Posts Tagged: retention


How to Write Job Descriptions That Will Identify the Right Candidate

December 28th, 2016

When responsible for managing staff, one of the most important tasks is hiring new employees or contract talent. Choosing the wrong person can have negative consequences. In turn, if your job description does not accurately describe the job requirements, you may not attract the right person for the job, or high quality talent. So what is important in a job description for today’s best candidates?

Convey Your Company’s Culture

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Company culture is very important when it comes to interviewing and recruiting a potential employee. Your want to attract candidates that will be a good fit for the company and will enjoy coming to the office every day. You may think that you have found the perfect candidate based on their education, experience and skills, yet, if this person is not a culture fit, he or she may not be productive or perform to their full potential. Communicate the corporate mission, work-life balance and other important aspects of the company culture in your job description. If you offer remote work opportunities, flexible schedules or an on-site gym, include each on the job description, it can make a difference between competing opportunities.

Make it Interesting

Candidates spend significant time looking at job descriptions and hopefully tailoring their resume to that description. Many candidates will simply move on to the next employment listing if they are reading a boring job description. Make your job listing stand out by being creative. Use a unique font or text color. If you can, add a short video to the job description. The video could talk about the positive aspects of the role along with some perks of the company.  It could also feature employee testimonials talking about why they love working for the company and where the company is headed in the future.

Focus on What Is Most Important

A job description should be short and simple. Do not drive away potential candidates by listing every single desirable qualification. The ideal candidate may not have every skill that on your list. Language that is exclusionary may cause the perfect candidate to not bother applying for the position. So, choose what skills are most important and list them in the job description. Stick to about five or six key qualifications. The same goes with job duties. Do not list every duty associated with the job. It does not provide insight into what tasks are the most important and can drive potential candidates away. Instead, choose five or six of the most important responsibilities for the position.

Do you need help writing job descriptions or identifying talent for hard to fill roles? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450!

5 Trends That Will Redefine Your Recruiting Strategy in the New Year

December 21st, 2016

Out with the old, in with the new—talent acquisition marketing strategy, that is.

2017 is promising to be a very busy year for recruiters, as the job market picks up and recently finalized trade agreements have the global economy in full swing. Despite the job-related optimism, many talent leaders are still struggling with a general lack of resources and an undefined employment brand strategy.

So what can you expect in hiring and recruiting strategy for 2017?

Talent is Key for C-Suite: When it comes to company success, recruiting leaders are key to their organization’s efforts. More than 83 percent of talent acquisition leaders hold talent as their number one resource, and 75 percent of recruiters say that their team is one of the top reasons for company growth and new success.

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Focus on Sales, Operations, and Engineering: A majority of recruiters expect to hire more employees in the coming year, and the bulk of that number will be in sales. To stay relevant, recruiters will need to find innovative ways to recruit talent pools in the sales, operations, and engineering industries.

Hiring Source Diversity: Recruiters often say that employee referrals are their biggest source of top quality hires. This makes sense, given that referred employees are quicker to hire, more committed to their jobs, and better performers over the long term. To keep the talent pools full, however, recruiters will still need to maintain their presence with staffing firms, on social networks, and marketing your employee and personal brand across all platforms.

Employer and Employee Branding: Not everyone has an unlimited recruiting budget—and when money is tight, the best course of action is often to spend conservatively. With more than 50 percent of recruiting budgets allocated to recruitment agencies and job boards and just 17 percent slated for technology, it seems recruiters may have some wiggle room when it comes to being a bit adventurous with the budget. Since investing in the employer branding strategy is at the top of 53 percent of recruiter’s wish lists, 2017 might be just the right time for a bit of non-traditional recruitment spending.

Automation and Data: Since hiring demands continue to grow while recruiters struggle with a limited budget and even fewer human resources, automated screening processes and data-driven hiring strategies seem to be the next logical step toward talent acquisition efficiency. Larger companies report that big data is their number one trend for the coming year, touting minimal human bias, higher screening accuracy, and efficient soft skill assessment as distinct advantages in the recruitment process.

Do you need help with your 2017 recruiting strategy? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450!

Why Retention is Crucial to Your Recruiting Strategy in 2017

December 14th, 2016

With a job market that’s on the upswing and employers looking to hire more workers in 2017, it seems recruiters have a busy year ahead. For at least the next few years, one of the most important elements in your talent acquisition and recruitment toolkit will be talent retention. The reason? Basic supply and demand.

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Starting in 2007, companies were forced to deal with the recession and the related fallout from a struggling economy. Employers had to make some tough decisions regarding eliminating employee benefits to cut costs—often cutting back on employees as well. The recession left employers holding all the cards while employees struggled with fewer perks, nonexistent benefits, and heavier workloads. With employees feeling privileged to simply have any job at all, the idea of employee retention as a recruiting strategy was not even on an employer’s radar.

As we approach 2017, the tides have shifted. To avoid a massive skills shortage, recruiters and employers alike have to start thinking of ways to keep top-notch employees in the positions they worked so hard to fill.

With increased demand for talent, companies have started revisiting their perks, compensation, and benefits offerings. Along with developing more attractive compensation plans, employers are shifting their focus toward talent retention in an effort to avoid suffering a skills and labor shortage in the foreseeable future.

A Renewed Focus on the Long Term

Along with an improving economy comes a new set of challenges for recruiters and employers. Companies that can’t hold on to their employees will suffer market-based shifts in the availability of top-quality talent every time the job market fluctuates—making consistency and productivity nearly impossible to attain.

To maintain growth in a thriving economy, companies should focus on the following hiring and talent elements:

Retention of Quality Candidates:The talent pipeline is a talent acquisition team’s greatest asset. From the moment a viable candidate visits a recruiter or signs on to a career page, maintaining that connection is vital to retention efforts.

Holding onto Key Employees: This should go without saying, as quality employees are the backbone of every organization.  A high volume of potential candidates simply can’t replace the tenure and experience of a seasoned employee. At the same time, high-potential leaders are the most sought after during times of high demand, and turnover in these situations is somewhat inevitable. This is an area where retention strategy can make a huge difference in whether you keep a valuable potential leader or are faced with starting over from scratch.

Retaining Lead Personnel: When an organization has trouble retaining its top personnel, company morale suffers and overall productivity takes a nosedive. An innovative retention strategy is essential for companies who want to avoid losing top leaders to the competition.

Do you need help attracting and retaining key talent? Give us a call at (877) 746-8450!

How to Make Your Business a Talent Magnet

September 21st, 2016

Every company, large and small is challenged when it comeVector business conceptual background in flat style. The hand of businessman holding magnet and attracts happy customers or clients of different age and race to the business.s to attracting, developing, and retaining the best talent. For decades now, “lean” has been the buzz word in manufacturing. The lean business model has spread across industries, including the recruitment of quality talent. Here are a few tips to help you attract and keep the best and brightest, while remaining efficient:

Attract

What if, instead of bearing the cost of recruitment, (fees, travel expenses, etc.) you could have all the top candidates be drawn to you like a magnet? Corporations such as Apple and Google have perfected the art of employer magnetism. But you don’t have to be a tech giant to create a similar attraction.

Businesses need to focus on creating a workplace environment in which people enjoy working, according to Roberta Matusun, author of Talent Magnetism: How to Build a Workplace That Attracts and Keeps the Best. She also points out that, apart from the product or service they offer to consumers, businesses should also brand themselves as an employer.

Create Purpose

A mid-sized California BioPharm company has been able to capture the element of purpose. They boast a job satisfaction rate of 77% of their 18,000 employees. Almost all of them (90%) stated that they feel as though they have a “high job meaning.” Purpose is especially important when you are targeting a younger workforce as Millennial generation; it is said, work for the purpose, not the pay.

How to Create Purpose

Graham Kenny, writing for the Harvard Business Review says purpose, is not a company’s values, mission or vision. Your purpose statement needs to say; “this is what we are doing for our customers.”  To craft an effective purpose statement, it is important to convey the impact your organization has on the lives of the people it serves. Success in this area will inspire your employees to become invested.

Engage, Motivate, Retain

Face it, at times it is simply hard to get out of bed in the morning. Imagine working in an environment where you wouldn’t be missed if you didn’t show up at all. It is imperative that the modern workplace is structured to make employees feel integral to the day-to-day operations. Doing so creates a culture of engagement and a feeling that the success of their organization is dependent on the full participation of each individual, no matter their position. When employees feel motivated, they become more engaged, and that translates directly into improved retention.

By creating a corporate culture in which employees enjoy working, feel they have a purpose, and understand how they connect to the overall “big picture,” you will not only attract the most desirable talent but most importantly, inspire them to stay.

How to Retain Millennials

July 30th, 2015

Everyone seems to be curious about Millennials.Millennial-Workforce They are, after all taking over the workforce – in the next ten years they will comprise 75% of the global workforce (The Deloitte Millennial Survey). So, employers should take time to get to know millennials and what makes them tick.

One thing we know is that millennials are job hoppers. According to a survey by Pinpoint Market Research, 39% of participants aged 20-29, have already held 4-7 full-time jobs and 83% plan to stay at a single job for just two years, unless promoted. What is it that makes millennials move around so much? What do millennials value? Let’s look a little further into what Pinpoint found in their millennial survey to figure out how to retain millennials.

  1. Offer work/life balance: this seems to be one of the most important things that millennials seek from an employer. 88%, aged 20-29, said they seek a consistent work/life balance and 57% said they will leave a job if they aren’t getting it.
  2. Create opportunities to work from home: part of a work/life balance is the flexibility to work at home. 72% choose companies with work-from-home options.
  3. Don’t assume money is everything: if your retention plan is to throw money on the table when an employee seems unhappy, think again. 47% choose fewer hours over more pay and 60% choose “love of job” over money earned. Perhaps you should look at your workload expectations instead.
  4. Ensure your company is stable: millennials seek employment at stable companies – 88% say company stability is a top priority when considering employers.
  5. Focus on learning opportunities and career development: millennials want to work for an employer that fosters learning and development AND pays for it. 81% want companies to invest in their professional development and 83% want a clear path to promotion and will leave if they don’t get it. Here’s a few more statistics that really emphasize this one:
    • 83% want tuition reimbursement for education sought while employed
    • 78% want learning opportunities in leadership
    • 73% want to attend conferences, networking events and seminars

Based on the findings in this survey, millennials care about work/life balance, flexibility and career development. What will you do to retain millennial workers?

Talent Acquisition – What’s in a Name?

July 11th, 2012

Guest blog spot by Lisa Van Ess, CBI Group team member

Those of us in the recruiting and HR business have used a lot of terminology over the years to describe what can simply be defined as an employee service. Clear communication (even to the point of corporate jargon interpretation), match-making, coaching, and advisory business are all components of this service. The newest descriptive term happens to be Talent Acquisition. Perhaps it is my years in financial services, but this one has the same ring to it as Human Capital.

Both terms seem to monetize people; which, while I have built and sustained a career in the solid belief that people are any organization’s greatest asset, looking at them as purely dollars and cents feels like they are just numbers. Companies, leaders, and recruiters don’t really get and keep talented people through acquisition (unless your organization merges with or takes over another firm), or the occasional bidding war for talent that may feel like a hostile takeover, especially when you lose this compensation-based battle.

Recruiting is really all about identifying, attracting, and retaining the talented individuals that fit the culture and values of your organization and who can take your team to the next level. A really simple process for this is:

  1. Know your client, company, or team’s business and culture; and know the job you are seeking to fill really, REALLY well.
  2. Identify and reach out to networks of talent whose experiences and values are a fit for open opportunities and genuinely tell your client’s or company’s story with detailed information about the job.
  3. Those who respond to your story will be potential ‘fits’ for your opportunities, follow-up and don’t let a talented person slip into that legendary recruiting/HR Black Hole!
  4. Thoroughly screen and get to know your candidates – A very wise recruiter once told me that there are only two questions you need answered in determining if a candidate is a fit for a job: “Can this person do the job? Will this person do the job?” I focus on the ‘Will’. Will they do it? Will they be happy doing it in the long run? Will the team/organization be happy with them? I have learned along the way that someone who ‘Almost Can’ but ‘Definitely Will’ can be taught the necessary skills while a ‘borderline willing person’ may never fit.
  5. Set clear expectations about the job, culture, company, career and compensation advancement – the good , bad, and the ugly. Let people be fully knowledgeable about signing up for something, eliminate surprises!
  6. As a leader, HR, or recruitment practitioner deliver on the expectations you set and invest in your newly acquired, talented employee! Lead, coach, tour-guide and mentor – acclimating to a new job is never easy. Remember why you selected this talented person and support them, you won’t be sorry.

So, whatever we call it next year, the constant practice of finding, attracting, relating as a human and collaborating honestly through the recruiting and on-boarding process, investing in and supporting people will always result in the building and retention of talented teams!

Who is responsible for your workforce strategy?

October 5th, 2011

I talk to many small business and Talent Acquisition leaders and have discovered an interesting trend emerging in terms of how firms use their contingent workforce. Many use a temporary workforce by accident or as a path of least resistance. I am reminded of an old Placers story from many years ago.
 
Our business provided temps of all levels and skills for an entire banking operation. The company was staging planned emergency preparedness drills and the leadership was discussing how to communicate the emergency plan with all their employees. When we suggested that all temps should know about emergency drills, the leader mentioned that it was probably overkill, after all how many contractors did they have in the building anyway? Well wasn’t the President surprised when they had 767?! This news did not diminish their use of temporary workers — it actually encouraged them to use more contractors. If this process was so effective and bug free that the President did not know about it, then why not leverage the use of a temporary workforce to get hiring done. Instead, the news prompted the question, who is responsible for this workforce strategy?
 
Today, with such uncertainty in the economy, doesn’t the rising temporary workforce prompt the same question? Who is responsible for the workforce strategy in your company? If it is not the President, then who is it? There is more visibility and transparency in the business world these days and we are never short of data and numbers to crunch. Gone are the days of the wild west where business does not know about purchased labor or temp usage. Businesses now survive by being flexible, by limiting the built-up, fixed costs in their company. With temp usage on the rise, it is critical to make sure someone is paying attention and managing this part of your business. So how can you apply some simple business principles?

    • Appoint someone on your organization chart to own your workforce strategy.
    • Develop a contingent workforce strategy: what percentage of your workforce should be contractual?
    • Take a look at your work peaks and valleys: how much risk is there in having your entire workforce be yours at the peak?
    • Talk to some staffing partners. Most partners today can be consultative and help you put together a strategy that fits your business needs.
    • Reporting. Do you have visibility into your spend? Into how your workforce is performing? Do you have retention information?

Being accountable is considered “in” today. Sometimes responsibility avoids us because no one has been assigned the job. Are you certain someone is responsible for your workforce strategy? Check your organizational chart please.
 

DelMarVa SHRM Presentation – March 16, 2010

March 17th, 2010

I was honored to be the speaker at last night’s DelMarVa SHRM event. View the presentation above or download using the link below.

“The Economic Tsunami: How Businesses Are Rethinking Recruitment & Retention.”
Delmarva SHRM – Economic Tsunami Presentation
 

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