Benefit packages actually outrank starting salary in terms of what STEM professionals look at when they compare potential employers. Are you offering a competitive amount of flex time, sick days, maternity and paternity leave, transit benefits, medical benefits, and other perks that are important for attracting and retaining high-value employees?
  • Opportunities for personal growth and advancement. Regardless of where the professional falls on the STEM spectrum, all are seeking opportunities for personal growth like working on projects that are important to them, being challenged, and having a supportive work environment conducive to this kind of growth. If your projects can give also give him or her a chance to improve their communities, they highly value that opportunity more than enviable starting salaries.
  • Job security. Job hopping is the new normal in many fields today and most people want job security. However, STEM professionals highly covet job security over other factors in their work environment when selecting an employer. If you recruit primarily on a project basis or have high turnover rates, your organization will have a hard time attracting quality STEM candidates.
  • Inclusive and supportive company culture. STEM professionals greatly desire diversity and recognition for doing a great job over a casual atmosphere that offers craft beer on tap and ping pong tables. Make sure that your website and promotional materials demonstrate great company culture.
  • Assignments are clearly-defined. STEM professionals want to work in organizations where they don’t have to sift through middle management and oblique mission statements to figure out what they’re working on. If your company is known for getting down to brass to business, be sure to market your business in that way.

 

The Many Names of a Talent Acquisition Professional

June 8th, 2016

titles-for-talent-acquisition-professionalAs we discussed last week in What is the Job of a Talent Sourcer?, the world of talent acquisition continues to evolve and with it, so do the roles of recruiting professionals. While the titles themselves don’t really matter, it’s important to clearly define roles within your internal recruiting department. Who does what? When & how often? How do you communicate and coordinate as a team? When building a talent acquisition team, clear allocations of roles & responsibilities is crucial.

But back to the many job titles of a recruitment professional — to prove to you just how many options there are we brainstormed as many names as we could, not including level and geography denotations like “junior” or “regional.” You can also add many more dimensions by adding specific functional recruiting like “technical/IT” or “marketing” and industries like “life sciences” or “healthcare” to define the types of roles and sectors the recruiting professional works with. We excluded words & phrases like “contract” “part time” or “remote”, which do play large part in talent strategy but add too many possibilities to the list. Finally, you can also get pay homage to your culture with creative adjectives like “Off-centered Recruiter” or “Rockstar Recruiter” so we left those out too.

By the end of it, we came up with 154 titles for talent acquisition professionals. Are we missing any? As social media and drip marketing evolves, we are on the look out for new roles & titles that specialize in new sourcing channels in candidate communications/engagement. Comment below if you have a title to add!

  1. Campus Recruiter
  2. Campus Recruitment Manager
  3. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  4. Candidate Attraction Specialist
  5. Chief People Officer
  6. Chief Talent Officer
  7. College Recruiter
  8. Contingent Workforce Manager
  9. Contract Recruiter
  10. Corporate Recruiter
  11. Corporate Recruitment Lead
  12. Deputy Head of Recruitment
  13. Direct Recruiter
  14. Direct Recruitment Specialist
  15. Director – Executive Recruitment
  16. Director – Strategic Resourcing
  17. Executive Recruiter
  18. Executive Recruiting Leader
  19. Executive Recruitment Manager
  20. Executive Search Lead
  21. Executive Talent Acquisition
  22. Executive Talent Sourcing Manager
  23. Experienced Hire Recruiter
  24. Experienced Hire Recruitment Manager
  25. External Candidate Developer
  26. Global Graduate Resourcing Manager
  27. Global Program Manager – Employer Branding
  28. Global Talent Selection Manager
  29. Graduate Recruiter
  30. Graduate Recruitment Advisor
  31. Graduate Recruitment Manager
  32. Head of Campus Recruitment
  33. Head of Client Services (RPO)
  34. Head of Graduate Recruitment
  35. Head of Graduates, Apprentices, & Resourcing
  36. Head of In-house Executive Search
  37. Head of Projects – Talent Acquisition
  38. Head of Recruitment
  39. Head of Recruitment Operations
  40. Head of Recruitment Projects
  41. Head of Recruitment Strategy
  42. Head of Resourcing
  43. Head of RPO Projects
  44. Head of Senior Hires Recruitment
  45. Head of Student Recruitment
  46. Head of Talent Acquisition
  47. Headhunter
  48. HR Manager – Recruitment
  49. HR Manager – Resourcing
  50. HR Staffing Specialist
  51. Hybrid Recruiter
  52. In-house Recruiter
  53. Inhouse Recruitment Consultant
  54. Internal Recruiter
  55. Internal Recruiter – Interns & Apprenticeships
  56. Internal Recruitment Manager
  57. Internal Talent Acquisition Manager
  58. Internet Recruiter
  59. Lateral Recruiter
  60. Lateral Recruitment Manager
  61. Lead Recruiter
  62. Lead Sourcing Consultant
  63. Lead Talent Scout
  64. Leadership Recruiter
  65. Manager – Executive Search
  66. Manager – Talent Systems & Resourcing
  67. MBA Recruiter
  68. MBA Recruitment Manager
  69. Onsite Account Director/RPO Account Director
  70. Onsite Account Manager/RPO Account Manager
  71. People Manager
  72. Principal Delivery Consultant
  73. Principal Recruitment Specialist
  74. Recruiter
  75. Recruiter / Sourcer
  76. Recruiting Coordinator
  77. Recruiting Researcher
  78. Recruitment & Engagement Manager
  79. Recruitment Account Manager
  80. Recruitment Advisor
  81. Recruitment Business Partner
  82. Recruitment Consultant
  83. Recruitment Director
  84. Recruitment Executive
  85. Recruitment Lead
  86. Recruitment Manager
  87. Recruitment Marketing Manager
  88. Recruitment Officer
  89. Recruitment Operations Manager
  90. Recruitment Partner
  91. Recruitment Program Manager
  92. Recruitment Representative
  93. Recruitment Specialist
  94. Recruitment Strategy & Planning Manager
  95. Recruitment Team Lead
  96. Recruitment Team Leader
  97. Researcher
  98. Resource Consultant
  99. Resource Partner
  100. Resourcer
  101. Resourcing & Recruitment Manager
  102. Resourcing Advisor
  103. Resourcing Associate
  104. Resourcing Business Partner
  105. Resourcing Director
  106. Resourcing Lead
  107. Resourcing Manager
  108. Resourcing Partner
  109. Resourcing Program Lead
  110. Resourcing Relationship Manager
  111. Resourcing Specialist
  112. RPO Lead
  113. Senior Recruiter
  114. Service Delivery Manager
  115. Sourcer
  116. Sourcing Advisor
  117. Sourcing Director
  118. Sourcing Manager
  119. Sourcing Specialist
  120. Sourcing Team Leader
  121. Staffing Channels Intelligence Researcher
  122. Staffing Consultant
  123. Staffing Manager
  124. Staffing Specialist
  125. Strategic Recruitment Lead
  126. Strategic Sourcing Recruiter
  127. Supplier Relationship Manager
  128. Talent Acquisition Administrator
  129. Talent Acquisition Advisor
  130. Talent Acquisition Associate
  131. Talent Acquisition Business Partner
  132. Talent Acquisition Consultant
  133. Talent Acquisition Coordinator
  134. Talent Acquisition Director
  135. Talent Acquisition Lead
  136. Talent Acquisition Leader
  137. Talent Acquisition Manager
  138. Talent Acquisition Operations Manager
  139. Talent Acquisition Partner/Business Partner – Talent Acquisition
  140. Talent Acquisition Program Manager
  141. Talent Acquisition Recruiter
  142. Talent Attraction Consultant
  143. Talent Attraction Specialist
  144. Talent Consultant – Executive Search
  145. Talent Data & Research Specialist
  146. Talent Engagement Advisor
  147. Talent Identification Manager
  148. Talent Magnet
  149. Talent Partner
  150. Talent Recruiter
  151. Talent Scout
  152. Talent Search Manager
  153. Talent Sourcer
  154. Talent Sourcing Lead
  155. Talent Sourcing Lead
  156. Talent Sourcing Manager
  157. Talent Sourcing Partner
  158. Talent Sourcing Specialst
  159. Talent Specialist
  160. University Relations Recruiter
  161. University Staffing Consultant
  162. Vendor Management Specialist -Talent Acquisition
  163. Vendor Manager – Recruitment

Need help structuring your talent acquisition department?

Recruitment-Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

CBI Way: Teeing up a Successful Partnership

April 30th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Alex Patton

With continual encouraging data regarding labor and employment, the mindset of employers may be leaning optimistically toward more hiring. Of course, there is bound to still be apprehension when considering the hiring of more talent, or the partnering with an RPO provider. However, there are few simple steps to guarantee success before completely engaging in a partnership.

Untitled-7A partnership can be defined as an association of two or more parties, and when talking RPO, it usually includes many more people. To best guarantee success prior to implementation, determining all peoples involved is essential. As a customer, knowing all the moving parts of the service you are purchasing leaves nothing to the imagination, very comforting for a business that may be engaging in their first RPO initiative. As the partner, it’s important to be aware of who might be your source of feedback, points of contacts, and who could possibly be helpful if another person involved is out of the office. Knowing who is involved helps keep an RPO engagement sound, smooth, and clear.

Part of ensuring an effective and fluid RPO integration is the defining of Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for the duration of the engagement. Usually worked into the Service Level Agreement, which we discussed in a previous CBI Way blog, these indicators may not necessarily be binding, but more of a longer term measure of success on a weekly or monthly basis and reported back to the client.  A great example of a KPI would be the candidate to interview ratio. In other words, how many submitted candidates turn into an interview with the client. By measuring non-binding indicators there is opportunity to manage and improve throughout the engagement.

Of course, there are more tools and steps to ensure success before implementation and contract signing, whether small-scale projects or full enterprise RPO. But by determining a focus on what is most important to you as the client and laying out the working parts (people) of the upcoming partnership, a high performance engagement is imminent.

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices. 

CBI Way: 5 Ways to Go Back to the Future of Sourcing

February 18th, 2014

Guest blog spot by Outside-In® Team Member Caitlin Olszewskibacktofuture

Grab those Nike power laces and your hoverboard, this blog’s about to go 88mph back to the future of sourcing. There’s no hiding from it—we live in a society where today’s technologies are tomorrow’s artifacts. We are spoiled by technology that is meant to make our lives easier but inherently makes us disconnected from interpersonal communication. Gone are the days of needles in the haystack, purple squirrels, and cold calls. The future of sourcing is all about genuine relationships, honest networking, and full engagement. Here are some tips and tricks to become a more proactive and efficient sourcer in a world that is rapidly changing. (Spoiler alert, Marty McFly: They might not be what you think!)

  • Be Engaged: Engagement is the word of the year, and I’m not talkin’ carats. (Although, if my future husband is reading this, here’s a hint: 1 carat princess cut pave.) Back to the topic. There are countless articles teaching readers how to be more engaged in both their work and personal lives. I’ve even read The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal to learn more about this popular topic only to find that I was certainly not as engaged as I had thought. Think about investing your energy rather than your time. After all, your time is worthless if you’re not giving it your full attention. So drink that Vitamin C, get off your smartphone, and devote your full attention to your candidate!
  • Know Your Brand. Be Your Brand: Are you considered an “All-Star Recruiter” via LinkedIn? So is the guy to your left. And the one to the right. In a world where a million recruiters are flooding the inboxes of candidates with stereotypical messages, how do you stand out? What’s your Unique Selling Proposition? Remember that you’re representing your company and that you’re an extension of its brand, an embodiment if you will. This one probably sounds like a given, but too many recruiters come across as phony or robotic and it’s important to distance yourself from that stigma and be authentic and genuine. Seriously. Take mom’s advice and just be yourself.
  • Value Quality > Quantity: Anyone can tell you that it’s in your long-term interest to reach out to 10 dream candidates rather than 100 so-so’s whose resumes contain one measly keyword of your search. However, many recruiters find themselves disregarding this practice simply because it’s easier and they want to yield high numbers. Use your time wisely and harbor sincere interactions with stellar candidates. You’ll be thanking yourself when the next job order comes in and you already have an A+ pool to choose from.
  • Build Relationships: How many quality candidates have you sourced today? Big deal. This week? Zzz. Can you list their names? All of them? Probably not. Make your candidates feel valuable—don’t treat them like another billable to fill a position. Think about how you would want to be treated. You should be having consistent, responsive interactions with candidates that help you climb that relational ladder. Be open and transparent throughout the process—take the time to get to know each candidate and their personality. This will help you tremendously in finding the right fit for both your candidate and client. Also, be sure to follow up with each candidate!
  • Keep Up with Technology (1.21 Gigawatts!): While in the beginning I mentioned being spoiled by technology, I didn’t mean throw it away altogether! Find your perfect balance of using today’s best sources to build genuine relationships. The technology world as we know it is changing rapidly—how will you adapt? As we have learned from the dinosaurs, you either evolve or you are reduced to only being a three year old’s birthday party theme. It doesn’t take a DeLorean to stay current with sourcing strategies, technologies, and best practices. All you have to do is stay active by consistent training and searching for invaluable information. Spend a little bit of time each with with a cup of coffee and a couple sourcing blogs & articles. Trust me, a little goes a long way. Find something good? Be sure to share it with your team! You’ll actually be saving time in the long run AND you’ll be well ahead of the game.

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices. 

CBI Way: 5 Strategic Reasons to Use a Contract Recruiter

December 4th, 2013

A Contract Recruiter is not a new concept. Companies work with contract recruiters for many tactical reasons. Extended leave, summer vacation and maternity leave are all tactical reasons to hire a contract recruiter for a short period of time. But there are also many strategic reasons to use a Recruiter On-Demand service model. At CBI Group, we help customers view their talent acquisition departments and hiring plans strategically. Here are five ways customers use contract recruiters strategically.

  1. Product Launch: If your company is launching a new product or service, you may need the assistance of a contract recruiter to augment your existing recruiting team. Likely you’ll need to bring on the right technical skill sets to build your product or service, and once the new product is ready, you will need a sales force expansion program.
  2. Opening New Location: Is your company growing and expanding to new locations? If you are opening up a new location, businessmen-152572_640whether it’s in the same city or town, or somewhere else in North America – you’ll have an increase in requisitions until you fill the jobs for that location. This is a great opportunity to bring on a contract recruiter for your specific hiring goals.
  3. Hiring Peaks, Rapid Growth: Some companies don’t need a new product or location to experience rapid growth. All businesses experience ups and downs in hiring and a contract recruiter is a flexible option that is the best way to smooth out the peaks and valleys of workforce demand.
  4. Hiring for a Specific Business Unit: Many times, corporate HR teams feel confident in their recruiting ability for the most part, but sometimes struggle with hiring for a specific business unit. Companies can bring on a contract recruiter with specialty or niche experience to recruit just for that unit, and still keep the rest of the TA internal. Whether IT recruiting, Sales hiring, or Finance is your sore spot, contract recruiters provide you with expertise and results while keeping headcount and budget in line.
  5. An Acquisition or Divestiture: Organizing, merging, and restructuring HR departments can be confusing and difficult during an acquisition or divestiture. CBI Group contract recruiters can handle the HR side of things for a short-term or long-term period of change.

Connect with CBI Group to learn more about our Recruiter On-Demand service.

Building Blocks of RPO Solutions – Post-Implementation Success

November 19th, 2013

Over the course of a couple months, our RPO blog series has taken us from detailing benefits and types of Recruitment Process Outsourcing solutions, through best practices for full implementation. In between, we discussed the “building blocks” of a solution; including, identifying the business challenge, developing a specific project solution, and establishing a Service Level Agreement (SLA). Once implemented, the RPO engagement may be primed for success, but working to ensure sustainability and maintain progress through the partnership is imperative.

As discussed in CBI Way: Building Blocks of RPO Solutions, the SLA is vital for maintaining and improving efficiency and quality.  The SLA defines the performance measurements, services, expectations, and guarantees for which each partner is accountable when engaging in a recruitment process outsourcing project.  As a reminder, additional details for a project’s SLA include:  key metrics, communication plan, and roles outlined with responsibilities. Specifically, reporting can undoubtedly help determine how the process is progressing and where there is room for improvement. Another benefit of staying true to the SLA’s reporting of key metrics is having the ability to gain, as well as provide, strategic insight into the current recruiting process.

human-65931_640For example, a report by the vendor detailing how many candidates were sourced, screened, submitted, and interviewed, can be utilized to analyze time-to-fill and quality of sourced candidates. Showing an area of the process where the numbers are low with perhaps a less than favorable ratio of sourced candidates to interviewed candidates would be very valuable. A poor ratio would detail a needed improvement in quality of the candidates initially sourced, possibly revisiting the sourcing strategy. As part of that improvement, routine meetings with hiring managers must continue to be an integral part of preserving a successful engagement. Communication is fundamental to keep both parties informed and accountable as the project continues to move along.

An RPO relationship that is properly managed and maintained after implementation delivers a customized component to the recruiting process that can be invaluable. Continued communication, reporting, tracking, and anything detailed in a properly planned SLA can also help educate both parties, further increasing the chances of a smooth, productive, and beneficial RPO partnership. With a clearly outlined business challenge, detailed project plan, well-planned Service Level Agreement, and continuous improvement after implementation, there is a much higher probability of a successful RPO engagement.

9/11 and the Resilience of the American Worker

September 11th, 2013

911Guest blog spot by Kelly Murray, Marketing Coordinator

Twelve years ago, our country sustained a tragedy so shocking that it rattled each American citizen to their core. We will always remember where we were the morning of 9/11, and the horror we witnessed as two landmarks of international commerce fell at the hands of terrorists. Thousands of lives were claimed that day but in turn, millions of Americans were united under the strength of our nation and a vow to Never Forget those lost.

As the years go on, 9/11 etches its place into American history and its symbolism grows. I was only thirteen when the World Trade Center fell, and at the time I struggled to comprehend what this blow meant to our country on an international scale. I understood the degree of death and destruction that had occurred and felt the confusion, fear, and grief that any little girl would at the time. Years later, now a young working professional, when I look back on 9/11, I am struck by the resilience our nation had to have in order to pick up the pieces and move forward – not only emotionally, but as a political and economic entity.

When hit with unexpected hardship, whether emotional or professional, it’s difficult to maintain focus on the job and push forward. Of course, the events of 9/11 exceeded any difficulty one could have expected to endure. However, I think its important to note that as Americans, both our humanity and work ethic were tested on 9/11. The al-Qaeda chose to destroy a symbol of international trade and commerce (as well as a symbol of defense and national security, the Pentagon) that day. The burden of strength in the eyes of adversity fell on our political leaders, but also on the American worker: corporate executives, entrepreneurs, young professionals, entertainers, laborers – no profession or discipline was spared. We had to dig deep and continue working to carry each other through.

As an entrepreneur, CBI Group’s president felt this burden especially hard that day, when his company opened its doors for the first time on the morning of September 11th. And yet, he and his employees, like many, had to press on and focus on creating business, even if it felt ‘wrong’ or ‘inappropriate’ to do so during a time of such great loss. Each year at CBI Group, this day is met with a bittersweet sentiment: as a celebration of another year in business met with a solemn reminder of a national tragedy. Over a decade later, we continue to operate successfully and help businesses fill jobs, recruit employees, and develop their workforce – a reflection of the resilience of an entrepreneur and his country.

So, this article is simply a testament to the American worker, for rising up and pushing forward in times of turmoil. Since 9/11, our nation has struggled economically and suffered the impact of war, but we have pressed on. In the American spirit, our country has rebuilt (quite literally, the National September 11th Museum and Memorial opened in 2011) and reclaimed our place as an economic force.

To all those lost and affected by the tragedy of 9/11, we honor and remember you. As citizens, we will never forget what happened that day and the toll it took on our country. As workers, we will continue to push forward and keep the American Dream alive…a notion that drives the belief that in America anything is possible and anyone can find success – if they work hard enough for it.

CBI Way: 5 Hidden Responsibilities of a Recruiter

July 25th, 2013

Guest blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, Recruiter On-Demand and Managed Staffing Practice Leader

Job Description

You want to be a recruiter when you grow up? Really? Sounds great! You will play matchmaker getting great people the job of their dreams! You will help companies identify the talent they need to launch their next product, make their sales numbers, lead their operation, and manage their corporate accounting and risk! You will use behavioral and psychological techniques to crawl inside the minds of your recruits and get the perfect cultural fit for the teams you support!

Yes, you will do all of this – and it’s often why so many of us choose a career in Talent Acquisition, but below are a few items that never seem to show up on the recruiter’s job description that are just as much a reality in today’s world:

1. You will be a vendor/partner manager. Yes, you are the best at what you do, but you need technology and helping hands to do it. You will handle agreements with job boards, ATS providers, contingent workforce/staffing firms, and the occasional search recruiter who happens to be the COO’s nephew. Make sure you sharpen your negotiating skills!

2. You will have to talk to candidates’ moms and spouses! Yes, it has happened. Be ready for the call from Mom asking why little Betty did not get the job and that what showed up on her background check happened two years ago…  The recruiting, and certainly the relocation process, is a family affair.

3. You will have to know when to say no… So your client says, “This job is impossible to fill. It has been open for 18 months.” If you are a corporate recruiter do you spend your own, and additionally, your candidates’ time for the next year and a half trying to fill that impossible job? If you are an agent/search recruiter do you take their money and not deliver? This is a classic No – in this situation, it’s time to work with your client to review the requirements and/or have the discussion that this is not really an open requisition.

4. You will become a wardrobe expert. Ever watch What Not to Wear? If you do, take a note from Stacy and Clinton because you too must be able to tell your candidate how to dress, and which piercings, earrings, nose rings, and even tongue rings to not wear to the second round of interviews.

5. You will learn to expect the unexpected. We live in a world of products and services, and as a recruiter your products and services are your candidates. In this role, you will quickly realize how unpredictable people can be with their diverse opinions, habits and preferences – you’ll catch on to expect the unexpected!

The CBI Way blog series explores the tools and practices used in Talent Acquisition. CBI Way is CBI Group’s recruiting approach and methodology – it’s how we do what we do! Check in with CBI Way for insights around workforce education and training, the latest trends in recruiting technology, and how to best utilize these tools towards improving your own recruiting practices.

CBI Group Recruiter Sees Networking as Path to Your Next ‘Great Adventure’

May 10th, 2013

One of the most influential ways to approach a job search is through networking.  But how and why invest your time in networking?

“In 2012, networking accounted for more than one in four hires at major companies, the most of any strategy used in job hunting,” says David Vander Does, President of the National Search Advisory and a Recruitment Consultant with Gore Medical Products and CBI Group.  “And if a candidate has a referral from inside a company, he/she is 70 times more likely to be hired than a candidate without this connection,” Dave adds, referring to a finding published by Career Xroads.

So how do you network?  Where do you start and what are the tools to help you?

“Networking is all about relationship-building.  It’s who you know and who they know that can really make the difference in your search” Dave says.

The first step is to make a list of current and prospective contacts.  “Think about the relationships that you already have (family, friends, previous co-workers, etc…) and add them to your list.  Then do your research and identify others that you need to know (company contacts, business leaders, others in your profession) and add them to your list.   Think beyond the obvious, be strategic,” Dave advises.

There are lots of tools to use in building your network with www.LinkedIn.com as one of the best places to start.  “If you don’t already have a LinkedIn presence, establish one,” Dave says.  “This serves as your professional profile for recruiters, hiring managers and all the current and potential people in your network.  Think of it this way: if you don’t have a presence on LinkedIn, you don’t exist.”

Once you’re on LinkedIn, you can conduct searches by company name, industry, through current and former co-workers and through your network of LinkedIn contacts that you should be continuously growing.  Similarly, using search engines like Google can provide great insight into your field, and help you identify prospective companies and professional associations.

Dave says your next step is to divide your list of contacts into three groups: warm (people who know who you are and can give you a good reference), casual (people you may need to reconnect with) and cold contacts (people you haven’t met yet, but you need to meet). “This will help you prioritize and maximize your efforts as you begin to work your network”

Develop a database or a spreadsheet with of course names, titles, e-mail addresses, etc. but then leave a column for “Notes” where you can track of your progress with each networking target.

Now you’re ready to get out there and network. Dave says to practice these four steps with each person you meet:

1.  Make them aware that you are looking for your next “adventure”

2.  Guide their thinking about what that “adventure” could be

3.  Be confident and specific

4.  Give them permission to share your name or resume as they see fit

Dave also encourages job hunters and net-workers to develop a script and practice in your home or office.  “For most, networking can be overwhelming and frightening.  But remember, it’s really nothing more then the act of building relationships one contact at a time.  The more you do it; the easier it becomes.”  Keep these elements in mind:

1.  Intro- who am I and why am I calling or e-mailing?

2.  Your mission- I’m pursuing my next best adventure and thought you could help…

3.  Give them permission to say “no.”

4.  Provide something of value in return.

5.  The sensational close- share your plans for follow-up and ask if you can keep in touch.

“Most people will encourage you to stay in touch… do-so, you’d be surprised at how many people never get in touch with these prospects again,” Dave says.

When reaching out to a networking prospect you haven’t met, start with an e-mail introducing yourself and making a connection (Our mutual friend Sam Jones suggested I contact you; we attended xx college at the same time, I’m also a member of your professional association…). Then state your purpose and tell them when you’ll follow-up.  Then when you call, say “I’m following up on the e-mail I sent you on…this process helps to eliminate the “cold call””

Remember to say thank you. “People in jobs today are busier than ever and even if they only give you five minutes, it’s important that you acknowledge their time,” Dave points out.  “And if they help you make a good connection, let them know how grateful you are.”

And remember; always try to provide value in return.“Good relationships are not one sided; do what you can to help others in your network in return for the help they provided to you. It makes all the difference and will help to strengthen your network for the future.”

Outside-In® Book List

Review-Us-Blog-02
© Year CBI Group. All Rights Reserved. Site Credits.